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Crosstown LRT | Metrolinx

Northern Light

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On the subject of hill collapse..........may I offer a post of mine from the Toronto Tree thread from earlier this year:


From said post:

The choice to keep as many and wide car lanes as they did, and bring the Crosstown up/outside at this location, in this way, resulted in the need/desire for the retaining walls (the bottom of the slope was removed for road-widening resulting in slope stability issues.)

In my, ahem, non-professional opinion, This: (image from The Star, at this link) https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/20...ves-neighbours-worried-about-their-homes.html, need not have happened.
1603370556673.png


Putting aside that I fundamentally disagreed with the design here: There a few important rules to keeping slopes stable, if you cut down their trees and undercut their toe.

1) Leave the tree stumps; the roots will continue to hold the ground for awhile, likely several months or longer before they rot so much that they no longer help adhesion

2) Resupport the toe as soon as possible

3) Don't get the ground get saturated (tarp it)

Just sayin......
 
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micheal_can

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On the subject of hill collapse..........may I offer a post of mine from the Toronto Tree thread from earlier this year:


From said post:

The choice to keep as many and wide car lanes as they did, and bring the Crosstown up/outside at this location, in this way, resulted in the need/desire for the retaining walls (the bottom of the slope was removed for road-widening resulting in slope stability issues.)

In my, ahem, non-professional opinion, This: (image from The Star, at this link) https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/20...ves-neighbours-worried-about-their-homes.html, need not have happened.
View attachment 278333

Putting aside that I fundamentally disagreed with the design here: There a few important rules to keeping slopes stable, if you cut down their trees and undercut their toe.

1) Leave the tree stumps; the roots will continue to hold the ground for awhile, likely several months or longer before they rot so much that they no longer help adhesion

2) Resupport the toe as soon as possible

3) Don't get the ground get saturated (tarp it)

Just sayin......
The issue with leaving stumps is that when they rote, they leave a void. Now you have new problem.
 

Northern Light

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The issue with leaving stumps is that when they rote, they leave a void. Now you have new problem.
If one were intending to retain the original slope grade, above any retaining wall, leaving the stumps would be an appropriate, interim measure.

In this particular case, its my understanding they removed a large portion of the hill all together with the intention of regrading it.

As such, retaining the stumps was not viable.

What was viable was rebuilding the retaining structures forthwith; and replanting forthwith and neither of those was done.

Absent that; at the very least, I would have thought they would have tarped the slope to prevent saturation of the soil which is a common industry practice.

The geotechnical engineers can issue their report later; but at first blush, this appears to be a case of the top layer of soil becoming saturated and slipping off of the more compact clay layer below.
 

Northern Light

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Did they just remove the hill without stabilizing it?
They did take measures to stabilize it.

But they weren't the finished product measures.

Also, they didn't tarp the slope.

****

What they did here wasn't really egregious, bad outcome aside.

I'm somewhat harsh here, in part, because I very much dislike the design choices made in the first place; though I conceded my preferred option would have been materially more expensive.

Be that as it may.

I think the way in which this was phased was less than ideal; and tarping would have been highly desirable; and while one can't be certain, I think it likely those actions would have mitigated the risk of collapse.

In fairness, the entire slope project to this point is only around a six month timeline. Still, I think it could have been compressed.
 

crs1026

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Look Mon, we are running on rail through a station still being built.......None of walls or roof are form or pour and they are talking about putting rail down now. Geee!!

What going to power that train when no overhead system is in place since nothing there to support it at this time???
My reaction when I saw the tweet was similar to @drum118 's - there's an awful lot of exposed rebar remaining for anyone to be celebrating victory. But I don't know enough about their construction logic - it may be that having the track bed laid lets them move on to other things or gives them mobility within the site. Even stretching the rail without actually laying it might be a big step forward depending on where the rail is now and how getting that done lets other things get advanced.

What struck me as much more indicative of progress is the notice about demobilization of the Caledonia station crane. That means a certain number of things have been completed.

As to the soil movement - what caught my eye is how more than one article/tweet used a photo of the underpinned Line 1 crossing in conjunction with the event. That took my breath away, until I read further and realised that the event wasn't connected to those crossings. The embankment movement is bad enough, but it's fixable and really not that big a delay. Any event that actually affected the crossings would be a much bigger deal. I thought the authors of those items were sensationalising, although only us sidewalk supervisors may have cared. Joe Public might not have ever noticed.

- Paul
 

drum118

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Sorry! Out of service. Use steps.
More like you will have to wait until the system to open in 2 years or so to use it, considering most Metrolinx projects have elevators opening months late after the project goes into service. Haven't heard or seen on Mount Dennis elevators considering that area been mostly done late last year. Keele should be next.
 

W. K. Lis

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More like you will have to wait until the system to open in 2 years or so to use it, considering most Metrolinx projects have elevators opening months late after the project goes into service. Haven't heard or seen on Mount Dennis elevators considering that area been mostly done late last year. Keele should be next.
Expected. See what happened when back in 2018, six months after the Line 1 was extended.

