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TTC: Other Items (catch all)

W. K. Lis

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While the TTC has commissioners on its board who don't use public transit, it's the same elsewhere...

A major malfunction at Major Mackenzie Drive



York Region’s latest bus rapid transit project has a major flaw at Major Mackenzie Drive in Richmond Hill

From link.

On December 20, 2020, the newest section of York Region’s Viva Rapidways opened for service on Yonge Street between Highway 7 and Major Mackenzie Drive. I have been critical of York Region’s rapid transit projects for several reasons: they are underutilized, they are poorly designed for pedestrians, and without frequent service and convenient connecting routes, the money spent on fancy new infrastructure ends up becoming a questionable investment.


At least the new Yonge Street Rapidway would serve York Region’s busiest transit corridor, supporting new high-density development in Richmond Hill. Unlike on Highway 7 or in Newmarket, there are no two-phase pedestrian crossings on this part of Yonge. Unfortunately, a botched connection between the new Rapidway at Major Mackenzie Drive created a new problem for the YRT/Viva transit network.


This issue — along with the other problems with York Region’s Rapidways that I discussed previously — should be held up as lessons on what not to do when building new transit rights-of-way in street medians, be it on Hurontario Street in Mississauga and Brampton, planned BRT lines on Dundas Street in Mississauga, or Queen Street in Brampton.
Though Yonge Street is wide enough for dedicated bus lanes, along with bike lanes and two general traffic lanes between Highway 7 and Major Mackenzie, the roadway narrows through Richmond Hill’s historic downtown. Through Downtown Richmond Hill, Viva buses and cyclists rejoin general traffic, and parking is permitted in the curb lanes outside of weekday rush hours.
y2-majormac-intersection.jpg

Schematic of new Major Mackenzie Viva bus stop at Yonge Street – access is only permitted from the south, at Hopkins Street/Elmwood Avenue (from VivaNext website)

Because of this traffic constraint, the Viva bus stops are located one block south of Major Mackenzie, at the intersection of Yonge Street and Elmwood Avenue and Hopkins Street. Pedestrians intending to get to the Viva bus stops from Major Mackenzie Drive and Downtown Richmond Hill must walk that extra block south on the sidewalk, push the beg button to cross Yonge Street at Elmwood/Hopkins and backtrack to the bus platform.
img_2544-001.jpg

Pedestrian crosses Yonge Street from the Major Mackenzie Drive intersection. This is the fastest and most direct route to the new Viva stops, but it is prohibited – pedestrians are expected to walk down to the next traffic lights, push the beg button and wait for a walk signal to cross and backtrack to the stop platforms.

To dissuade pedestrians from making the shorter, direct route across Yonge Street north of the Viva stop, temporary barriers were set up, an indication that natural human behaviour was not thought out during the design phase. YRT transit enforcement officers are regularly stationed as well to lay jaywalking charges against those who try to take the shortest path, including those transferring from east-west buses on Major Mackenzie.
img_2559-001.jpg

Looking north towards Major Mackenzie Drive – note the temporary “no pedestrian access” signs on the north side of the platform

This poor design is especially bad considering that this is one of the busiest transfer points on Yonge Street in York Region. Combined, Routes 4 and 25 make Major Mackenzie Drive the busiest and most frequent conventional (i.e., non-Viva) transit corridor in York Region. Therefore, hundreds of transit riders must walk longer distances and cross more lanes of traffic than previously when the curbside Viva stops were adjacent to the intersection.
The second busiest conventional route is 20 Jane, which connects to the new Vaughan hospital site, Vaughan Mills mall, the subway and (via an unnecessarily long walk) York University. A new Viva route was planned to serve the Jane and Major Mackenzie corridors between Vaughan Metropolitan Centre station and Richmond Hill GO Station, just east of Yonge Street, originally planned to commence with the opening of the subway extension, which occurred in December 2017. However, Viva Silver’s start date has been delayed several times; as of February 2021, there is no indication on when service would begin. When Viva Silver service finally begins, this will be an even busier transfer point.
img_2552-001.jpg

The sanctioned access point to the Major Mackenzie Drive Viva bus stop, where pedestrians must beg to get to the bus platforms

If you need to put up temporary barriers and deploy enforcement officers to ticket your own customers trying to access your service, you probably made some serious mistakes. User-centred design must be part of any transit project, and transit riders must be made to feel as welcome as possible. Once again, York Region got this wrong. Hopefully, future transit projects learn from these mistakes, rather than repeat them.
 

