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Who would you like to see win the 2016 US election?

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tiffer24

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Day 21

Jackson Proskow@JProskowGlobal
3 hours ago
President-elect threatens to revoke citizenship from those who exercise constitutionally protected right to free speech.


Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump
Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag - if they do, there must be consequences - perhaps loss of citizenship or year in jail!
 

Euphoria

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It's more over the top rhetoric, hopefully nothing more than that, but I can see how Trump has a wedge here. People are tired of acting as though no native traditions are sacred. It's a backlash against the pol cor position that the new and exceptional always takes precedence over the status quo. This is what the reasonable accommodation debate in Quebec was about. People can call the backlash jingoist, racist, sexist, and so forth, but if the accommodations seem ridiculous to most people, the pol cor crowd will stamp their feet on campuses and simply be ignored. It happened with Brexit and now with Trump. It's a worrisome culture war at the extremes.
 

W. K. Lis

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Pro-Trump site Breitbart News calls for Kellogg’s boycott over decision to pull ad

Breitbart is fighting back at one of the advertisers — the breakfast cereal maker Kellogg Co. — by launching a Twitter campaign #DumpKelloggs.

See link.

The Breitbart News Network is seeing some of its advertisers head for the exit doors and is responding in typical Breitbart fashion: by going on the counteroffensive, labelling one of them as “un-American” and calling it a war on conservatism.

Since Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election, Los Angeles-based Breitbart has experienced a backlash from some advertisers who say that the online site conflicts with their corporate values.

Breitbart took a pro-Trump stance during the campaign, supporting the Republican candidate’s views on immigration and national security. The company’s executive chairman, Steve Bannon, who is on a leave of absence, was Trump’s campaign manager and has been named chief White House strategist.

Although Bannon was quoted in Mother Jones as saying Breitbart is a platform for the “alt-right” — the ultraconservative movement associated with white nationalism — the news site has denied accusations that it engages in racist rhetoric. The company has stated that it isn’t affiliated with the alt-right and that the brand of nationalism it espouses is political, not racial.

Breitbart is fighting back at one of the advertisers — the breakfast cereal maker Kellogg Co. — by launching a Twitter campaign #DumpKelloggs that encourages its readers to sign a petition and boycott the maker of such favourites as Froot Loops and Apple Jacks.

On Wednesday, Breitbart placed an article about its #DumpKelloggs campaign in the top slot of its homepage. By early afternoon, the article had drawn more than 6,000 reader comments, many in support of the boycott.

“Kellogg’s decision to blacklist one of the largest conservative media outlets in America is economic censorship of mainstream conservative political discourse. That is as un-American as it gets,” Breitbart said in a statement.

The site said it has a community of 45 million loyal readers “who are also a powerful consumer group that reflects the values of mainstreet America.” In October, the site drew 19.2 million unique visitors, up nearly 50 per cent from 12.9 million visitors in the same month last year, according to data from ComScore.

The Kellogg Co. said in a statement that it regularly works with media buying partners to “ensure our ads do not appear on sites that aren’t aligned with our values as set forth in our advertising guidelines.”

Kellogg’s guidelines state that it won’t place ads in media that “encourages offensive behaviour to others, or where the media is not consistent with our product or corporate image.”

The cereal company said that it advertises on a large number of websites, “so occasionally something is inadvertently missed. In this case, we learned from consumers that ads were placed on Breitbart.com and decided to discontinue advertising there.”

It is common for companies to buy online ads through third-party networks or ad exchanges that place the ads on numerous sites. As a result, many companies may not be aware of which sites on which their ads ultimately appear.

Other companies that have pulled their ads from Breitbart in recent weeks include the insurance giant Allstate and the ad exchange AppNexus.

“We determined that the site violates our hate speech prohibition,” said Josh Zeitz, a spokesman for AppNexus. He said that Breitbart was never a direct client, but that some of AppNexus’ technology partners made Breitbart’s inventory available on its exchange.

A spokeswoman for Allstate declined to comment.

It remains unclear how much the loss in ad revenue will hurt Breitbart. The media company is privately held and doesn’t discuss its business operations. But Chief Executive Larry Solov recently told the Los Angeles Times that the company relies on advertising for the majority its revenue and that it uses multiple ad networks.

The company said Wednesday that Kellogg’s decision “will make virtually no revenue impact.” It said the move by Kellogg and other companies represents an escalation in the war “against conservative customers whose values propelled Donald Trump into the White House.”

Breitbart is rumoured to receive significant backing from the hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer, who has been a key supporter of Trump. The site was founded a decade ago by journalist Andrew Breitbart, who died in 2012, and has an editorial staff of about 100 worldwide.

The site has seen a surge in popularity in the months leading up to the election and is planning to expand its footprint into France and Germany to capitalize on the nationalist movements gaining steam in Europe as a result of the continent’s refugee crisis.

