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Transit Fantasy Maps

adrianaliu

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brt is so op in the suburbs. living in ottawa right now and i love the way land is reserved for future transitways in their new subdivisions. brt is basically a cheap subway with more flexibility and less capacity so its perfect for the sparsely populated suburbs. imo finch hydro corridor brt should have been built all the way decades ago instead of sheppard subway, it would likely be undergoing conversion to lrt right now and would rival line 2 in terms of speed, the conversion not requiring property accquisition or tunneling.
 

robmausser

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brt is so op in the suburbs. living in ottawa right now and i love the way land is reserved for future transitways in their new subdivisions. brt is basically a cheap subway with more flexibility and less capacity so its perfect for the sparsely populated suburbs. imo finch hydro corridor brt should have been built all the way decades ago instead of sheppard subway, it would likely be undergoing conversion to lrt right now and would rival line 2 in terms of speed, the conversion not requiring property accquisition or tunneling.
The other advantage of BRT in lower density areas is the ability for buses to leave the transitway and drop people off at less nearby destinations, all without a transfer. This is vital in areas where things are further spread apart.
 

doady

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I think LRT and subway only makes sense for corridors with a lot of redevelopment potential. In Etobicoke, the corridors that fall into this category are Wilson-Albion, Eglinton, Dundas, The Queensway and Lakeshore. I don't think building LRT along a residential corridor like Finch or a hydro corridor makes much sense. We should expect a corridor to transform when we build LRT. The LRT should increase the density and concentrate people and jobs in a smaller area. Otherwise, it would be better to build BRT, which is cheaper and can serve people in a larger area.
 

adrianaliu

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also add
I think LRT and subway only makes sense for corridors with a lot of redevelopment potential. In Etobicoke, the corridors that fall into this category are Wilson-Albion, Eglinton, Dundas, The Queensway and Lakeshore. I don't think building LRT along a residential corridor like Finch or a hydro corridor makes much sense. We should expect a corridor to transform when we build LRT. The LRT should increase the density and concentrate people and jobs in a smaller area. Otherwise, it would be better to build BRT, which is cheaper and can serve people in a larger area.
if brt were built in the 80s or 90s in finch hydro corridor it would attract a degree of intensification and riders from connecting busses which would eventually justify lrt conversion, ottawa's transitways should be given more credit for some of the higher density developments nearby, if u look at the otrain route it really doesnt follow any traditional dense corridors. i think all brts should be built with eventual conversion in mind
 

WislaHD

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Ok, so where have they designed it well?
I will give you three excellent examples that cater to different markets.

Brisbane, Australia has designed a BRT system that can compete neck-and-neck with our Line 1 subway. Fun fact - they were inspired by Ottawa when they designed this one.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil has designed a BRT system that surpasses anything we are doing with LRTs in the Toronto region in terms of ridership, quality, and frequency, at a pretty good price given the amount of service being provided.

Cleveland, Ohio shows us what we could do on any arterial road in Toronto to upgrade our normal bus routes to something comparable to Finch LRT with minimal infrastructural investment.
 

micheal_can

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I will give you three excellent examples that cater to different markets.

Brisbane, Australia has designed a BRT system that can compete neck-and-neck with our Line 1 subway. Fun fact - they were inspired by Ottawa when they designed this one.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil has designed a BRT system that surpasses anything we are doing with LRTs in the Toronto region in terms of ridership, quality, and frequency, at a pretty good price given the amount of service being provided.

Cleveland, Ohio shows us what we could do on any arterial road in Toronto to upgrade our normal bus routes to something comparable to Finch LRT with minimal infrastructural investment.
And what about in Canada? We have/had many different BRT systems.
 

north-of-anything

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And what about in Canada? We have/had many different BRT systems.
Toronto shouldn't have to wait for some other Canadian city to do it well first. Given our cultural and environmental similarities to Cleveland, we should be looking to them if we need inspiration.

Hell, we don't even need to look outside the GTA. I love how the Mississauga Transitway is set up, and I've only ridden on it as part of a GO route. Had that been an LRT, that would have been either two needless transfers far from my destination, or just having to endure more highway traffic. I think at some point we just need to have something, because in my opinion a transit line that underestimates its ridership is better than the ROW being sold off for detached homes.
 

doady

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NYC's suburbs do everything they can to keep certain people out, including underfunding their bus services and overpricing their train services, trying to maintain a two-tier bus and train system, each with separate fares and schedules, so they definitely will not want any of NYC's subways.

It's nice to fantasize about a transit network that is based less on elitism and dividing people and more about integrating and connecting people, but it's not realistic in any way. The real world is much different from fantasy.
 

Streety McCarface

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NYC's suburbs do everything they can to keep certain people out, including underfunding their bus services and overpricing their train services, trying to maintain a two-tier bus and train system, each with separate fares and schedules, so they definitely will not want any of NYC's subways.

It's nice to fantasize about a transit network that is based less on elitism and dividing people and more about integrating and connecting people, but it's not realistic in any way. The real world is much different from fantasy.
Name one modern city that doesn't do this...
 
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