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TTC CLRV Streetcars: Where will they go once they are retired?

thettctransitfanatic

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^Geez, we aren’t committing a social faux-pas here. the word was invented by people specifically to describe a difference that is observable and communicates useful (if cautionary) information.
It was not rooted in racism, anti-disabilityism, or any other less honorable vestige of some historical social inequity.
There may be some stigma to the term, at least to the degree that some element of the hobby is found to be less credible as advocates, and/or behaves in ways that are annoying to others. Which I believe was the point being made about enthusiasts taking up more than their share of the bandwidth which the TTC was offering the public by running PCC’s on weekends.
I don’t find the term any more objectionable than say ‘conspiracy theorist’, although I might well use the term dismissively to reject their argument on its face. But then, I admit to being both things ;-)

- Paul
And, that's what I was saying. The PCC event, was interesting. Foamer isn't a word meant to bully or make fun of people, simply all the word is describing people who are "a little over the top or have an excessive" interest here in the transit community. Keep this in mind!
 

smallspy

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^Easy, folks. The term has long been used to describe obsessive rail enthusiasts, and was possibly invented by railway employees who were sick of same. While it was originally intended to be derogatory, the hobby has come to embrace the term and many rail buffs use it proudly to describe themselves. It has become self-deprecating rather than derogatory..... at least in the context of rail/trainsit enthusiasts.

The term definitely implies thinking from an enthusiast's mind set, rather than using good professional judgement based on understanding urban planning, transit engineering and operation, business management, etc. Transit enthusiasts want public transit that is efficient, popular, well run, well used, economical, contributes to our society. The foamer just wants a particular brand of bus on a particular route because they look cool, and it's the route to their high school.

Many transit and railway workers are closet or open enthusiasts. If they behave like foamers (as opposed to professionals) at work, they tend to get fired. So the term is not always meant kindly, but that doesn't imply disability or some social stigma that deserves rebuke.

- Paul
Actually, the term originated in England, and there still has a very negative connotation when being used to describe someone. If you wish to refer to someone without malice, you refer to them there as a trainspotter.

But here in North America, it most certainly has become a sort of self-depreciating term and even a badge of inclusion.

Heck the N-word was acceptable in children's literature and TV programs when and where I was a kid. Times change.
And in a lot of communities, the term has been re-appropriated to also become a term of endearment between friends. That doesn't eliminate the negative connotations behind it, but it it does mean that in the right context it can and is used in a totally different light than its original usage.

Not only do times change, but so does the language. Isn't it ironic?

Dan
 

Johnny Au

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Ah no my friends, I wasn't bullying people with disabilities, I have one myself, but, it's kind of like the one about autism ( which I have ), where people who portray like a level of enthusiasm beyond the normal level would be regarded as such through memes and whatever. It's sad, but you can't control people.
I too have autism.

Yes, language changes over time.

Railfan is another socially accepted term for someone who is enthusiastic about rail infrastructure and vehicles that run on rails. Many of us here in UT are railfans.
 

thettctransitfanatic

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I too have autism.

Yes, language changes over time.

Railfan is another socially accepted term for someone who is enthusiastic about rail infrastructure and vehicles that run on rails. Many of us here in UT are railfans.
See your point. I do use railfan, and describe myself as such. Back on topic, The CLRVs will not be getting VISION at all, but the communication to transit control will be via a walkie talkie instead come April.
 
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robmausser

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Today I rode 4001 and last week rode 4002, man what nice vehicles for 40 years old!
Some got refurbished. But yes, still they did a great job of servicing our city for 4 decades.

The only gripes about them are the trolly poles (not their fault) and compressed air for doors etc, which fails in cold weather.

Otherwise they are great.

My main gripe about the new streetcars are how narrow they are between the wheels, and how slow the doors open and close. Nothing worse than waiting at a green light, have the doors close, then a person run up and click the door button to get on, and watch the pedestrian counter go down while a single door takes 20 seconds to open and close. Red light, wait another turn.
 

thettctransitfanatic

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Some got refurbished. But yes, still they did a great job of servicing our city for 4 decades.

The only gripes about them are the trolly poles (not their fault) and compressed air for doors etc, which fails in cold weather.

Otherwise they are great.

My main gripe about the new streetcars are how narrow they are between the wheels, and how slow the doors open and close. Nothing worse than waiting at a green light, have the doors close, then a person run up and click the door button to get on, and watch the pedestrian counter go down while a single door takes 20 seconds to open and close. Red light, wait another turn.
Yep, the Flexity door button just encourages last minute runners I find. Even I have done it.
 

nfitz

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Yep, the Flexity door button just encourages last minute runners I find. Even I have done it.
The door only opens if the driver has let it be opened. I've pressed the button before, and it's not opened, and driven away. Which is fair enough if it's already cycled once, but rather annoying if one chose to press the button while it was closing rather than stick your leg in the door to block the censor ... lesson learned!
 
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thettctransitfanatic

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The door only opens if the driver has let it be opened. I've pressed the button before, and it's not opened, and driven away. Which is fair enough if it's already cycled once, but rather annoying if one chose to press the button while it was closing rather than stick your leg in the door to block the censor ... lesson learned!
Yep, today after getting off of 4108 I crossed Queen and Roncy, and 4516 had pulled away from the stop already. But the driver had allowed me to press the button to opened the door, and saved me from having to wait another 10-15 mins!
 

nfitz

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Yep, today after getting off of 4108 I crossed Queen and Roncy, and 4516 had pulled away from the stop already. But the driver had allowed me to press the button to opened the door, and saved me from having to wait another 10-15 mins!
I had an odd one today, where I wasn't going to bother pressing the button, as I could see another 504 very close behind, but someone else walked to the front door and pressed it and it opened, and about 4 more people started walking to that door. So I walked and touched the button on the second door ... which didn't open. But the first door was still open with people boarding. And the light turned green ... and the door was still open ... and I waited ... and then walked (not ran) to the first door and went in.

All very odd ...
 

robmausser

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Yep, today after getting off of 4108 I crossed Queen and Roncy, and 4516 had pulled away from the stop already. But the driver had allowed me to press the button to opened the door, and saved me from having to wait another 10-15 mins!
I think the buttons should be disabled at rush hour time tbh. Its nice at late night when the next streetcar might be 20 minutes away, but at rushour they are often every 4 minutes or less, and the button can slow down the system at a time when it needs every second to be saved as possible.
 

ShonTron

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One thing I don't like about the new streetcars is just how loud they are - at every stop, the loud announcement to look right and watch for passing vehicles, the loud, high-pitched beeps when the doors close. The CLRVs still in service are just so much quieter, and smoother-riding. The new vehicles are fully accessible, which is very important, but I wish the noises were a little softer.
 

thettctransitfanatic

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I think the buttons should be disabled at rush hour time tbh. Its nice at late night when the next streetcar might be 20 minutes away, but at rushour they are often every 4 minutes or less, and the button can slow down the system at a time when it needs every second to be saved as possible.
Well, was during the.midday period. Service on Roncy isn't as good midday

One thing I don't like about the new streetcars is just how loud they are - at every stop, the loud announcement to look right and watch for passing vehicles, the loud, high-pitched beeps when the doors close. The CLRVs still in service are just so much quieter, and smoother-riding. The new vehicles are fully accessible, which is very important, but I wish the noises were a little softer.
Yep. They make quite a but of noise, even late at night. The CLRVs are for sure, the 100 left, are all very smooth, although the CLRVs have had their shares of problems over the years
 

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