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GO Transit: Service thread (including extensions)

Here is a rendering of Confederation GO from MTO. Love the black.

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Did I hear correctly in the Q and A that this station will open in 2025? I assume that means the third track between Confederation and West Harbour will be done by then? @SaugeenJunction
 

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If we don't want every station to be mistaken for the Taj Majal this station design is an excellent place to start.

If we don't want every station mistaken for an oversized underground parking entrance, this station design would be a good place to stop.
Never mind underground parking, it looks like a nuclear shelter!
 
If we don't want every station to be mistaken for the Taj Majal this station design is an excellent place to start.

If we don't want every station mistaken for an oversized underground parking entrance, this station design would be a good place to stop.
yes - the station building is fine to me but damn asphalt paving for the pedestrian areas outside is a waste. At least do concrete!

The station isn't expected to be super high ridership so it doesn't need to be the taj mahal. The size of the station building looks fine.
 
yes - the station building is fine to me but damn asphalt paving for the pedestrian areas outside is a waste. At least do concrete!

The station isn't expected to be super high ridership so it doesn't need to be the taj mahal. The size of the station building looks fine.
That’s definitely just an issue with the render, I doubt it’ll be asphalt. Does GO even use asphalt for platforms or pedestrian areas anymore?
 
yes - the station building is fine to me

We'll have to disagree. It has a lack of basis design sense to me. This isn't about throwing $$$ as it; its how you spend the $$$.

Rule 1) The principle entrance to a building should be obvious.

In the render, it is not. There's the vague idea of a doorway on the one side and the station name on the opposite side of the building. Nope.

The station name should be aligned to an entrance area; the doors should be decently wide, and there should probably be a bump in ceiling height or roof line around the entrance, some visual cue, even changes in paving treatment or non-structural columns next to the door.

Rule 2) The design should be informative

(this way to trains, ticket machines this way etc.) that doesn't all need to be spelled out on exterior signage, much can be intuitive, but give me something.

Rule 3) The design should be welcoming.

Make me feel like I matter as a customer/rider. This is about seating, warm materials, attractive lighting, weather protection.

Rule 4) The design should compliment the brand. In this case, that means GO Transit, and public transit more broadly. That's not just a 'GO' logo. Its about the building reading visually as a station building of some kind. That need not be pastiche, just recognizable for its purpose.

Rule 5) A commuter train station should be a community hub/landmark in some fashion. That may sound grandiose, but I don't mean it that way. A modest station building in size, proportion and material budget can still have a nice public seating area, can still have a small clock-tower feature, exterior drinking fountains or the like.

The size of the station building looks fine.

Agreed, more or less. I don't see any reason it needs a second storey or more ft2; but as part of good design, it should looks less like blase box, which might involve adding some modest height by the entrance.
 
That’s definitely just an issue with the render, I doubt it’ll be asphalt. Does GO even use asphalt for platforms or pedestrian areas anymore?
They use asphalt almost exclusively on platforms due to platform heaters. I haven’t seen it used on circulation areas like this before though.
 
It's basically a modern version of an Amshack. Simple, modular design (with the Metrolinx black) that includes a waiting area, service counter, and washrooms. Other new or renovated stations feature this design, at different scales, like Rutherford and Bramalea. Some of these buildings include stairs and elevator to an underpass, some have doors leading to train or bus platforms, some have a kiosk space attached, some are attached to a parking garage.

But they're all the same basic design now: squat and black, with roof overhangs and big glass windows. The 1990s and early 2000s favoured a pomo design (Mount Pleasant, King City, Mount Joy, the old Rutherford Station) with minor differences in size and amenities.
 
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