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Sunday St. Lawrence Antique Market. Anyone here go? Any tales of great "finds"?

adHominem

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seriously though, who would want this piece of junk?

I think you're missing the point of antique markets. It's all junk to someone, it's all treasure to someone.

(I'd love to have that, although it's wildly overpriced and I have nowhere to put it. I miss the Alpine Way.)
 

Mustapha

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I think you're missing the point of antique markets. It's all junk to someone, it's all treasure to someone.

(I'd love to have that, although it's wildly overpriced and I have nowhere to put it. I miss the Alpine Way.)

I still remember the hum of the machinery, the big wheel the wire ran around and the bump bump bump bump as it left the terminal for lack of a better word. :)
 

EVCco

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Last Sunday, for $8, I picked up a copy of Mississauga City Hall: A Canadian Competition, the 1984 Rizzoli publication with images of all the entries in the design competition, more detailed renderings and models of the leading designs, and some interesting short essays that put the winning design in the context of the times.

That is a great book!

Not to puncture your bubble too much, but if you go down to Mississauga City Hall they're giving them away for free!

Well, at least they were five or so years ago when I was there...

And I also had to lie and tell them I was a student...

And, come to think of it, if you live in Toronto, it probably costs over $8 in transit/gas just to get out there...

...nevermind. :rolleyes:
 

Urban Shocker

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A couple of weeks ago I bought a ( huge! ) vintage raccoon coat at the Market, for about half the price I paid for my Canada Goose parka last year. Took it to Magder on Spadina to get it cleaned, and it turned out very well. The coat, which "weighs a ton" and has a thick quilted lining and toggle buttons, was made by an American company in St. Paul that, as near as I can tell, went out of business in the early 1930s.
 

NIL OMNI

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Has anyone who frequents and purchases at the market changed their habits recently due to the bedbug epidemic in Toronto, considering that they can hide in book spines, clothing, picture frames and eggs can also be found in pieces of furniture if recently dropped off? The fear of bringing something home has put a real crimp in this pleasure for me...
 
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Mustapha

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Has anyone who frequents and purchases at the market changed their habits recently due to the bedbug epidemic in Toronto, considering that they can hide in book spines, clothing, picture frames and eggs can also be found in pieces of furniture if recently dropped off? The fear of bringing something home has put a real crimp in this pleasure for me...

Only speaking from my experience of buying old books, some of them decades old out-of-print editions; I've never had a bad experience.
 

sodapop

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there used to be this lady afew years back who sold vintage star wars figurines for about 10 bucks a piece, i'd get one every sunday when i went to visit my grandmother.
also, theres a samosa booth there on saturdays...there to die for! i suggest buying 6 or 7 cause once you start eating them you can't stop! :D
 

freshcutgrass

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Ah...the market.

It's been my Sunday routine for more years that I can remember. I always try to make it by 6:00 am, which is basically mandatory if you don't want to miss the collectable/valuable bargains (and they are always there). Too many dealers and collectors converge on the place, and much of the "good" stuff is long gone by the time the later crowd shows up. There's still some good stuff, but just the stuff priced beyond the dealers ability to re-sell at a mark-up (which I'm not, so that is my advantage).

I have gotten to know most of the people at the tables, and most of the regular dealers who haunt the place.

I could''t even begin to tell you how much "stuff" I've accumulated from the place over the years. Everything from a rock crystal skull...to a Ray Cattell painting...to a first edition "Toronto of Old". My latest fetish is Finnish glass...and the place has not disappointed.
 

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Last Sunday I bought the large and hefty three volume set of Charles Latham's In English Homes .

http://www.abaa.org/bibliozoom/image_viewer.php?imgURL=http://i.biblio.com/b/243x/280509243-0-x.jpg

Each volume was signed inside by local architect J.C.B Horwood. There had been other architectural books from his collection, the previous week, from the same seller - and some others that were new.

( The Toronto architectural firm of Burke, Horwood and White was founded in 1894 by Edmund Burke (b at Toronto 31 Oct 1850; d at Toronto 2 Jan 1919) and J.C.B. Horwood (b at Quidi Vidi, Newfoundland 19 Mar 1864; d at Toronto 1938). Burke had been a partner in the firm Langley and Burke from 1873 to1892, and practiced on his own in 1892-94. Horwood apprenticed with Langley and Burke before working in New York for several years. Murray White (b at Woodstock 5 Aug 1869; d at Toronto 3 Nov 1935), who also apprenticed with Langley and Burke, worked in Chicago from 1892 to1907, and did not join Burke and Horwood until 1909.

Canadian ArchitectureBurke and Horwood's first important commission was the rebuilding of the Robert Simpson store in Toronto. Burke had executed the original store in 1894, but it burnt down within weeks of opening. Horwood had gained experience with the most advanced building methods in New York, and Simpson hired the new partnership to design a new fire-proofed store in 1895-96. The store's façade presented the grid-like pattern of the Chicago style, with only limited ornamentation on the ground floor and cornice. The original store and its replacement were likely the first Canadian application of curtain wall construction.

Burke, Horwood and White were one of the most successful Canadian architectural firms during the boom decades preceding World War I. The firm was commissioned to design many churches across the country; other important institutional clients included the YMCA and Mt Allison University in New Brunswick. The firm also produced many substantial homes for wealthy clients in Ontario and the Maritimes.

Burke, Horwood and White were known for their commercial buildings, and this led to the firm's appointment as architects to the Hudson's Bay Company. Large, classical department stores were built in Calgary, Vancouver and Victoria, 1912-26. Burke also consulted on civic planning for Toronto, such as the architectural aspects of the Bloor Street viaduct.

Though the firm designed buildings in various historical styles, its projects also utilized modern materials and methods of construction, such as glazed terra cotta, early iron and reinforced concrete frames, and forms of fire protection. During this period buildings became increasingly large and complex, and their design required more specialized knowledge. Burke always researched advances in technology, building programming, and design, and shared his knowledge with colleagues in the form of lectures and publications. In the words of his biographer, Burke "presided over the transformation of the architect from craftsman to consulting professional."

Indeed, both Burke and Horwood were active among professional architectural societies. In particular, Burke served as president of the Ontario Association of Architects four times, and was the founding vice-president of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

The firm was renamed Horwood and White in 1919 after Burke's death, and existed under that name until 1969. After the deaths of the latter two partners the firm was run by Horwood's son, Eric C. Horwood (1900-84). In 1979, Eric Horwood donated to the Archives of Ontario over a century's worth of architectural drawings done by Burke, Horwood and White, and by many of their predecessor firms such as Langley and Burke
. )
 

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A pair of simple, rectangular Georg Jensen sterling cufflinks, slightly concave with subtly beveled edges ( marked '84' and designed in the early 1960s by Flemming Eskildsen I believe ) for $45.
 

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A hand-thrown studio bowl signed by Molly Satterly, 1938, about 13 inches across by five inches deep. Satterly was an early member of Ontario's ceramic studio pottery community, so I'm delighted to have found it. Looks like tin-glazed earthenware. In addition to images of plants and animals in a circular motif within, and a deco-like design of curved mountains on the outside, there are two quotes from Sir Thomas Browne's Religio Medici running round the bowl in handsome calligraphy:

On the inside: I take my circle to be above three hundred and sixty

On the outside: There is surely a piece of divinity in us: something that was before the elements, & owes no homage unto the sun
 

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