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TTC: Streetcar Network

tmlittle

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One could also use longer streetcars or chain the streetcars into LRT type trains -- this has happened to some former streetcar routes elsewhere in the world.

You could hold off double-ended operation except for longer trains. Kind TTC would be a candidate for eventual complete LRT conversion since it will intersect with 8 subway stations (once all new stations are built, Ontario Line, Liberty GO, etc).

What are your thoughts on local frequent-stop services if high-ridership streetcar routes were to LRTify? In an ideal world, I feel like there would be "local" and "express" streetcars along routes like King rather than just eliminating half the stops and forcing people to walk, or ride a bus along a route that realistically shouldn't have cars anyway, but good luck finding political will for an initiative like that (converting an arterial to streetcar-only).
 

Jonny5

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What are your thoughts on local frequent-stop services if high-ridership streetcar routes were to LRTify? In an ideal world, I feel like there would be "local" and "express" streetcars along routes like King rather than just eliminating half the stops and forcing people to walk, or ride a bus along a route that realistically shouldn't have cars anyway, but good luck finding political will for an initiative like that (converting an arterial to streetcar-only).

Using King from Parliament to Dufferin as an example; it's not actually that far or that long of a ride. If you are removing stops or making "express" streetcars for this area you would likely remove under five stops--maybe even only three--from the current route which will save only a few minutes for the small number who travel through the whole thing. If you really want to speed things up for riders from the current implementation the change is to allow more than one streetcar to load and unload at the very busy stops (Yonge and University); then to force red traffic lights out of the equation with location tracking; then to move fare the payments (presto) away from the doors to stop imbeciles from slowing everything down by standing in everyones way.
 
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tmlittle

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Using King from Parliament to Dufferin as an example; it's not actually that far or that long of a ride. If you are removing stops or making "express" streetcars for this area you would likely remove under five stops--maybe even only three--from the current route which will save only a few minutes for the small number who travel through the whole thing. If you really want to speed things up for riders from the current implementation the change is to allow more than one streetcar to load and unload at the very busy stops (Yonge and University); then to force red traffic lights out of the equation with location tracking; then to move fare the payments (presto) away from the doors to stop imbeciles from slowing everything down by standing in everyones way.

All of that sounds more reasonable to me than removing stops, which is something I see argued for a lot by people who think they're pursuing LRTification.
 

W. K. Lis

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So true. From link.

 

W. K. Lis

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Did you know that the reason for the Dundas Exhibition (later 193 Exhibition Rocket) streetcar to the Dufferin Gates, was because there was no Dufferin bus south of Bloor Street West before 1961.(See link.)

The 29 Dufferin bus only came into existence after July 1, 1954, and only between Wilson Avenue and Eglinton Avenue West (see link).

The 73 Dufferin South existed between 1961 and 1962, and only between St.. Clair Avenue West and Queen Street West. It would merge with the 29 Dufferin bus in 1962, and extended to the Dufferin loop. (See link.)
 

blu_in_green

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I've been finding the Dundas West streetcar loop behind the station to be deafening lately. Is there any way to submit a complaint or encourage more regular greasing? Any way to garner support for a sound barrier?
 

W. K. Lis

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I've been finding the Dundas West streetcar loop behind the station to be deafening lately. Is there any way to submit a complaint or encourage more regular greasing? Any way to garner support for a sound barrier?

Winter. Can't use water.

The lubricate on the curves needs adjustment or repairs. When it rains or snows, the wheel squeal is reduced.

The subway curves into and out of Union Station and between Museum and St. George used to be deadening as well. Then they put water on the tracks and the noise got reduced. They use other lubricates these days. If they maintain it properly.
 

DSC

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I've been finding the Dundas West streetcar loop behind the station to be deafening lately. Is there any way to submit a complaint or encourage more regular greasing? Any way to garner support for a sound barrier?
There is a complaint form on TTC website (link at bottom right corner of main screen - whether complaining will be of any use is another matter!
 

Jonny5

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I've been finding the Dundas West streetcar loop behind the station to be deafening lately. Is there any way to submit a complaint or encourage more regular greasing? Any way to garner support for a sound barrier?

Complaining to the TTC will probably get you nowhere. Your councilor might get better results.
 

DSC

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Complaining to the TTC will probably get you nowhere. Your councilor might get better results.
That may well be true but from my experience you MAY get more attention from a councillor if you have tried the 'normal routes" first and can say "The TTC never replied/did nothing/???"
 

micheal_can

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Winter. Can't use water.

The lubricate on the curves needs adjustment or repairs. When it rains or snows, the wheel squeal is reduced.

The subway curves into and out of Union Station and between Museum and St. George used to be deadening as well. Then they put water on the tracks and the noise got reduced. They use other lubricates these days. If they maintain it properly.

What happens when ice meats hot steel wheels with friction?
 

W. K. Lis

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From link.

Wheel squeal

Wheel squeal from rail transit operations is a common occurrence on rail lines around the world. TTC subway operations also produce wheel squeal. The frequency of this squeal noise can be a source of annoyance to our customers and to residents who live adjacent to our rail operations. The sensation of a frequency is commonly referred to as the pitch of a sound. People generally refer to the “high pitch” of the squeal.

Wheel squeal is caused by the steel wheel interacting with the top of steel rail and also by the interaction of the wheel’s flange with the side of the running and restraining rails. Most commonly, this squeal/screech occurs on curved sections of subway track. On some portions of the subway system, such as the curved tracks approaching Union Station, automatic wayside lubricators are used, and a specially formulated lubricant is applied to the side of the rails. The lubricators help to reduce noise levels but do not entirely eliminate the squealing sound. The lubricators are inspected regularly by track maintenance staff to ensure they are operating properly. However, from time to time, humidity levels and sudden temperature changes can reduce the effectiveness of the wayside lubricators.

Used on streetcar curves and, coming soon, to a light rail line curve near you.
 

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