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Dollarama

I vividly remember about 4 years ago, a car drove through the front of the Dollarama here in Scarborough (Morningside Crossing).
The car must have been having difficulties backing up as well, since it then reversed into the side of the nearby Food Basics.

As to my knowledge, no one was hurt (thankfully). Renovations went underway immediately and the store remained open with the
damaged section (the windows that the car drove through were facing the aisles near the right end of the store) closed off temporarily.
 
Dollarama reports higher third-quarter profit, sales

The Canadian Press

Sales in the quarter totalled $947.6 million, up from $864.3 million.

Analysts on average had expected sales of $936.8 million and a profit of 45 cents per share, according to financial markets data firm Refinitiv.

New stores helped boost sales. Dollarama added 21 net new stores in the quarter -- up from 14 in the same quarter last year -- for a total count of 1,271 as of Nov. 3. It remains on track to open between 60 and 70 net new stores in this financial year as it works to grow to 1,700 locations in Canada by 2027.

 
Dollarama reports higher third-quarter profit, sales

The Canadian Press

Sales in the quarter totalled $947.6 million, up from $864.3 million.

Analysts on average had expected sales of $936.8 million and a profit of 45 cents per share, according to financial markets data firm Refinitiv.

New stores helped boost sales. Dollarama added 21 net new stores in the quarter -- up from 14 in the same quarter last year -- for a total count of 1,271 as of Nov. 3. It remains on track to open between 60 and 70 net new stores in this financial year as it works to grow to 1,700 locations in Canada by 2027.

Dollarama does really well when some other retailers are failing.
 
Dollarama does really well when some other retailers are failing.
Dollar Stores are hugely destructive to small town retail.


In small towns and urban neighborhoods alike, dollar stores are triggering the closure of grocery stores, eliminating jobs, and further eroding the prospects of the vulnerable communities they target. These chains both rely on and fuel the growing economic precarity and widening inequality that plague America.

As local grocery stores disappear, some communities are left with only dollar stores for buying food. Although most dollar stores sell only a limited selection of processed foods and no fresh produce, dollar stores are now feeding more Americans than Whole Foods is.
 
The 1139 College St (west of Dufferin) location is getting closer to opening:

20191230_105409.jpg
 
Basement real estate costs less. You need less turnover to pay your bills.

That's true but Dollerama is no longer a destination unto itself and being in a dingy basement is not helping. There was one at Eglinton Square that actually went from the basement to the main floor. The one at Yonge and Bloor is underground in the former Fabricland space and is quite unwelcoming not mention cramped.

Honestly, Dollerama is not worth it anymore when you can buy comparable if not better merchandise for a very similar price at Wal-Mart.The quality of the merchandise at Dollerama has remained the same as it was but the prices have gone up. Why spend 3 dollars on things at Dollarama when I can buy better stuff at Wal-MArt for a dollar or so more.
 
BiWay also had bargain locations. They had basement locations at Shoppers World and Bramalea City Centre, and located their main Brampton store in an old tannery warehouse on McMurchy Avenue. I don't remember where a lot of the BiWay stores were in Toronto, but I recall a few locations, like the last holdout in New Toronto, being in run down storefronts in lower-income neighbourhoods, like Weston, Cabbagetown, and Keelesdale. The main rival at the time, Bargain Harold's, tended to be in old Woolworth stores.

Dollarama, despite preferring bargain locations, has decided to locate in neighbourhoods that BiWay would have never considered.
 
BiWay also had bargain locations. They had basement locations at Shoppers World and Bramalea City Centre, and located their main Brampton store in an old tannery warehouse on McMurchy Avenue. I don't remember where a lot of the BiWay stores were in Toronto, but I recall a few locations, like the last holdout in New Toronto, being in run down storefronts in lower-income neighbourhoods, like Weston, Cabbagetown, and Keelesdale. The main rival at the time, Bargain Harold's, tended to be in old Woolworth stores.

We had it all at Mountain Plaza Mall in Hamilton: Woolco, BiWay, *and* Bargain Harold's. And Dutch Toko, for when you needed to buy wooden shoes.
 
in locations. They had basement locations at Shoppers World and Bramalea City Centre, and located their main Brampton store in an old tannery warehouse on McMurchy Avenue. I don't remember where a lot of the BiWay stores were in Toronto, but I recall a few locations, like the last holdout in New Toronto, being in run-down storefronts in lower-income neighbourhoods, like Weston, Cabbagetown, and Keelesdale. The main rival at the time, Bargain Harold's, tended to be in old Woolworth stores.
The Annex's Dollarama was Sonic Boom Records prior. However, previous to that it was a BiWay if memory serves. Super close to Honest Ed's too.
 
Just a thought-

With all the Dollaramas/Dollar Trees/Family Dollars/Poundlands popping up around Western countries, I sort of wonder if this is just a late-stage manifestation of the consumer's desire for cheap stuff, or just another manifestation of the "five-and-ten cent" stores.

These aren't even a discount chains with their own identities anymore (i.e. a brand like Walmart/Woolworth's/KMart/Giant Tiger/Winners that happens to be cheaper than an average store) - in its name, the store identity revolves around the immediacy of cheapness.

There is no upmarket aspiration of finding 'decent stuff for cheap'; that pretense is stripped away - instead, the products are defined by their price first and foremost.

Interesting phenomenon though, and there's probably been studies already about the causes and effects of these stores.
 
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Just a thought-

With all the Dollaramas/Dollar Trees/Family Dollars/Poundlands popping up around Western countries, I sort of wonder if this is just a late-stage manifestation of the consumer's desire for cheap stuff, or just another manifestation of the "five-and-ten cent" stores.

These aren't even a discount chains with their own identities anymore (i.e. a brand like Walmart/Woolworth's/KMart/Giant Tiger/Winners that happens to be cheaper than an average store) - in its name, the store identity revolves around the immediacy of cheapness.

There is no upmarket aspiration of finding 'decent stuff for cheap'; that pretense is stripped away - instead, the products are defined by their price first and foremost.

Interesting phenomenon though, and there's probably been studies already about the causes and effects of these stores.

It is a common theme as nobody expects high quality, only disposable items. To be fair though Giant Tiger only sells trash, Wal-Mart is no longer as cheap as it once was and Winners is too hit or miss to be of any value.
 

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