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Metrolinx: Presto Fare Card

Tuscani01

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I was just in Auckland, where their fare card system reminded me of Presto. 24 hours before your balance is loaded, and a $10 cost for the card itself vs. $6 for Presto. Unlike Presto though, finding somewhere to reload your card is much more difficult if you need to top it up immediately, and no going into negatives when you need that one ride. Also took noticeably longer for a tap to register on a fare reader, meaning slow boarding/de-boarding of buses.

It even initially had a 25 cent fee for topping up your card. Similar situation as Presto, where Auckland Transit partnered with Thales to develop their own system. No plans to incorporate open payment on their system like Presto is currently working towards though.

I guess we can be happy we don't have the worst system out there?
 
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rbt

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I was just in Auckland, where their fare card system reminded me of Presto. 24 hours before your balance is loaded, and a $10 cost for the card itself vs. $6 for Presto. Unlike Presto though, finding somewhere to reload your card is much more difficult if you need to top it up immediately, and no going into negatives when you need that one ride. Also took noticeably longer for a tap to register on a fare reader, meaning slow boarding/de-boarding of buses.

It even initially had a 25 cent fee for topping up your card. Similar situation as Presto, where Auckland Transit partnered with Thales to develop their own system. No plans to incorporate open payment on their system like Presto is currently working towards though.

I guess we can be happy we don't have the worst system out there?
Auckland bought a $87M NZD card. I'm not sure the GTA received over 5x the value of what Auckland has received (another 5x is due to much larger coverage).

I would have preferred the Auckland card + East Bayfront LRT (~2010 tender) instead.

Presto V3 (the open-payment machines) ought to be perfectly fine but there was no need to either create it from scratch or learn several expensive lessons along the way due to selecting a vendor with minimal experience in that area. That said, it's a sunk cost now.

Hopefully the MTO Presto people (now Metrolinx) won't get into medicine; I prefer buying off-the-shelf MRI machines instead of trying to roll our own over 15 years at 5x the price.
 
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Tuscani01

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Auckland bought a $87M NZD card. I'm not sure the GTA received over 5x the value of what Auckland has received (another 5x is due to much larger coverage).

I would have preferred the Auckland card + East Bayfront LRT (~2010 tender) instead.

Presto V3 (the open-payment machines) ought to be perfectly fine but there was no need to either create it from scratch or learn several expensive lessons along the way due to selecting a vendor with minimal experience in that area. That said, it's a sunk cost now.

Hopefully the MTO Presto people (now Metrolinx) won't get into medicine; I prefer buying off-the-shelf MRI machines instead of trying to roll our own over 15 years at 5x the price.
I mean, sure, but the Metrolinx does have 5x more municipalities using the card, and a much larger userbase than AT HOP. AT HOP also took 7 years of development to get to where it is today and wasn't an off the shelf solution for them either.
 

rbt

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I mean, sure, but the Metrolinx does have 5x more municipalities using the card, and a much larger userbase than AT HOP.
I actually accounted for that, which is why it's 5x and not 12x. Presto's total bill is over $1B between provincial subsidies, capital/deployment payments made by transit organizations, and TTC startup costs.

AT HOP ... wasn't an off the shelf solution for them either.
Didn't know that. I guess "Not Invented Here" syndrome isn't exclusive to Ontario.
 

MetroMan

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Does anyone know how to add their Presto card to Apple Pay/Wallet?
You can't but Metrolinx is working with Apple on it now. Given how slowly things move at Metrolinx, I wouldn't even try to guess when it'll be ready but Apple worked with other transit agencies and got it up and running very quickly in those cases.
 

Bureaucromancer

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I rather suspect a lot of nonsense is going on between Metrolinx and whatever contractor on the scope of work for a lot of technically simple projects that weren't included originally and which Accenture and associates now want to charge through the nose to implement.
 

EastYorkTTCFan

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GTA readers show balance as well. It's the TTC and only the TTC that has decided the AODA means something unreasonable and different from anyone elses reading.
The other cities haven't been sued by lawyers representing the blind as they don't have the headquarters for the CNIB in them is the most likey reason why the TTC wants to interpret the rules as they do.
 

littlewill1166

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The other cities haven't been sued by lawyers representing the blind as they don't have the headquarters for the CNIB in them is the most likey reason why the TTC wants to interpret the rules as they do.
I guess if the TTC does get sued, they could use that as an excuse to cut the CNIB pass program and save millions of dollars each year.
 

Richard White

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The other cities haven't been sued by lawyers representing the blind as they don't have the headquarters for the CNIB in them is the most likey reason why the TTC wants to interpret the rules as they do.
It is a North American problem as a whole. People will sue for everything, complain about everything just to get a few bucks.

There was a woman who recently complained that her civil liberties were encroached upon because she wss subjected to a search at Walmart. Apparently she felt the need to file a complaint against Walmart for ensuring that nobody was stealing. Apparently they "demanded" to check her bags to ensure she was not shoplifting.

See here: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.5355527

The point I am trying to make is that in Toronto the population is larger than any other city in Canada with a more "diverse" population. People will complain that water is too wet if it meant they could make a few bucks.

My father recently retired as a bus driver with the ttc and mentions frequently how you can no longer get away with things that were fine 30 years ago. Now if you say something like "can I see a student ID" people will report the operator for doing his job and claim they are being racist for not asking to see anyone else's ID. As a result operators take a blind eye to fare evasion. It is easier than running the risk of a human rights complaint.

The TTC knows this and they have to think of everything from a legal perspective
 

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