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Roads: Six Points Interchange Reconfiguration (City of Toronto, UC)

AlvinofDiaspar

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Look, all I'm saying is that 99% of the population don't know what these 2 names mean. A lot more know who Jerry Howarth is, you can't argue that.
We shouldn't be forcing aboriginal names just because they're aboriginal.
I am glad someone asked what Toronto stood for instead of York way back then. Or Canada, for that matter. No one is suggesting we need to banish non aboriginal names - but in this case Adobigok sounds like a suitable homage for the history of the area. And how would you learn if you didn’t encounter this name?

AoD
 
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raptor

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I am glad someone asked what Toronto stood for instead of York way back then. Or Canada, for that matter. No one is suggesting we need to banish non aboriginal names - but in this case Adobigok sounds like a suitable homage for the history of the area.

AoD
TORONTO is not one of the street names chosen. Seriously, the issue at hand is the chosen names, don't change the subject.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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TORONTO is not one of the street names chosen. Seriously, the issue at hand is the chosen names, don't change the subject.
The issue at hand isn‘t “I am sick of multiculturalism“ either, didn’t stop you from ranting about it. Pronoucability and confusion is a red herring in a city that has multiple king and queen and church streets for the longest time.

AoD
 

salsa

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Look, all I'm saying is that 99% of the population don't know what these 2 names mean. A lot more know who Jerry Howarth is, you can't argue that.
Meanwhile you still didn't answer this:
Can you tell me what Yonge street or Bloor Street or Strachan Avenue or or Bathurst Street or one of a trillion other english street names mean without googling it?
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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Don't twist my words please. Let's agree to disagree on the topic at hand.
Your words:

Had no clue what Adobigok meant until I googled it. I guess that makes me an imbecile.
Are you saying we shouldn't be naming streets after white people just because they're white? This anti-white mantra (also known as multiculturalism) has got to go. If a person deserves to have his/her name on a street sign, then they deserve it. Even if they are white. Sorry I've had enough with political correctness.
AoD
 

drum118

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I see the contractor has slow down again and lets see if Kipling is fully built by the end of the year, as well Bloor St. Don't look for any full sidewalk completion on any road as next to no work being done on them considering some were form for concrete over 2 months ago.

Had a look on Sunday and surprise how uncompleted Kipling is, considering the rate the contractor was building it in Sept and Oct.

All of Kipling southbound lanes pour south of Bloor St as well 90% of the 2nd lane for Bloor St to the west. The north side of Bloor including Kipling stake for concrete curb pouring, but only 60% of Bloor is ready for concrete. Don'ting done for Dundas at all.

The missing section on Dundas west of Kipling is pour and waiting asphalt along with Kipling and Bloor. Lack of sidewalk is a major issue as well safety, considering winter is here. Will all of this project be finish in 2020 or is it going to go into 2021??
 

mrxbombastic

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TORONTO is not one of the street names chosen. Seriously, the issue at hand is the chosen names, don't change the subject.
In case you don't know (I'll give the benefit of the doubt here), colonialism in Canada systematically eliminated aboriginal names, places, languages and symbols off the map of this country. It's a fact. Read the Indian Act, all the reports on Truth and Reconciliation, Residential Schools etc and you will know the irrevocable damage done to Indigenous peoples of this land.

A small part of reconciliation with aboriginal peoples, something which all governments in Canada embrace, is bringing back aboriginal heritage and existence into the land. Naming streets like this is one way to do this and it recognizes that Aboriginal peoples were on this land long before anyone sailed over from Europe, and that they are still here living side by side with us. It's a street for god sakes, a small one at that.

You probably wont live on it and wont care in a year or two but for someone living there or passing by it could have the tinniest of impacts and draw a question of what it means,. Wouldn't that be nice? It's like wondering what Broadview means and then getting to Riverdale park and it all clicking together...

There is nothing but good that can come from this. PS: Adobigok = Etobicoke, if you didn't figure that out already.
 

raptor

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In case you don't know (I'll give the benefit of the doubt here), colonialism in Canada systematically eliminated aboriginal names, places, languages and symbols off the map of this country. It's a fact. Read the Indian Act, all the reports on Truth and Reconciliation, Residential Schools etc and you will know the irrevocable damage done to Indigenous peoples of this land.

A small part of reconciliation with aboriginal peoples, something which all governments in Canada embrace, is bringing back aboriginal heritage and existence into the land. Naming streets like this is one way to do this and it recognizes that Aboriginal peoples were on this land long before anyone sailed over from Europe, and that they are still here living side by side with us. It's a street for god sakes, a small one at that.

You probably wont live on it and wont care in a year or two but for someone living there or passing by it could have the tinniest of impacts and draw a question of what it means,. Wouldn't that be nice? It's like wondering what Broadview means and then getting to Riverdale park and it all clicking together...

There is nothing but good that can come from this. PS: Adobigok = Etobicoke, if you didn't figure that out already.
So you think aboroginal people will forgive us for taking their land by naming a couple of streets with aboriginal names? grow up, this is a sham just to make people feel better about themselves.
 

crs1026

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So you think aboroginal people will forgive us for taking their land by naming a couple of streets with aboriginal names? grow up, this is a sham just to make people feel better about themselves.
Well, you gotta start somewhere. I agree, it’s not enough. I agree too that we often see trivial token gestures that are accompanied by self-congratulation and victory declarations and complacency when they haven’t really moved us forward very much. But the alternative (ie another post-colonial naming) gets us nowhere. So maybe just breaking that habit is a step forward.

I am somewhat familiar with the research and small-c consultation that goes on before street names are shortlisted.. I was disappointed at the superficiality of these particular choices. Were these names vetted with anyone with a knowledge of First Nations heritage? Are they the place names that the First Nations would most like to see added to our public consciousness? Ought there not to be street names derived from people or events in First Nations ? I would be happier if the street were named for a respected former chief or elder from local first nations, or some event (historical or from mythology) that resonates more. If I knew that something was important to Indigenous residents of Etobicoke, I would make that a priority.

In that vein, if the proposed names aren’t the right choices - what are? What are the top-ten heritage sites or features of Etobicoke that deserve to have their indigenous heritage brought to the fore? We have the Carrying Place Trail, but surely there is more.

From what I have read, Six Points was just a pretty obscure hillside that was mostly visited while hunting, but it wasn’t a landmark or a habitation site. Maybe some bland post-colonial name is all it deserves. But increasing the profile of the Indigenous legacy in this city ought to be a priority.

- Paul
 

Towered

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No, I am clearly not saying that. Sure, white guys should get streets named after them too, but you seem to want to stop street names that aren't derived from a British past. Your notion of what Canada is is problematically out-of-date. It's not too late to open yourself up to things you're ignorant of, you're still alive, new can be fun and it's always enlightening.

42
I bet he loves Ontario's current flag too...
 

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