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GO Transit Fleet Equipment and other

Can someone start a GoFundMe campaign and buy him that horn or the entire car?
Just block him or report him. As long as ppl responded to his posting, the more he will post
 
Picture of 212 at Willowbrook (image not mine)
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While the 2nd horn is much more bearable, it does show how over/underpasses are needed on the system.

While some may think it's a bit of a waste of money, I certainly don't. Besides being both faster and safer, they also result in a quiet neighbourhood.. It's one thing to have to tolerate a train horn every hour and quite another having to tolerate it every 8 minutes at a MINIMUM all day long late into the evening even on Sundays. This is when local communities start to view GO service in a negative light as the noise levels become intolerable. I think the entire RER sections of GO should be 100% grade separated.
Why does only VIA have emergency horns and GO doesn't?
 
GO does have emergency horns
Well not in the way VIA does

VIA has two seperate horns, one for normal and the other for emergency.

GO has one single horn designed to be both a normal horn at low blast and emergency at full.

However I think anymore horn related discussions will lead to issues so I feel as though we should leave it at that.
 
However I think anymore horn related discussions will lead to issues so I feel as though we should leave it at that.

Actually, I will poke the bear just a little for context.

Horns on railway trains are closely regulated by Transport Canada here and by the FRA in the US. The standards that exist today in the two countries are very similar, and they both derive from the same very well researched technical base.

The modifications that led to the newest versions of the standards were driven by concerns that particularly at high speeds, the traditional horns might not be heard well enough, or even recognized as a train horn (as opposed to, say a truck on a nearby highway) and the resulting reaction by motorists or trespassers might be too little, too late. As passenger train speeds have risen on some lines, reaction times have been shortened so safety margins needed adjustment..

All horns in use by major passenger railroads, such as VIA and GO, comply with these more exacting standards. The technical details generally relate to the number of discrete bells, their mounting location, their tuning, and the control valves used. There are many models available on the market. They all work to the same standard. VIA in particular has updated their horns iteratively from an as-delivered state, which means the horn configuration on their older locos today is not necessarily what they would buy next time.

This particular poster has expressed a personal subjective preference for one particular model of horn. They are welcome to their choice. But the selections made by railroads deal with cost, maintainability, reliability, life cycle, etc. So one person’s preference is not a business decision. Hopefully GO is making business decisions first.

As someone who does his share of hornblowing at much slower speeds with preserved equipment, I can tell you that the ability to quill a traditional three-tone horn with an old control valve produces a lovely result. We all have our aesthetic preferences.

GO’s priority is simply to a) be safe and b) meet the regulatory standard.

- Paul
 
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Well not in the way VIA does

VIA has two seperate horns, one for normal and the other for emergency.

GO has one single horn designed to be both a normal horn at low blast and emergency at full.

However I think anymore horn related discussions will lead to issues so I feel as though we should leave it at that.
From an operator and pneumatic standpoint, they are identical. There are two buttons, one for "regular" and one for "emergency", with the only difference between them being the air pressure in the circuit. Higher air pressure directly correlates to a louder horn.

VIA and AMT have chosen to apply two sets of horns to their locomotives and control units.

GO (and apparently WCE) instead use a split manifold. Air from the "regular" circuit goes into one half of the manifold and goes into 2 trumpets of the 5-trumpet horn, while the air from the "emergency" circuit goes into the other half of the manifold and goes into the other 3 trumpets.

This ruling applies to only passenger trains travelling over 65mph, and came about from various noise complaints over the years - before the regulations had a fairly broad range (~85 to 115dB, IIRC) that the horn could operate in. Since then, horns have to be inspected and tested pretty frequently, and the noise generated by them is generally fairly consistent - which the neighbourhoods around the tracks appreciate.


Dan
 
You know, I wonder how does GO handle yard switching? I see that often times they just take an F59 or rarely an MP54 and use it as a yard switcher but is there any sort of planning in place to determine what will be a yard switcher and for how long?
 

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