drum118

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TTC Line 1 Subway and Berwick Avenue Road Closure for Eglinton Crosstown LRT Construction Work

March 6 – March 8, 2021​

cab7eb25-8ac2-432e-82f0-d4942c50594d.png

From Saturday March 6 – Monday March 8, 2021, Berwick Avenue will be closed at Yonge Street to facilitate pre-cast concrete panel installations and associated architectural works for the new TTC Line 1 Facility Service Building. This work will coincide with a closure of TTC’s Line 1 Subway between Finch and St. Clair Stations on March 6 and 7 2021. The Hillsdale Avenue Bridge north sidewalk and lane, located between Duplex Avenue and Yonge Street, will remain open while this work takes place.

Work will take place on a 24-hour basis. TTC buses entering the Eglinton Station Bus Bay will enter from Yonge Street. A Paid Duty Officer will be on site to assist TTC bus traffic. All property access is expected to be maintained, except for four commercial parking spaces to the east of 34 Berwick Ave.

Please note that this work is subject to cancellation. TTC closures may go ahead even in the event of the road closure cancellation. For more information, please visit www.ttc.ca


What to Expect​

Noise from construction activity, including trucks and a crane can be expected. All work zones on Yonge Street and Eglinton Avenue will remain in place​


Hours of Work​

  • Saturday March 6 – Monday March 8, 2021 Berwick Avenue will be closed at Yonge Street from 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. each day.​

  • Work will take place on 24-hour basis.​

Traffic and Pedestrian Details​

  • Berwick Ave will be closed at Yonge St
  • On-street parking will be temporarily prohibited
  • Access to Canada Square parking lot will be maintained from Duplex Ave only; access to 2180 Yonge St loading dock and TTC Bus Bay from Berwick Avenue will be maintained from Yonge St only.
  • Pedestrian access will be maintained along the north side of Berwick Ave from Duplex Ave to Yonge St. At times, pedestrians may be asked to stop or divert around the crane movements.
  • The south sidewalk of Berwick Ave from Yonge St to the west end of the work zone will be temporarily closed.

TTC Details​

  • TTC Line 1 subway will be closed on Saturday March 6 and Sunday March 7, 2021 between Finch and St. Clair stations. Please visit TTC’s website www.ttc.ca, under “Service Advisories” for more information on subway closures and shuttle bus operation.​

 

drum118

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While the TTC has commissioners on its board who don't use public transit, it's the same elsewhere...

A major malfunction at Major Mackenzie Drive



York Region’s latest bus rapid transit project has a major flaw at Major Mackenzie Drive in Richmond Hill

From link.



y2-majormac-intersection.jpg

Schematic of new Major Mackenzie Viva bus stop at Yonge Street – access is only permitted from the south, at Hopkins Street/Elmwood Avenue (from VivaNext website)


img_2544-001.jpg

Pedestrian crosses Yonge Street from the Major Mackenzie Drive intersection. This is the fastest and most direct route to the new Viva stops, but it is prohibited – pedestrians are expected to walk down to the next traffic lights, push the beg button and wait for a walk signal to cross and backtrack to the stop platforms.


img_2559-001.jpg

Looking north towards Major Mackenzie Drive – note the temporary “no pedestrian access” signs on the north side of the platform



img_2552-001.jpg

The sanctioned access point to the Major Mackenzie Drive Viva bus stop, where pedestrians must beg to get to the bus platforms
Is it a FLAW??

Need to go back around 2000's and look at what RH was looking at in the way of getting transit through the downtown area that is narrow.

At a Big Move meeting I was asked to sit in with RH folks, we talked about various options of getting transit through the downtown to the point they had been looking at a tunnel starting south of Major Mack and surfacing at a number of locations north of the Downtown where the road was wider.

There was the thought that the tunnel could be for transit only with stations to 4-6 lanes to take through traffic under the Town and leaving the surface for local use.

The best option as far as I am concern is a 4-6 lane tunnel with stations that will have to be deep to get under the existing foundations so stations can be built. The tunnel will be able to support an LRT down the road like the BRT will.

By having the station where it is, allows the ability to have this tunnel without ripping the whole intersection and buildings up to put this tunnel in at some point in time.

Anyway, wrong thread.
 

ARG1

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Is it a FLAW??

