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Roads: Ontario/GTA Highways Discussion

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ya, thats how life works
 
I get the cartoon poking fun at the idea that adding another lane would be a solution to congestion, but what the heck is the anti-french sentiment about? That seems racist.
 
Does anyone know why the highway signage standards in Ontario are relatively poor? This is a bit of a pet peeve of mine and apologies if it's been discussed already.

For example, highway signs will often not refer to destinations. They might say "401 West" without making reference to London, Windsor etc.
Another example is the use of exit numbers, which are sometimes non-existant even on 400-series highways.

Don't get me started on highways like the DVP...
 
Does anyone know why the highway signage standards in Ontario are relatively poor? This is a bit of a pet peeve of mine and apologies if it's been discussed already.

For example, highway signs will often not refer to destinations. They might say "401 West" without making reference to London, Windsor etc.
Another example is the use of exit numbers, which are sometimes non-existant even on 400-series highways.
That's... unusual. I think the only places where this is true is within major cities like Toronto and Ottawa. (and only the ETR). Everywhere else you have destination labels. I assume this is because in these areas the highways are mostly used for Intracity purposes, and as such the final destination isn't that useful.

But if you go out into the suburbs like Richmond Hill or Vaughan, they display the final destination just fine:
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Don't get me started on highways like the DVP...
DVP is run by the City of Toronto, so the signage rules and theirs and theirs alone.
 
Does anyone know why the highway signage standards in Ontario are relatively poor? This is a bit of a pet peeve of mine and apologies if it's been discussed already.

For example, highway signs will often not refer to destinations. They might say "401 West" without making reference to London, Windsor etc.
Another example is the use of exit numbers, which are sometimes non-existant even on 400-series highways.

Don't get me started on highways like the DVP...
exactly. At 401/402 junction no mention of Port Huron or Detroit
On Highway 401 & 427 area there is only an airplane logo in some of the signs, no "Pearson Airport"
 
That's... unusual. I think the only places where this is true is within major cities like Toronto and Ottawa. (and only the ETR). Everywhere else you have destination labels. I assume this is because in these areas the highways are mostly used for Intracity purposes, and as such the final destination isn't that useful.
I was amused to see a sign in Montreal that said 'Toronto' with an arrow. I imagine a poor tourist thinking you could just pop over to Toronto. My European family often has this misconception that you can day trip to Ottawa or Montreal.
 
exactly. At 401/402 junction no mention of Port Huron or Detroit
On Highway 401 & 427 area there is only an airplane logo in some of the signs, no "Pearson Airport"
Why would the 401/402 junction need to reference Port Huron or Detroit from that distance? Sarnia and Windsor are both significant enough geographically as control cities.
 
Why would the 401/402 junction need to reference Port Huron or Detroit from that distance? Sarnia and Windsor are both significant enough geographically as control cities.

We're talking control cities. On Highway 401, there are 6 of them: Windsor, London, Toronto, Kingston, Cornwall, and Montreal. All except Cornwall are good control cities: major destinations of their own right. But control cities are decided by the province or state, and MTO seems to like more control cities than less. In Detroit, I-94 is signed with Chicago as the control city, though Ann Arbor and Kalamazoo (both medium size cities with major universities) are both in between. Pennsylvania's control cities are often quite obscure places, especially on I-80, which cuts across the northern part of the state with few major population centres.

In Quebec, they are very good at signing the highway connection and like long-distance control cities - so where 20, 30, and 40 meet just west of Montreal Island, you'll see the 401 and 417 shields with 20 and 40 respectively. South of Montreal, you'll see I-87 accompany A-15, and I-89 accompany A-35 (with the states - New York and Vermont - themselves being the control cities).
 
exactly. At 401/402 junction no mention of Port Huron or Detroit
On Highway 401 & 427 area there is only an airplane logo in some of the signs, no "Pearson Airport"
I'm guessing the standard from that distance out is to sign for the Canadian control or terminal city. Otherwise, how far do you push it? Hwy 401 is also the route that takes you to Florida.

I don't think any MTO freeway signage has the airport's name on it. I suppose they assume you are enroute to a known airport destination and this is the exit. If you are looking for the airport on the Island or at Hamilton, you'll know soon enough that you are lost. Besides, "Pearson Airport" isn't the proper name and is no more descriptive.
 

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