On Wednesday, some of Breitbart’s top brass took to social media to take aim at the advertising defectors, describing Kellogg as “bigotry for breakfast.”

“Far, far, far more bigotry comes from the left than the right,” said Alex Marlow, Breitbart’s editor in chief, on Twitter.
:D
 

Videodrome

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W. K. Lis

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From The Star, at this link:

‘I just wish that I had not voted.’ Trump voter lost her home to his new Treasury secretary

Teena Colebrook’s home was foreclosed on by the bank of Donald Trump’s pick for Treasury. “They all promise you the world at the end of a stick and take it away once they get in,” she said.

When Donald Trump named his Treasury secretary, Teena Colebrook felt her heart sink.

She had voted for the president-elect on the belief that he would knock the moneyed elites from their perch in Washington, D.C. And she knew Trump’s pick for Treasury — Steven Mnuchin — all too well.

OneWest, a bank formerly owned by a group of investors headed by Mnuchin, had foreclosed on her Los Angeles-area home in the aftermath of the Great Recession, stripping her of the two units she rented as a primary source of income.

“I just wish that I had not voted,” said Colebrook, 59. “I have no faith in our government anymore at all. They all promise you the world at the end of a stick and take it away once they get in.”

Less than a month after his presidential win, Trump’s populist appeal has started to clash with a Cabinet of billionaires and millionaires that he believes can energize economic growth.

The prospect of Mnuchin leading the Treasury Department drew plaudits from many in the financial sector. A former Goldman Sachs executive who pivoted in the early 2000s to hedge fund management and movie production, he seemed an ideal emissary to Wall Street.

When asked on Wednesday about his credentials to be Treasury secretary, Mnuchin emphasized his time running OneWest — which not only foreclosed on Colebrook but also on thousands of others in the aftermath of the housing crisis caused by subprime mortgages.

“What I’ve really been focused on is being a regional banker for the last eight years,” Mnuchin said. “I know what it takes to make sure that we can make loans to small and midmarket companies and that’s going to be our big focus, making sure we scale back regulation so that we make sure the banks are lending.”

But the prospect of Mnuchin leading the Treasury Department prompted Colebrook and other OneWest borrowers who say they unfairly faced foreclosure to contact The Associated Press. Colebrook wishes she could meet with Trump to explain why she feels betrayed by his Cabinet selection after believing that his presidency could restore the balance of power to everyday people.

“He doesn’t want the truth,” she said. “He’s now backing his buddies.”

The Trump transition team has been sensitive to preserving trust with its voters. Senior adviser Kellyanne Conway publicly warned that supporters would feel “betrayed” if former critic Mitt Romney was named secretary of state, for instance.

For Mnuchin, the fundamental problem stems from the Great Recession. His investor group was the sole bidder to take control of the troubled bank IndyMac in 2009. The group struck a deal that left the Federal Deposit Insurance Commission responsible for taking as much as 80 per cent of the losses on former IndyMac assets and rebranded the troubled bank as OneWest.

The combination of OneWest’s profitability, government guarantees and foreclosure activities drew the ire of activist groups like the California Reinvestment Coalition. It found the bank to be consistently one of the most difficult to work out loan modifications with even though OneWest never drew a major response from government regulators.

By June of 2014, five years after taking over OneWest, Mnuchin sold the bank for $3.4 billion at a tremendous profit.

Colebrook said she learned the hard way about OneWest’s tactics, after the regional bank acquired her home lender, First Federal Bank of California, in late 2009.

In 1998, she bought a triplex for $248,000 in Hawthorne, California, not too far from Los Angeles International Airport.

She rented out two of the units and lived in the third. Colebrook refinanced her mortgage in order to renovate the property and help buy additional homes to generate rental income.

By the time the financial crisis struck in 2008, she had an interest-only mortgage on the triplex known as a “pick-a-payment” loan. Her monthly payments ran as high as $2,000 and only covered the interest on the debt. Then she got ensnarled in the economic downturn.

“All my tenants lost their jobs in the crash,” Colebrook said. “They couldn’t pay. It was a knock-on effect.”

Over five years, she tried unsuccessfully to adjust her loan with OneWest through the Treasury Department’s Home Affordable Modification Program. But she said that One West Bank lost paperwork, provided conflicting statements about ownership of the loan and fees and submitted charges that were unverified and caused her loan balance to balloon. By the time she lost her home in foreclosure in April 2015, the payoff balance totalled $517,662.

Colebrook said she is still challenging the foreclosure in court.

She now lives with her boyfriend in the small California city of San Luis Obispo. She volunteers at a homeless shelter, knowing that she could just as easily have ended up there.

“I cook at the homeless shelter because there but the grace of God go I.”
 

W. K. Lis

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From this link.

Donald Trump's daughter Ivanka 'to fight climate change' despite his scepticism
Mr Trump has said he has an 'open mind' on global warming since election victory

Ivanka Trump wants to become an ambassador for the fight against climate change, according to reports, despite her father’s repeated scepticism.

