News   Sep 18, 2020
 1K     1 
News   Sep 18, 2020
 738     0 
News   Sep 18, 2020
 9.4K     4 

2019 Canadian Federal Election

Rufus8

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 7, 2013
Messages
206
Reaction score
75
Imagine if Trudeau would've denied citizenship to someone based on their cultural dress.

Imagine if Trudeau would've created a barbaric cultural practices hotline to target immigrant communities.

Just imagine....

Let's remind ourselves Harper was in power for nearly a decade, there is a completely different view of a long term government than a short term one. I still think Harper lost because people just wanted a change. It is ironic that Scheer whines about the spending of this Liberal government when the point of being in power is controlling the purse strings. Spending money is what governments do. Scheer still looks like he doesn't know where babies come from, how did he get elected leader?
 

Jasmine18

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
1,641
Reaction score
490
The majority of Canadians support a woman's right to chose. They would rightly be incensed.
The majority of Canadians also support that people can have their own private beliefs as well due to their faith.

I would say Trudeau's stance on the summer jobs program was not very popular with Canadians based on the backlash and they dropped it...

It was an example of virtue signalling far left-wing identity politics that a lot of people dont like from Trudeau.

Abortion is legal in this country and no government that will get elected will restrict it or they would face political suicide. People can sense Trudeau keeps making abortion an issue to frankly divide Canadians and export American issues for his electoral benefit.


This policy was the Harper equivalent of the barbaric cultural practice headline (well not that extreme but similar)


 
Last edited:

tiffer24

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
2,318
Reaction score
896
Location
Toronto
Latest @niknanos + Globe + CTV party tracking poll: LIB 32.6%, CON 30.3%, NDP 18.4%, GRN 9.3%, BQ 7.1%, PPC 1.9%.

Latest @niknanos + Globe + CTV tracking poll for preferred PM: @JustinTrudeau 32.5%, @AndrewScheer 24.8%, @theJagmeetSingh 18.8%, @ElizabethMay 7%, @yfblanchet 3%, @MaximeBernier 1.6%.
 

Jasmine18

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
1,641
Reaction score
490
Be honest turnout is what will decide things...

If liberals come out and vote or stay home or if the people who support NDP and bloc vote or vote liberal.

Like I dont really see the Tories dropping below 30% either...

Like i am quite confident it wont be a majority govt as the liberals would need to win 100 seats in ontario then.
 
Last edited:

jje1000

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 19, 2007
Messages
4,822
Reaction score
2,251
Interesting take on a possible post-election transitions:

Currently, the press is spending much time and effort attempting to normalize the idea that Justin Trudeau could remain prime minister of Canada even if the Conservative Party wins the most seats in the House of Commons in the October 21 general election, and the Liberals drop to second place.

This, we are told, would be perfectly defensible, since supposedly an incumbent prime minister “gets the first chance to test the confidence of the House of Commons,” or, in other words, gets to remain in office for some unspecified amount of time between the election and the first sitting of parliament (the scheduling of which he controls).
Canada is alone among major western democracies in not having any laws that clearly outline basic facts of our political system, including the mechanics of how, exactly, someone becomes prime minister. As a result, convention and tradition have always played an enormous role in determining what is right and wrong, normal and abnormal. Traditions evolve over time, and with them, new standards of what sort of behavior is proper and ethical.
 

Jasmine18

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
1,641
Reaction score
490
Decided going to vote NDP, hoping for a small liberal minority so Trudeau is severely weakened.

My prediction:
Libs 130
Tories 125
Bloc 40
NDP 40
Green 2
PPP 1
JWR 1
 

Bayer

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Mar 14, 2008
Messages
1,170
Reaction score
665
A Liberal-NDP coalition would be vastly more representative of Canadians than a Conservative minority government. And frankly, anyone who would favour proportional representation understands that political parties would have to learn to cooperate, and dump the mindless opposition for the sake of it that characterizes our current political system.

Of course, the other solution would have been for Trudeau to implement preferential voting, which was his initial goal before he became PM.
 

Jasmine18

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
1,641
Reaction score
490
A Liberal-NDP coalition would be vastly more representative of Canadians than a Conservative minority government. And frankly, anyone who would favour proportional representation understands that political parties would have to learn to cooperate, and dump the mindless opposition for the sake of it that characterizes our current political system.

Of course, the other solution would have been for Trudeau to implement preferential voting, which was his initial goal before he became PM.

