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Montréal Transit Developments

aquateam

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The CDPQi will be mandated to study a REM/LRT extension instead of the previously announced Longueuil streetcar by the city of Longueuil.

It's bizarre that Quebec has delegated responsibility for transit planning to a pension fund instead of using the ARTM agency that they created for that express purpose. But at least they have been getting some results from it.
 

asher__jo

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It's bizarre that Quebec has delegated responsibility for transit planning to a pension fund instead of using the ARTM agency that they created for that express purpose. But at least they have been getting some results from it.
Agreed. There should've been an order to form a joint panel at the very least.
 

rbt

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Canada Line was cheaper than the Hurontario LRT per km including inflation, despite the fact that the former was like 50% underground, and the latter is at grade.
A tender from 2003 needs a fairly large construction inflation adjustment applied.
 
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drum118

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Canada Line was cheaper than the Hurontario LRT per km including inflation, despite the fact that the former was like 50% underground, and the latter is at grade.
You are comparing apples to oranges as there is more than inflation that needs to do a comparison right. Cost of various things have increased in cost higher than inflation and that includes the risk factor as well return on the dollar.
 

asher__jo

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You are comparing apples to oranges as there is more than inflation that needs to do a comparison right. Cost of various things have increased in cost higher than inflation and that includes the risk factor as well return on the dollar.
Agreed. There was also dozens of cost efficiencies (compromises) found with actual design of the line, construction methods and labour.
 

SFO-YYZ

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Taschereau has nowhere near enough density yet to demand a light metro service. Today it's still 70% parking lot.
Streetcars/LRT systems can have heated shelters.
Plenty of use cases where elevated metros through lower density areas can increase population and build density, especially around stations via TOD. Skytrain in Vancouver is a prime example how a frequent, well-run rapid transit (built at affordable cost) can generate higher density developments. The Langley extension of Skytrain which has just been approved is a great use case of this pattern (Langley BC is literally semi rural with ultra low density - they are trying use Skytrain to create TOD density in the next 10 years).

Also, making any local expansion/extension as part of the existing system decreases operating cost (uniform rollingstock and more efficient maintenance vs. need to upkeep multiple modes of rollingstock), as well as increasing simplicity for transit users (where REM could be all-in-one regional rapid rail system).
 
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sacred

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Plenty of use cases where elevated metros through lower density areas can increase population and build density, especially around stations via TOD. Skytrain in Vancouver is a prime example how a frequent, well-run rapid transit (built at affordable cost) can generate higher density developments. The Langley extension of Skytrain which has just been approved is a great use case of this pattern (Langley BC is literally semi rural with ultra low density - they are trying use Skytrain to create TOD density in the next 10 years).

Also, making any local expansion/extension as part of the existing system decreases operating cost (uniform rollingstock and more efficient maintenance vs. need to upkeep multiple modes of rollingstock), as well as increasing simplicity for transit users (where REM could be all-in-one regional rapid rail system).
I guess I live so close to Taschereau that I'm becoming a nimby. Haha
 

SFO-YYZ

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I guess I live so close to Taschereau that I'm becoming a nimby. Haha
As much as I appreciate a good old fashioned streetcar/tramway as the next man, from a service perspective something like the REM is most definitely an upgrade. It's faster, more reliable, and most likely faster/cheaper to build (with less potential opposition from auto-centric local populations). And I think it'll make the REM a true interurban rapid transit network similar to Skytrain. And somewhat comforting to know that it's CDPQi is taking this on, given that there is huge real estate potential / TOD along the line and I'm sure CDPQi will factor this into their decision.

Once again, kind of bogs my mind how this wasn't even considered by Metrolinx for the GTA (Hurontario, Finch, Crosstown, etc. etc.)
 

Coolstar

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As much as I appreciate a good old fashioned streetcar/tramway as the next man, from a service perspective something like the REM is most definitely an upgrade. It's faster, more reliable, and most likely faster/cheaper to build (with less potential opposition from auto-centric local populations). And I think it'll make the REM a true interurban rapid transit network similar to Skytrain. And somewhat comforting to know that it's CDPQi is taking this on, given that there is huge real estate potential / TOD along the line and I'm sure CDPQi will factor this into their decision.

Once again, kind of bogs my mind how this wasn't even considered by Metrolinx for the GTA (Hurontario, Finch, Crosstown, etc. etc.)
Oh, but it was. Back in the 80s.

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Coolstar

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Yes!!!

The REM is basically GO ALRT, for Montreal.

Somehow, 40 years later, GO ALRT lives....in the wrong Canadian city!!
Haha, that's right. Though technically GO-ALRT does live on in the form of GO RER in terms of electrification, rapid transit-like service, upgrading existing rail corridors. Only thing is that it's not fully automated, more of the GO corridor is electrified and there's no northern segment but that's technically covered by the Finch West LRT and Sheppard Subway once fully extended.
 
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robmausser

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Haha, that's right. Though technically GO-ALRT does live on in the form of GO RER in terms of electrification, rapid transit-like service, upgrading existing rail corridors. Only thing is that it's not fully automated, more of the GO corridor is electrified and there's no northern segment but that's technically covered by the Finch West LRT and Sheppard Subway once fully extended.
The REM is much closer to GO ALRT in methodology than GO RER. GO RER is just electrification of existing heavy rail lines with increased frequency and some form of PTC. Its an upgrade of existing systems.

REM/ALRT is using smaller, lightweight Light Rail Metro trains in dedicated and fully automated lines that both run along existing rail corridors (on their own tracks) but also on new lines that are underground and elevated more like a Metro system.

GO ALRT had a completely new northern segment that was not part of any existing rail network in Toronto.
 

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