Woman in wheelchair feels 'shafted' over broken TTC elevator at new Vaughan station

From link.

Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Station has had a broken elevator ever since it opened 6 months ago (May 2018)



An advocate for people with disabilities says she's "pissed off" that an elevator at the new subway station in Vaughan still isn't working, six months after it opened.

The elevator in question is the only one at Vaughan Metropolitan Centre that takes TTC customers to the area in the station where York Region Transit buses pick up and drop off passengers.

"The stairs for the able-bodied are open. They are great; people use them all the time," said Emily Daigle, who uses a wheelchair herself and has been been an advocate for accessibility for nearly 30 years.

"But people with wheelchairs? Nah, we're are out of luck," she said.
"Yet again, we feel like second-class citizens because we pay the same fare that everybody else does, but we get shafted because literally we can't get up the elevator shaft," Daigle told CBC Toronto.

The TTC says the elevator has been shut down because of a water leak in the attached bus stop.
It was supposed to be commissioned in December. Unfortunately, until we fix that leak we can't get the elevators up," spokesperson Stuart Green said.

"Right now, there is a way to get between the two but it's not as convenient as it should be and we'll get that fixed."

Fed up, Daigle brought her concerns to a TTC commissioners meeting earlier this week.

Councillors were surprised to hear of the elevator issue, with one calling it "kind of sad and pathetic."

They promised action.

But Daigle says she still feels the sting, and claims the councillors don't truly understand what she and others with disabilities have to go through.
"Not one of those councillors on that commission ... is full-time wheelchair. Not one person on city council in Toronto is a person in a wheelchair," she said.

Right now, 43 of the TTC's 75 stations have elevators designed for people using wheelchairs, walkers, strollers and other mobility devices.

The TTC says it is committed to make all stations accessible by 2025.
Don't think the surface stops have to worry about elevators. One reason to duplicate the elevators at the underground stations, in case of elevator failure.
 

drum118

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Expected. See what happened when back in 2018, six months after the Line 1 was extended.

Woman in wheelchair feels 'shafted' over broken TTC elevator at new Vaughan station

From link.

Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Station has had a broken elevator ever since it opened 6 months ago (May 2018)











Don't think the surface stops have to worry about elevators. One reason to duplicate the elevators at the underground stations, in case of elevator failure.
This is the very reason I bitch about not having 2 elevators in place of one. Seen systems with 3. This folks are being screw over in the name of $$ or don't care at all.

As a note, they are planning to rebuilt Port Credit Centre platform elevator and that westbound platform will most likely be out of service for months and a rider will have to go to Clarkson to get a train westbound. If by bus to get to Clarkson, an extra 20-40 minute trip each way.
 
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ViveleCanada

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Expected. See what happened when back in 2018, six months after the Line 1 was extended.

Woman in wheelchair feels 'shafted' over broken TTC elevator at new Vaughan station

From link.

Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Station has had a broken elevator ever since it opened 6 months ago (May 2018)











Don't think the surface stops have to worry about elevators. One reason to duplicate the elevators at the underground stations, in case of elevator failure.
I found this article sort of sensationalized a really minor issue as the VMC station was completely accessible on opening day. The elevators in question were the elevators connecting the station with the VIVA station. The main elevator connecting the station to street level was operational the day the station opened so there was still an accessible route from the station to the VIVA station; albeit you had to cross an intersection. While annoying, this is sort of an issue when using any VIVA stop and the path through the tunnel to the VIVA station isn't much faster than going outside.

I think the bigger issue this article should have reported on is that every single station on the TYSSE extension (excl. Pioneer Village) only have a single elevator going down to the platform.
 

44 North

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My reaction when I saw the tweet was similar to @drum118 's - there's an awful lot of exposed rebar remaining for anyone to be celebrating victory. But I don't know enough about their construction logic - it may be that having the track bed laid lets them move on to other things or gives them mobility within the site. Even stretching the rail without actually laying it might be a big step forward depending on where the rail is now and how getting that done lets other things get advanced.
Sorry but just reading what you wrote and interpreting it differently, wonder if the rails could become a means for construction. No more concrete trucks and dump trucks clogging area roads during station construction. Use the rails to bring everything in and out. Materials, workers even. Build stations from the inside out. Maybe build the stations in consecutive order so we don't have a dozen construction sites lasting a decade. Have the rails first, and let's use them to our advantage.
 

micheal_can

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I found this article sort of sensationalized a really minor issue as the VMC station was completely accessible on opening day. The elevators in question were the elevators connecting the station with the VIVA station. The main elevator connecting the station to street level was operational the day the station opened so there was still an accessible route from the station to the VIVA station; albeit you had to cross an intersection. While annoying, this is sort of an issue when using any VIVA stop and the path through the tunnel to the VIVA station isn't much faster than going outside.

I think the bigger issue this article should have reported on is that every single station on the TYSSE extension (excl. Pioneer Village) only have a single elevator going down to the platform.
How about they also shut down stairs that are next to the elevators that are broken. Why? To show the able bodied people that it isn't that simple.
 

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