Love Park | 3m | 1s | City of Toronto

ViewfromtheLake

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Last pics from Friday's walk found me here, so pics are from June 10th, 2022:

We'll look at the entire site, but with a bit of focus on the mature trees.

View attachment 406936

In the pic above, the trees to the left and centre-left are indeed Chinese Elm, and it does look like they have Dutch Elm to me. Difficult to assess the overall state of those trees, but they will definitely look a bit rough this year.

The furthest tree (barely visible, against York St. is a Silver Maple)

The tree on the right is the one that will be on the Island in the water feature, the Northern Catalpa.

***

Below a closer look at the Catalpa:

View attachment 406934

Now a better look at the Chinese Elm:

View attachment 406933

In the above, you can see the one to the left is looking rather rough, but still very much alive, Dutch Elm can be deceiving, I've seen trees look this bad and fully recover; but not always.

The ones on the right seem much less affected.

****

View attachment 406932

View attachment 406930

View attachment 406929

View attachment 406928

Here we see (below) that the Catalpa is experiencing a small amount of die-back in the crown. I don't consider this something to be too worried about at this point, the tree looks pretty healthy over all;
could be an isolated injury to a branch, or just the stress of the construction, but should recover just fine.

View attachment 406927

View attachment 406926

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Dutch Elm. my first thought upon reading was that you had slipped ‘Dutch’ in by mistake re Dutch Elm Disease. But I think you are referring to the European hybrid elm? Is that correct? Regardless, the example is a lovely tree, hopefully not considered invasive.
 

Northern Light

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Dutch Elm. my first thought upon reading was that you had slipped ‘Dutch’ in by mistake re Dutch Elm Disease. But I think you are referring to the European hybrid elm? Is that correct? Regardless, the example is a lovely tree, hopefully not considered invasive.

The tree is Chinese Elm, and are moderately invasive. They are not considered a priority for removal in Toronto.

The disease is Dutch Elm, though, actually, probably originated in Asia.

But it was likely imported to North America via Europe.

It's been in North America since 1928.

It spread to Toronto in/around the 1960s and decimated the City's stock of Elm Trees (80% mortality)

Currently mortality is much less than that; both because of modern hybrids of Elms, but also because many of the surviving elms have a higher level of resistance to the disease.

Chinese Elms specifically are relatively resistant to Dutch Elm; though they can still show symptoms of it.
 

ViewfromtheLake

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The tree is Chinese Elm, and are moderately invasive. They are not considered a priority for removal in Toronto.

The disease is Dutch Elm, though, actually, probably originated in Asia.

But it was likely imported to North America via Europe.

It's been in North America since 1928.

It spread to Toronto in/around the 1960s and decimated the City's stock of Elm Trees (80% mortality)

Currently mortality is much less than that; both because of modern hybrids of Elms, but also because many of the surviving elms have a higher level of resistance to the disease.

Chinese Elms specifically are relatively resistant to Dutch Elm; though they can still show symptoms of it.
I know we are well off topic, but briefly, U of G has much on Elm restoration projects. Dutch Elm disease profoundly changed the landscapes in Ontario, especially rural Ontario, almost completely eliminating native elms. And on our farm - 100% loss, and quickly. I can remember family members discussing this when looking at photos of the farm now and then. And currently there are a couple of newer invasive fungal diseases, now prevalent in some areas of the USA, that would decimate oak and beech populations, again with no current method of control beyond cutting and burning.
 

Northern Light

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I know we are well off topic, but briefly, U of G has much on Elm restoration projects. Dutch Elm disease profoundly changed the landscapes in Ontario, especially rural Ontario, almost completely eliminating native elms. And on our farm - 100% loss, and quickly. I can remember family members discussing this when looking at photos of the farm now and then. And currently there are a couple of newer invasive fungal diseases, now prevalent in some areas of the USA, that would decimate oak and beech populations, again with no current method of control beyond cutting and burning.

I'm familiar w/the work at Guelph; and Oak Wilt and Beech Leaf disease; but may I suggest further detail on trees be taken over to the Toronto tree thread which can be found here:

 

BJT

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PXL_20220615_010328379.jpg
 

Northern Light

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I think every building should have a rooftop . Is it a thing in Toronto?

I'm sure you have a valid thought here, but LOL, it comes across a bit odd......

I'm confident most buildings do indeed have a roof........it would be rather wet inside if not!

Are you asking about Green Roofs?

If so, the answer is yes, there is a by-law on that..........though it doesn't yet cover all building types/sizes, and it doesn't require a 100% green roof.
 
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Northern Light

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Lol. Yes a GREEN roofs. It’s always good to read before posting.

In that case, here:

 

UtakataNoAnnex

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This kind of public spirited action is why few UTers have children!
On the bright side of life, they can at least sing soprano during choir practice after the fact... 😼
 

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