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Roads: Ontario/GTA Highways Discussion

The QEW is really the only 400 series that doesn't predominantly travel in one cardinal direction (Edit: there's the 115 on a diagonal but it still travels in one straight line). If the 413 is built, it will be interesting to see which direction it is signed. Maybe it will be done like Calgary's 201, where each section has its own directions. Or possibly it will be signed as 400 VIA 413 and 401 VIA 413, with no cardinal directions. My guess is the control cities (based on what the 407E's are) would probably be Barrie (although that would be far off) and Mississauga/Brampton? After all Peterborough is signed on the 412N, and Toronto on 407E.
The Bradford Bypass would almost definitely be signed one way as Barrie and the other way as Toronto/Newmarket.
413 would be east/west. Just like 407 right at the 413's western terminal. Both the 403 and 407 are signed east/west while going north/south at that Peel/Halton boarder area. In fact while being signed east, it's true direction is NNW.

Perhaps the government should subsidies trucks on the 407 between the 403 and 401 to create a toll-free corridor from the QEW via the 403 and 401 to connect to the 413.
 
Random, I think it fits here topic after I feel into a rabbit hole... Is there any reason diamond grinding isn't used on the 400 series? Everywhere I've seen, it's been nice, quiet, and smooth. I've only seen it in a few places across the 407,and even there it isn't consistent. The newest extensions of the 407 are back to regular ashfault surfaces.

I've seen it used on the 95 through upstate by, so I'm not sure weather is a reason not to install. Supposedly cheaper... Is it because we have too high volumes?
 
The QEW is really the only 400 series that doesn't predominantly travel in one cardinal direction (Edit: there's the 115 on a diagonal but it still travels in one straight line). If the 413 is built, it will be interesting to see which direction it is signed. Maybe it will be done like Calgary's 201, where each section has its own directions. Or possibly it will be signed as 400 VIA 413 and 401 VIA 413, with no cardinal directions. My guess is the control cities (based on what the 407E's are) would probably be Barrie (although that would be far off) and Mississauga/Brampton? After all Peterborough is signed on the 412N, and Toronto on 407E.
The Bradford Bypass would almost definitely be signed one way as Barrie and the other way as Toronto/Newmarket.

I find it stupid the way the 400 control cities are signed Parry Sound-Barrie as far north as Port Severn and then Toronto-Sudbury north of there. I'd think that would cause confusion driving north seeing Sudbury before reaching Parry Sound, especially since most people are only going as far as Parry Sound.
 
That's... unusual. I think the only places where this is true is within major cities like Toronto and Ottawa. (and only the ETR). Everywhere else you have destination labels. I assume this is because in these areas the highways are mostly used for Intracity purposes, and as such the final destination isn't that useful.

But if you go out into the suburbs like Richmond Hill or Vaughan, they display the final destination just fine:
View attachment 400713

But if you go out into the suburbs like Richmond Hill or Vaughan, they display the final destination just fine:
View attachment 400713

The MTO signs them in the 905 suburbs because they're not Toronto and the MTO treats them as such, even though the conditions are the same.
 
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I would like to see this in Ontario, especially in rural and northern areas:


Some drawbacks:

“Since the road markings were put in place two weeks ago it has been reported that some drivers were driving along the road in the dark with their headlights switched off so that they could experience the glow in the dark effect,” the BBC reports.

Drivers also soon found out, an unfortunate observation confirmed by civil engineers in charge, that “road markings were sensitive to large amounts of moisture due to rainfall.”

Reflectors embedded in the road would probably work better.
 
I would like to see this in Ontario, especially in rural and northern areas:


Some drawbacks:

“Since the road markings were put in place two weeks ago it has been reported that some drivers were driving along the road in the dark with their headlights switched off so that they could experience the glow in the dark effect,” the BBC reports.

Drivers also soon found out, an unfortunate observation confirmed by civil engineers in charge, that “road markings were sensitive to large amounts of moisture due to rainfall.”