Need to go back around 2000's and look at what RH was looking at in the way of getting transit through the downtown area that is narrow.

At a Big Move meeting I was asked to sit in with RH folks, we talked about various options of getting transit through the downtown to the point they had been looking at a tunnel starting south of Major Mack and surfacing at a number of locations north of the Downtown where the road was wider.

There was the thought that the tunnel could be for transit only with stations to 4-6 lanes to take through traffic under the Town and leaving the surface for local use.

The best option as far as I am concern is a 4-6 lane tunnel with stations that will have to be deep to get under the existing foundations so stations can be built. The tunnel will be able to support an LRT down the road like the BRT will.

By having the station where it is, allows the ability to have this tunnel without ripping the whole intersection and buildings up to put this tunnel in at some point in time.

Anyway, wrong thread.
Just because there is a justification doesn't make it any less of a flaw. If the station requires the pedestrian to walk 200m to connect to a local bus (roughly the distance of the Spadina tunnel), wait through 2 crossing signals, and the layout pushes pedestrians to take dangerous shortcuts, its a flawed design. Flawed doesn't necessarily mean there isn't any merit to how its designed, it just means that there are serious issues with how its designed.
 

Steve X

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Is it a FLAW??

Need to go back around 2000's and look at what RH was looking at in the way of getting transit through the downtown area that is narrow.

At a Big Move meeting I was asked to sit in with RH folks, we talked about various options of getting transit through the downtown to the point they had been looking at a tunnel starting south of Major Mack and surfacing at a number of locations north of the Downtown where the road was wider.

There was the thought that the tunnel could be for transit only with stations to 4-6 lanes to take through traffic under the Town and leaving the surface for local use.

The best option as far as I am concern is a 4-6 lane tunnel with stations that will have to be deep to get under the existing foundations so stations can be built. The tunnel will be able to support an LRT down the road like the BRT will.

By having the station where it is, allows the ability to have this tunnel without ripping the whole intersection and buildings up to put this tunnel in at some point in time.

Anyway, wrong thread.
How about they put the cars in the tunnel and leave the buses on dedicated lanes on the surface? Or just close the street off from cars all together.

This is way off topic and York Region haven't had enough success in transit to be doing such a move.
 

Northern Light

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There's a tender out for modifying the Brown's Line and Lakeshore intersection; on the TTC website.

The brief description leaves me wondering why its a TTC contract as opposed to a City one.

https://www.merx.com/ttc/solicitati...0192631?purchasingGroupId=1177575101&origin=1

Looking at TOInview, I see this project appears to be for a queue-jump lane; a seemingly odd investment for a streetcar route.

The purple dot below shows you which Brown's line Intersection is in play.

1614266232226.png


In Streetview, its this area:

1614266331357.png
 

Amare

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Im curious to see how this would even work. Eastbound streetcars currently get held up by traffic turning onto Brown's Line, but more significantly by traffic turning into the No Frills plaza on 37th street.
 

Steve X

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Im curious to see how this would even work. Eastbound streetcars currently get held up by traffic turning onto Brown's Line, but more significantly by traffic turning into the No Frills plaza on 37th street.
Probably something similar to Leslie/Lakeshore
 

nfitz

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Expect an increase for Toronto in 2022, when the Line 5 Crosstown LRT is added to it. A further, but smaller, increase in 2023, when the Line 6 Finch West LRT is added as well.
Presumably they'd list that separately - if at all. They don't list Line 4, now.
 

Coolstar

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Wait wth. Ottawa is number 1? That's crazy. Talk about pent up demand.

(also why can I only see your image on mobile?)
To be fair, Ottawa's system is more of a Light Metro than an LRT line. Keep in mind the line is fully grade-separated plus the line is equipped with ATC/ATO throughout the full route. All the more reason REM-style vehicles should've been used. Nice to see our streetcar system surpassed the C-Train in Calgary. The last time I checked, Calgary was ahead of us in terms of ridership per mile.
 

44 North

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To be fair, Ottawa's system is more of a Light Metro than an LRT line. Keep in mind the line is fully grade-separated plus the line is equipped with ATC/ATO throughout the full route. All the more reason REM-style vehicles should've been used. Nice to see our streetcar system surpassed the C-Train in Calgary. The last time I checked, Calgary was ahead of us in terms of ridership per mile.

Yes I'd also like to see it stacked among N.Am subway systems. Using their existing ridership/mile metric it'd certainly be up there.
 

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