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2022 election - who is running for mayor?

I’m pretty pro-housing, but I’m fairly in favor of use-it or lose-it with somewhat generous timelines. By submitting plans and having the city go through the effort of approving them, you’ve cost the citizens a lot of money. That approval should not be seen as a perpetual right to develop the land. I don’t see the strong argument for a perpetual right beyond “this is what’s been done”.
 
Here's an idea for Tory:

How about you properly fund the Planning Department (among others) so there will be less of a backlog of projects sitting in the pipeline under appeals to LPAT. That would also be a good simple start that could help with some things.

For a city that's experiencing such tremendous growth, it's pathetic what we're seeing take place in that department.
 
After eight years of Tory I'm just sick of the neglect and abandonment of our public places. Why haven't we enforced bylaws against construction noise, camping in parks and ravines, against public obstruction, litter, dumping and graffiti? I don't think I have seen a bylaw officer walk through Allan Gardens park, for example, since before 2020, no matter the place is covered in tents, litter, etc.

Fouling and obstruction (743-9)
Camping in parks (608-13)
Littering (548-2)
Failure to remove graffiti (485-7)
Leashing and walking dogs (349-12)
Construction noise (bylaw 591-2)

Never once can I recall Tory demanding that TPS enforce the Safe Streets Act. I know, it's provincial and TPS don't take orders from the mayor, but they'd both still listen and consider Tory's request. Here's Tory in 2003:


"The biggest problem is not the lack of a law to scoop these people up off the street, it is the lack of effective action and especially the lack of appropriate facilities to help the homeless break the cycle they are in," he said. As mayor, Mr. Tory promised to get tough on panhandling, urging heavy fines to combat a problem he says has "gotten out of hand." He proposes to ban panhandling in the tourist-oriented downtown area bounded by Bloor-Davenport, Parliament, Bathurst and Lake Ontario.

Okay, Tory, that was eleven years ago. What have you done to deal with these issues?

If you're a conservative mayor, you're supposed to be tough on bylaw and law enforcement. If you're a progressive mayor, you're supposed to be a champion of social housing. But Tory is neither, but some sort of wishy middle mayor that defends and believes in nothing.
 
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Gil Penalosa is out with a campaign promise to pass a SanFrancisco style limitation on formula or chain retail.

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I'm not clear if the City of Toronto has this power under the City of Toronto Act; but I'm broadly in support of the idea.
 
Has there been studies of how effective such policies are? Seems like there would be ways of escaping or gaming such rules.
 
Has there been studies of how effective such policies are? Seems like there would be ways of escaping or gaming such rules.

This is a plaintive piece against such restrictions; pov aside, its fairly informative:

 
Would it contribute to food deserts by banning chain grocery stores, or are they exempt as well? The perverse incentive structure might lead to more uber delivery from dark kitchens if storefronts are banned.
 
Would it contribute to food deserts by banning chain grocery stores, or are they exempt as well? The perverse incentive structure might lead to more uber delivery from dark kitchens if storefronts are banned.

SF policy specifically allows a neighbourhood to wave the rule for stores they want in their community, with examples given of grocery and hardware stores. How, precisely that waver is achieved I'm not clear.
 
I found this interesting. " over 90% of Torontonians prefer independent businesses for specialty food, personal services, restaurants, and bars." I think it's a popular sentiment to want to be someone who prefers small businesses (or present oneself as someone who does in a survey), but people like their points, low prices (inflation anyone??), and convenience. Not sure I'm a fan of this, San Fran is a city for the top 1%. Toronto isn't fully that way (yet), although it is getting there. I think this kind of idea puts our city on that path to becoming even more just a city for the ultra rich. I think Gil is out of touch on this one, appealing to the rich.
 
I found this interesting. " over 90% of Torontonians prefer independent businesses for specialty food, personal services, restaurants, and bars." I think it's a popular sentiment to want to be someone who prefers small businesses (or present oneself as someone who does in a survey), but people like their points, low prices (inflation anyone??), and convenience. Not sure I'm a fan of this, San Fran is a city for the top 1%. Toronto isn't fully that way (yet), although it is getting there. I think this kind of idea puts our city on that path to becoming even more just a city for the ultra rich. I think Gil is out of touch on this one, appealing to the rich.

Disagree.

Chains monopolize when they get past a certain size, and in so doing they reduce competition and increase prices.

We have 2 grocers than control almost 1/2 the market in Toronto, and 4 that control more than 80%.

Starbucks dominates the upmarket coffee space.

I don't think restricting Starbucks from opening another store drives up the cost of coffee,. nor for that matter does restricting another Tim's from opening (assuming you agree what either of these sells should be passed off as coffee).

We can fairly discuss what any limits should be and again the importance of waivers if, for instance a grocery chain is willing to open in a food desert. But I think this is an entirely reasonable idea.
 
I found this interesting. " over 90% of Torontonians prefer independent businesses for specialty food, personal services, restaurants, and bars." I think it's a popular sentiment to want to be someone who prefers small businesses (or present oneself as someone who does in a survey), but people like their points, low prices (inflation anyone??), and convenience. Not sure I'm a fan of this, San Fran is a city for the top 1%. Toronto isn't fully that way (yet), although it is getting there. I think this kind of idea puts our city on that path to becoming even more just a city for the ultra rich. I think Gil is out of touch on this one, appealing to the rich.
Usually much better to measure behaviour and revealed preferences than to ask people their opinion. Some independent retailers are great. Many are not.
 

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