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2022 election - who is running for mayor?

What I see in Gil's platform is that he is against the way Toronto tried to remove park encampents and he plans both to create more long term housing and to improve the shelter system within the first 100 days to get people out of the parks. Since we still have people living in tents in parks today after Tory's attempts to clear encampments I don't know why you think it would be worse under Peñalosa. I am encouraged by his addressing short and long term progress.

Creating long term housing and improving the shelter system will take a long time. I am pessimistic about Gil getting an adequate amount of funds from council to improve the situation to the degree that's needed. In the meantime, (the way I interpret the language) he won't remove any tents in parks.

Today, the parks I frequently visit downtown don't have any long term campers anymore. There are there one day and gone the next. It's a definite improvement from a park usability standpoint. But, as you mentioned from what I can tell others like at least Allan Gardens have plenty of tents.
 
I want a mayor that will push for enforcement of bylaws. Get these tents out of our parks, for, example. Either push for supportive and equitable housing solutions to care for our most vulnerable, or send in the boots. Either way, clear the parks, the status quo of two dozen squats in Allan Gardens is unacceptable. Who’s the best candidate to achieve this?

Climenhaga would count as semi-credible on the back of her '08 run, as well.

Sarah Climenhaga

Mayoral Candidate
Sarah Climenhaga is a community activist who previously ran in the 2018 municipal election, where she placed sixth with 4,765 votes. She also ran in the 2019 federal election as a Green Party candidate for the Toronto — St Paul’s riding, where she placed fourth with 6.8 percent of the vote. Climenhaga has worked for organizations like the World Wildlife Fund and Cycle Toronto in the past. In 2018, she cited safe streets as her biggest passion and said her decision to get involved in municipal politics was based in part in her advocacy work with groups like TTC riders and the St. Clair Right of Way Initiative for Public Transport. If elected, Climenhaga wants to implement a park ambassador program to address encampments, reconsider the city’s relationships with ride-sharing apps like Uber, and introduce participatory budgeting, which, according to The Local survey responses, she sees as a way to depolarize municipal politics and let residents to vote on city spending “rather than only getting to have their voice heard once every four years.” She has also expressed interest in ending vaccine mandates to “let individuals make decisions about individual health.”
 
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Hmmm yeah Gil's platform sounds more and more like empty talk the deeper you dig.

If he genuinely thinks he'll become dictator of Toronto after being elected and get to disband city council, then it might just be him being delusional.

But assuming he's been around the block it just seems like sophistry.
 
New Forum poll has Tory at 56% support, followed by Penalosa at 20%


Disappointing; but not a surprise.

Gil has been given very little media attention, and Tory very little criticism.

Gil really needed to declare earlier and have some type of TV campaign, even if only lasted two or three nights; his visibility is low outside activist circles.

****

Virtually impossible to overcome that gap, at this late date. The thought of 4 more years of lackluster, kick-the-can down the road, under performance does not please me.
 
If it's 56-and-20, that means way more for the sub-Penalosa candidates--a lot of whom seem to be pitching (however much in vain) for more "profile" than the recent-election fringe norm.

One unmentioned thing worth mentioning, though: from what I can tell, there isn't a far-right Faith Goldy figure hogging the oxygen. (Come to think of it, the overall mayoral electoral silence of the "freedom" bunch is deafening--though there are a few New Blue nutters trying their luck for Council.)
 
This election is a status quo. Much like 2021 federal and 2022 provincial. I predict ultra low turn out. I hope we hit a low bar so that it creates a wake up call. People just don’t care about politics right now because the game is rigged and no matter who you vote for or how it won’t change anything. There is no one hot issue to drive voters to change government. This is not a change election. The people that vote will vote for status quo. We will have sub 30% voter turnout out is my prediction.
 
The Star features a column summing up the debate:


Not behind the paywall at time of posting.

The gist is thus; Tory consistently on the defensive; Penalosa did ok; solid points, but seemed a bit flat to the reviewing columnist who was sufficiently taken by the fire of Chloe Brown to describe her as the clear winner.

This was the exchange that Keenan found worthy of note:

1665740299578.png


From Gil, he offered this line:

1665740359990.png


Finally, he closed by offering his own (Keenan's) thoughts: "But Tory’s been mayor eight years. How much progress is enough? And how long are we prepared to wait for more?"
 
If it's 56-and-20, that means way more for the sub-Penalosa candidates--a lot of whom seem to be pitching (however much in vain) for more "profile" than the recent-election fringe norm.

One unmentioned thing worth mentioning, though: from what I can tell, there isn't a far-right Faith Goldy figure hogging the oxygen. (Come to think of it, the overall mayoral electoral silence of the "freedom" bunch is deafening--though there are a few New Blue nutters trying their luck for Council.)
Sarah Climenhaga fills that void.
 

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