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TTC: Other Items (catch all)

Very location specific. It happened after a collision on Allen Road.
If you create a heatmap of every 'very specific' collision, you'd probably cover every inch of arterial/main street in the city, depending on how many years back you go. Calling crashes 'specific' is not the defense you think it is.
 
If you create a heatmap of every 'very specific' collision, you'd probably cover every inch of arterial/main street in the city, depending on how many years back you go. Calling crashes 'specific' is not the defense you think it is.
I don't think you've understood what was being said, debris from a collision ending up on the subway is not at all a frequent occurrence but some places can be more likely to have this happen than others. After all, a car hood is unlikely to block the subway tracks at the Finch station crossover.

The section of the Allen between Yorkdale is more vulnerable than the rest of the system given the fact that while separated, the protection afforded to the subway line is a guard rail and a chainlink fence, no protection from airborne objects. It's also not elevated from the adjacent roadway and vehicles there travel with enough speed that collisions are going to provide debris with plenty of kinetic energy.
 
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If you create a heatmap of every 'very specific' collision, you'd probably cover every inch of arterial/main street in the city, depending on how many years back you go. Calling crashes 'specific' is not the defense you think it is.
I wasn't aware I needed a "defense".
What have I been accused of now? I can add it to being a Philistine.

The subway system is vast. Not everyone will immediately remember there are stretches like Allen Road where it's right there beside active traffic lanes. That was all I was saying in response to the question about how it could even be possible.
 
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The new 114 bus route along Queen's Quay east as far as Logan/Carlaw started a few weeks ago, amazingly the TTC seem to have changed the bus stop signage already. Can those silos be talking??
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That's a pretty stiff curb........something like 8 inches? (its well over double, if not triple most sidewalk curbs). Most cars will not take well to attempting to mount that.

I don't think it would be worthwhile to mount industrial grade guard rails or jersey barriers all along the route, a side to side climb by accident isn't quite impossible but beyond unlikely.

That said, where, as in this case, an intersection faces the ROW, I think there's a case to be made for a 15M stretch of guard rail. {there shouldn't be, but the evidence is what it is)

Yipes. That truck landed in the tracks in a location where the entire right of way is raised above street level. Assuming the driver came around the bend off South Kingsway, they should have stopped at the stop sign. To drive over that level of raised curb (the right of way itself is raised, the curb isn't that much higher than the trackbed itself) took a lot of acceleration from the stop sign - or a lot of absence of braking if the stop sign was missed.

I can't see barriers being much of a solution to that kind of thing. The truck would possibly have overrun the barrier, enough to stop streetcar service while the affair was sorted out.

- Paul

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Interesting:

A converted LRV is operating on the line, but not in passenger service. A driver is still present at the controls during this initial phase of the project, but the LRV operates completely autonomously in the depot.
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Moscow Metro says that the software for driverless operation has been developed by its own staff without external assistance. “This unmanned technology is a unique European development owned by the Moscow city government,” it says.
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“In the next phase, by the end of 2024, the LRV will begin fully controlling the driving process in test mode, with the driver serving as a backup,” says Mr Maksim Liksutov, Moscow’s deputy mayor for transport.
 
Interesting:


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By 2050, drivers will be a thing from the past for LRV and buses along with subways. This has been in the works fo the last 20years.

This will get rid of the Sunday drivers and and the lead foot one where schedules become a mesh mash because of them to having a more reliable one than today. This will happen as long as fool car drivers don't mess things up as well fires.
 
Let's hope this won't be the case.

It certainly won't happen in every city, at any rate. I can't imagine New York will ever eliminate drivers fully, and thank God for that.
It coming regardless those who oppose it with timetable being different for most places. This will happen to automobile before 2100 as well.
 
I must have missed the part where the test in Moscow was declared a success. They're only starting to test it now, we don't even know if it will work properly. We've been hearing from the auto bros that driverless cars are around the corner for the last 20 years, too, and so far they are only a fringe technology with zero indication there will be widespread adoption of it any time soon.

There is no chance that "by 2050, drivers will be a thing from the past for LRV and buses"... that's in 26 years! You don't go from one city testing a brand new technology to full global elimination in a timeframe like that. Especially not when the tech is proprietary and developed by a country much of the west is in a proxy war with. It's not happening. Not even every metro system in the world will be. 2100, maybe, provided that the unions don't block it (which could only be a good thing).
 

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