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GO Transit Fleet Equipment and other

If I was GO, I'd want to keep the flat-nosed cabs on predominantly passenger-only routes as much as possible as they do not have CEM. This logic doesn't apply if they're running on the Milton Line however.
Though with the amount of freight traffic the Galt sees these days I would certainly be inclined to think it's a passenger only route
 
It isn't that busy with CP anymore? I guess that's good news for future Milton Line service?
Ever since the KCS merger came into the news you dont see as many trains on the Galt between Guelph Junction and west toronto... mactier is still pretty busy
 
Though with the amount of freight traffic the Galt sees these days I would certainly be inclined to think it's a passenger only route

Well, yes and no. The number of trains per day is definitely lower, yes. And due to the dimensions of the Detroit tunnel, a certain amount of traffic that used to run through Windsor now detours through Buffalo so that it can be handled as a double stack container train(s).

But in terms of tonnage, it's still very busy.... just fewer trains that are much longer. And run to more demanding schedules that could be messed up if there were too many passenger trains in the way. With different yarding and switching needs and locations.

The challenge for running these longer trains is how to keep them moving so they don't block crossings, or have awkward meets with other trains given that both may be over siding length. In Halton and Peel especially, what used to be possible in having trains stop and cross over to pass each other and weave around GO trains is much more difficult.

So a route that looked like an easy path for GO when it was overhauled back in the 1980's is not necessarily just as easy a path today, even though fewer trains a day pass over it.

- Paul
 
Well, yes and no. The number of trains per day is definitely lower, yes. And due to the dimensions of the Detroit tunnel, a certain amount of traffic that used to run through Windsor now detours through Buffalo so that it can be handled as a double stack container train(s).

But in terms of tonnage, it's still very busy.... just fewer trains that are much longer. And run to more demanding schedules that could be messed up if there were too many passenger trains in the way. With different yarding and switching needs and locations.

The challenge for running these longer trains is how to keep them moving so they don't block crossings, or have awkward meets with other trains given that both may be over siding length. In Halton and Peel especially, what used to be possible in having trains stop and cross over to pass each other and weave around GO trains is much more difficult.

So a route that looked like an easy path for GO when it was overhauled back in the 1980's is not necessarily just as easy a path today, even though fewer trains a day pass over it.

- Paul
The number of trains has declined over the years as they get longer. The longest I have seen on the line in the past year was 177 cars of mixed traffic including double deck containers. Years or even decades ago, you were lucky to see 100 cars trains.

Most of those long trains move at night, but still see a few during the day.

On demand scheduled plays a large part finding space for any type of other trains including GO on any systems in NA. At the same time is having sidings that can handle the longest trains is a big issues. Have heard of an few Opps where 2 trains couldn't pass each other to the point it took some tight moving to get around each other very slowly.

The sooner they start filling in the missing gaps for the 3rd track on the Milton line, better off it will be for everyone until there are 4 tracks in the corridor.
 
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