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The Toronto Tree Thread

At Credit Union Drive, just south of Eglinton Ave East:


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The simple difference a few meters makes.........

Two Pine Trees, planted the same year, in Queen's Park............ Photos taken May 28, 2022:

In the shade:

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In the sun:

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@Northern Light That photo is serendipitous. Do trees planted in shade remain stunted/small for good? Or, if exposed to the neccessary sunlight, say 10-15 years down the road, they will recover their missing growth?
 
@Northern Light That photo is serendipitous. Do trees planted in shade remain stunted/small for good? Or, if exposed to the neccessary sunlight, say 10-15 years down the road, they will recover their missing growth?

IF the tree remains sufficiently healthy while deprived of sun, yes, it can and likely will catch up if the canopy opens up above it.

You can see that in forests a lot actually where a large tree falls over, suddenly exposing smaller trees that were in its shade to more sun.

That said, full-sun species when fully shaded often die-off, as they have insufficient energy to maintain themselves.

Shade-tolerant species tend to just grow more slowly in the shade (Sugar Maple, Basswood etc.); and there are even those that really aren't super keen on full sun (Beech).

White Pine really prefers sun, strongly.

Most conifers are slower growers than most hardwoods.

Which is why you don't generally want to plant them directly side by side, unless the conifer has a considerable size advantage; because the hardwood will grow faster and spread its shade over the conifer stunting or killing it.

* exception for Eastern Hemlock which will tolerate some shade.
 
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Now, here's something we clearly need here!


Interesting idea; of course I don't know that it would 'transplant' well to Toronto (groan for intended pun here)

The notion there is obviously at least partially based on the idea of low-income property owners who require free service.

In Toronto where owning any plot of land makes you a de facto millionaire I suspect that may prove a harder sell.

Equally we do have lots and lots of arborists here, of varying capabilities.....; but in many cases here they would be unable to act so swiftly as tree removals or serious 'injuries' generally require permits.

Gobs of insurance requirements would also complicate matters.

That said, there's certainly some partial ideas that could be borrowed by both the public and the private sectors here.
 

Get a free tree, help grow the urban forest!​

The City is investing in tree planting and stewardship on private land to help enhance and expand our urban forest, and to improve the health of the environment. Toronto residents can now reserve free trees for planting on private property through the Community Canopy Program. An innovative online mapping tool helps residents plant the right tree in the right place to help maximize the air, water, energy and carbon benefits of their new tree. Toronto is the first Canadian city to offer this program in partnership with the Arbor Day Foundation. Visit Arbor Day Toronto to register. Trees available while supplies last.
 

Get a free tree, help grow the urban forest!​

The City is investing in tree planting and stewardship on private land to help enhance and expand our urban forest, and to improve the health of the environment. Toronto residents can now reserve free trees for planting on private property through the Community Canopy Program. An innovative online mapping tool helps residents plant the right tree in the right place to help maximize the air, water, energy and carbon benefits of their new tree. Toronto is the first Canadian city to offer this program in partnership with the Arbor Day Foundation. Visit Arbor Day Toronto to register. Trees available while supplies last.

Important to say, this is not for caliper size trees (6-10ft tall) which the City plants on its portion of your front yard on request.

This is for trees in 3 gallon pots, likely in the 3ft tall range.

Perfectly excellent trees, and a great resource if you want to naturalize a part of your property and use those as anchor plants.

But one shouldn't expect something taller in this program. (depending on species, you might get the odd 5-6ft 'whip' size......but not likely.)
 
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Great thread on Twitter today about some very successful street trees on Lower Sherbourne:
Yes, when the Lower Sherbourne Promenade Plan was implemented about a decade ago we insisted on proper tree trenches and the St Lawrence Market BIA are very attentive to watering and care. A few trees died a couple of years ago, the City finally replanted most of them this year.
 
I love the colors from the Red Maple! I did not know. Definitely planting one in my future front yard!

Just for clarity:

Red Maple: Acer rubrum

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source: https://rockwoodforest.com/products/acer-rubrum

Sugar Maple: Acer saccharum

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from: https://www.jardindion.com/produit/acer-saccharum/

Both beautiful trees, but Sugars are a bit 'warmer' in their tone.

Neither tree is particularly salt tolerant. They would do better setback from the road a bit.

Between the two, Sugar will do better in Toronto on average, I find Reds are just a bit fussier.
 

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