Reflectors embedded in the road would probably work better.
Worth noting that the drawbacks reported were from a prior pilot run in the Netherlands in 2014. Hopefully Australian drivers are smart enough to not switch off their headlights, and that whatever formula they are using is more resilient to the weather. That part of Australia is of a similar climate to coastal BC so if successful, it would definitely have applicability in Canada.
 
I would like to see this in Ontario, especially in rural and northern areas:


Some drawbacks:

“Since the road markings were put in place two weeks ago it has been reported that some drivers were driving along the road in the dark with their headlights switched off so that they could experience the glow in the dark effect,” the BBC reports.

Drivers also soon found out, an unfortunate observation confirmed by civil engineers in charge, that “road markings were sensitive to large amounts of moisture due to rainfall.”

Reflectors embedded in the road would probably work better.
The problem with reflectors embedded in the road is snow plows. They use them in some of the southern states.
 
They are quite common in California, but in cold climates need “cuts” in the asphalt so that they are below the plow line. Those cuts make them a lot more expensive to install to be impractical, and even those aren’t foolproof at keeping the plows off them.

Some snow states have them by doing that, but they are rare in areas that have snow in general. Places like California and Nevada have them friggen everywhere.
 
They are quite common in California, but in cold climates need “cuts” in the asphalt so that they are below the plow line. Those cuts make them a lot more expensive to install to be impractical, and even those aren’t foolproof at keeping the plows off them.

Some snow states have them by doing that, but they are rare in areas that have snow in general. Places like California and Nevada have them friggen everywhere.

You might be thinking of Botts dots, which either augment or even replace paint in a lot of CA, AZ, and NV. They’re great in many ways - more reflective and are felt when driving over them - but not compatible with snow clearance.
 
I would like to see this in Ontario, especially in rural and northern areas:


Some drawbacks:

“Since the road markings were put in place two weeks ago it has been reported that some drivers were driving along the road in the dark with their headlights switched off so that they could experience the glow in the dark effect,” the BBC reports.

Drivers also soon found out, an unfortunate observation confirmed by civil engineers in charge, that “road markings were sensitive to large amounts of moisture due to rainfall.”

Reflectors embedded in the road would probably work better.
Honestly I don't see the point. Yellow paint is generally quite reflective and I don't think anyone has ever had a problem with not being able to see road lines at night. The exception to this is probably during winter time, however as others have pointed out, these lights aren't exactly usable when snowed in either - so its not like that problem is solved.
 
I don't know when this was last updated (I didn't notice it before), but the Ontario Southern Highways Program list shows that 2024-2025 is planned to be the start of construction of the new Highway 7 Grand River Bridges. The actual highway itself doesn't have a date yet, but I can't imagine it would be too long afterward.
 
I don't know when this was last updated (I didn't notice it before), but the Ontario Southern Highways Program list shows that 2024-2025 is planned to be the start of construction of the new Highway 7 Grand River Bridges. The actual highway itself doesn't have a date yet, but I can't imagine it would be too long afterward.
One would think - on the other hand many thought it would get going after they build the interchange and ramps to it, in Kitchener in the 1960s - including the extra-wide section of the Conestoga Expressway to handle the traffic flowing off it.
 
I don't know when this was last updated (I didn't notice it before), but the Ontario Southern Highways Program list shows that 2024-2025 is planned to be the start of construction of the new Highway 7 Grand River Bridges. The actual highway itself doesn't have a date yet, but I can't imagine it would be too long afterward.

Geesh the Highway 7 freeway from K-W to Guelph just seems to get delayed further and further. Douggie now has more political pressure to build the 413 now so I would assume this highway will once again be on the backburner. Doesn't help when Kitchener Centre, Waterloo and Guelph ridings didn't elect any PC MPPs. These ridings may be ignored more by the new PC government.
 

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