To be honest the NDP should pretty much put their foot down and say "do electoral reform or try to govern with the Bloc instead... "

Because the issue is a lot of liberals dont think electoral reform is a big issue because '"we are the good guys" but this election has proven that the Trudeau brand has fallen a lot and that if the current FPTP is not changed, the question is not if but when the Conservatives will come back and get a majority government with 35-40% of the vote.
 

WislaHD

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 21, 2013
Messages
8,792
Reaction score
6,565
Location
Midtown Toronto
Of course, the other solution would have been for Trudeau to implement preferential voting, which was his initial goal before he became PM.
Not to rehash discussions of years past, but honestly I am glad that Trudeau walked away from electoral reform.

The Liberals were pushing for ranked ballot system, which would have heavily favoured the Liberals, to the point where they could receive super-majority governments in most elections. They quashed talk of any other voting system being considered and specifically silenced and sidelined Stephane Dion (an expert on electoral reform) on the issue, meanwhile, the Conservatives were pushing for referendum which never turns out well for electoral reformists (with the exception of in New Zealand), and if failed could have ended the discussion of reform for an entire generation.

Dropping the electoral reform promise was actually a good decision from Trudeau and the Liberals. Sure, they bungled the portfolio big time (especially Monsef, who should be nowhere near control of a ministry), but it takes strength to know when to walk away from a large part of your platform even while knowing the backlash you will receive.

Next time there is energy to talk electoral reform, maybe we will get it right and adopt Mixed-Member Proportional (MMP) or Single-Transferable Vote (STV) systems rather than Ranked Ballots.
 

Jasmine18

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
1,641
Reaction score
490
Not to rehash discussions of years past, but honestly I am glad that Trudeau walked away from electoral reform.

The Liberals were pushing for ranked ballot system, which would have heavily favoured the Liberals, to the point where they could receive super-majority governments in most elections. They quashed talk of any other voting system being considered and specifically silenced and sidelined Stephane Dion (an expert on electoral reform) on the issue, meanwhile, the Conservatives were pushing for referendum which never turns out well for electoral reformists (with the exception of in New Zealand), and if failed could have ended the discussion of reform for an entire generation.

Dropping the electoral reform promise was actually a good decision from Trudeau and the Liberals. Sure, they bungled the portfolio big time (especially Monsef, who should be nowhere near control of a ministry), but it takes strength to know when to walk away from a large part of your platform even while knowing the backlash you will receive.

Next time there is energy to talk electoral reform, maybe we will get it right and adopt Mixed-Member Proportional (MMP) or Single-Transferable Vote (STV) systems rather than Ranked Ballots.
I think you assume the Prime Minister had good intentions on electoral reform when I think he simply advocated it to get progressive voters in 2015.. I have serious doubts he was ever serious about it...

Trudeau never had any intention for electoral reform for the benefit of the country... it was to change the system to something that is even better for liberals or keeps the status quo which helps them as well.

If the PM really wanted electoral reform he could have explored all options but he did not and when he did not get his way, he dropped it.

It was a 100% political choice not something for 'the greater good'.
 

Jasmine18

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
1,641
Reaction score
490
So long as their faith stays out of government, yes. The only backlash was from conservatives troglodytes, and being loud doesn't mean being right.

I think you are simplifying the issue as a deeper look goes against your narrative.

Yes, there were a lot of social conservatives really upset about it ...

However, there were many in the mainstream media who are not conservative and even some liberals and NDP MPs were not comfortable with the 'bigger picture issue'...


That passing a values test to get government funds was a slippery slope.

It was a failed policy by Trudeau and i think objectively it's good they backtracked on it.
 

WislaHD

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 21, 2013
Messages
8,792
Reaction score
6,565
Location
Midtown Toronto
I think you assume the Prime Minister had good intentions on electoral reform when I think he simply advocated it to get progressive voters in 2015.. I have serious doubts he was ever serious about it...

Trudeau never had any intention for electoral reform for the benefit of the country... it was to change the system to something that is even better for liberals or keeps the status quo which helps them as well.

If the PM really wanted electoral reform he could have explored all options but he did not and when he did not get his way, he dropped it.

It was a 100% political choice not something for 'the greater good'.
Sure. That is a cynical interpretation of events, but not at all unjustified.
 

tiffer24

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
2,318
Reaction score
896
Location
Toronto
Last edited:

Top