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Roads: Ontario/GTA Highways Discussion

gweed123

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robmausser

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I actually agree with this. Tolling the 407 East makes sense, but I've always thought the two N-S connector highways should be free. The Mayor's point about lanes being added to the 427 and 410 (both of which are free) is a good one.
Yes I found it odd that the 412 and 418 were tolled.

The 407 is a toll road, no question thats its purpose. It is an alternative to another highway (401)

But the 412/418 will be like the 427/404, etc in coming years.

That being said im pro-toll for the DVP and Gardiner. But thats due to Toronto being a mega city that has limited space for the density of population. People should be incentivized to take GO into toronto and the money from those tolls should go directly to improving GO.

The 412/418 is a ruralish area, its different.
 

gweed123

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Yes I found it odd that the 412 and 418 were tolled.

The 407 is a toll road, no question thats its purpose. It is an alternative to another highway (401)

But the 412/418 will be like the 427/404, etc in coming years.

That being said im pro-toll for the DVP and Gardiner. But thats due to Toronto being a mega city that has limited space for the density of population. People should be incentivized to take GO into toronto and the money from those tolls should go directly to improving GO.

The 412/418 is a ruralish area, its different.
Agreed completely. Tolls should only be implemented for 3 reasons:

1) To create a congestion-free (or less congested) alternative to an existing route that is experiencing congestion.
2) To help cover the costs of a big-ticket piece of infrastructure (ex: Confederation Bridge).
3) To help shift demand to alternative modes of transportation.

The 407 is clearly #1. Tolls on the DVP & Gardiner would be #3 (which I support).

While the 412 and 418 were by no means cheap, I don't think that rural highways that are each 10-15km long qualify as truly "big ticket items". Removing tolls off those highways would shift traffic from collectors and arterial roads onto the freeway network, which I would say is a good thing.
 

W. K. Lis

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From link.

The Burlington Skyway opened on Oct. 30, 1958. To defray the $17-million cost of construction, drivers were charged 15 cents per trip, trucks with two axles or cars with trailers, 25 cents, and trucks with three or more axles, 45 cents. An automated system of dropping coins (or a token) into a metal collector bin was abandoned in 1964 because too many drivers were missing the bin. A toll was collected until 1973.
The Garden City Skyway is a major high-level bridge located in St. Catharines and Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, that allows the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) to cross the Welland Canal without the interruption of a lift bridge. Six lanes of traffic are carried across the bridge, which is 2.2 kilometres (1.4 mi)[2] in length and 40 metres (130 ft) at its tallest point. It is the tallest and largest single structure along the entire QEW; the Burlington Bay James N. Allan Skyway, which is also part of the QEW, is actually two separate and smaller four-lane bridge
Construction began in January 1960, with the main span crossing the Welland Canal hoisted into place in July of that same year. The bridge was open to traffic on October 18, 1963. During construction, the bridge was referred to as the Homer Skyway, taking its name from the lift bridge that the new skyway was to replace. Upon dedication, the bridge was officially named the Garden City Skyway, using the nickname of St. Catharines, "Canada's Garden City."

Tolls were charged on the bridge until 1973.
From 1958 to 1973 is 15 years of collecting tolls. Highway 407 opened in 1997. Think it is more than 15 years.
 

kali

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They toll was $0.15 in 1958, or $1.36 today with inflation.

As the bridge is about 3km long, that works out to about $0.45 cents per km.

This is significantly higher than the 407 east, and only slightly lower than the 407ETR peak rates.
Ah okay, I knew I would trip over the inflation.
 

Isotack

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They toll was $0.15 in 1958, or $1.36 today with inflation.

As the bridge is about 3km long, that works out to about $0.45 cents per km.

This is significantly higher than the 407 east, and only slightly lower than the 407ETR peak rates.
You're comparing a toll from 50 years ago ...on a bridge that unless you are completely lost...you would likely pay twice per day? To a highway which is over 100km long? So if you took the highway for a typical trip, and no it's not 3 km...that's your toll justification? Now I've heard everything...lol
 

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