President-elect Donald Trump has described climate change as a hoax invented by the Chinese to manipulate US markets.

But his high-flying businesswoman daughter, who served as a key liberal-leaning personality within Mr Trump’s campaign, is reportedly lining up an environmental public role.

Politico claims a source says the issue will be one of the 35-year-old’s signature themes while the billionaire tycoon is in power.

“Ivanka is in the early stages of exploring how to use her spotlight to speak out on the issue,” said the unnamed source.

Former Apprentice personality Mr Trump, tweeting in 2012, said global warming was “created by and for the Chinese in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive”.

In 2014 he tweeted: “It’s late July and it is really cold outside in New York. Where the hell is GLOBAL WARMING???”

The 70-year-old property magnate, speaking at an oil and natural gas conference in North Dakota in May, even pledged to pull out of the 2015 Paris climate agreement.

The COP21 conference in December last year saw 195 countries, in a legally binding agreement, pledge to keep global warming well below a 2C increase.

The lead scientist behind a recent global warming report said Mr Trump’s stance on climate change is “catastrophic for humanity”.

There have been hints since the election that Mr Trump could adopt a more moderate climate-change policy, however.

Mr Trump’s White House chief of staff Reince Priebus said: “He’ll have an open mind about it but he has his default position, which is that most of it is a bunch of bunk, but he’ll have an open mind and listen to people.”

Asked in his long-awaited New York Times interview about the relationship of human activity and climate change, he said: “I think there is some connectivity. There is some, something.

“It depends on how much. It also depends on how much it’s going to cost our companies.”

Former fashion model Ms Trump, who has said she does not consider herself “categorically Republican or Democrat” and in 2007 donated $1,000 to Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, was seen as the de facto first lady throughout her dad’s campaign.

Family friend and businessman Carl Icahn has said: “I think her father respects her a great deal, and not just because she’s his daughter.”
 

Moonflake

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Here's a relevant bit from Jordan Peterson that posted in the general forum: http://www.c2cjournal.ca/2016/12/we...al&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

You said in
your interview with Gad Saad that free speech is – “The right and maybe the obligation to conduct discourse that is aimed at solving serious problems.” What happens when the discourse itself becomes weaponized?

Errors accumulate, and chaos ensues. I’ve studied mythology for a long time. The flood story means that if you warp things badly enough, everything falls apart. If you interfere with the mechanism by which people formulate problems, solve them, and negotiate their implementation, then problems accrue and multiply. That’s what a hydra is – cut off one head, seven grow back. These things can multiply out of control far faster than people think.

Is that part of what explains the results of the United States’ election?

The Democrats decided in the 1970s that they were going to abandon the working class and play identity politics, and the working class bit them. [Hillary Clinton] lost all the rust belt states. You really have to work pretty hard to lose the rust belt states if you’re a Democrat. So, they got exactly what was coming to them. And all the lefties are worried that Trump is a right-wing demagogue. It’s insane – he’s a liberal. He was a Clinton supporter. I mean, you could say he’s opportunistic, he’s narcissistic, but he’s no right wing demagogue. I don’t think he’s any more narcissistic or opportunistic that Newt Gingrich, I don’t think he’s any more narcissistic or opportunistic than Hillary Clinton. I don’t think what happened in the U.S. is a surprise at all. I think the left is saying “My god, this is a catastrophe.” It’s no more a catastrophe than Margaret Thatcher or Ronald Reagan as far as right-wing demagoguery goes. I don’t think it’s any different than the Reagan revolution, or what happened with Thatcher in terms of seriousness. Trump’s a moderate. He’s a noisy moderate, and he’s a bit of a populist, but fundamentally he’s still a moderate – and people are reacting as if he’s Hitler. You could get Hitler – and it certainly isn’t Trump. Was he a qualified candidate? No, I don’t think so, but he did a lot of things right, and one of those was he didn’t give the same canned speech all the time, and he wasn’t handled to death. People saw that and thought “he’s not crafting every utterance. He’s kind of jerk, but at least we know what he thinks.” Then people went into the ballot room, and they thought “fuck it, I’m voting for Trump” and that’s what they did. It was just like Brexit. The left pushed too hard, mucked about too much, and people thought “we’re not doing this anymore,” and then Democrats abandoned the working class. I’m not a Sanders admirer because I don’t think the kind of socialism he promotes is a tenable solution, but I certainly understand the working class in the United States has been screwed since 1975. Their social institutions are falling apart, their wages have been flat, the advances of India and China have all been on the backs of the American working class. Then the intellectuals think ‘oh, those rednecks, they’re stupid.’ Trades people are NOT stupid. In fact, they tend to have a lot more sense than most of the intellectuals that I know, even though they’re not as good at articulating their arguments.
 

tiffer24

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Day 26

The perils of living in a "post-factual world"...

http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/04/politics/gun-incident-fake-news/

A suspect arrested Sunday with an assault rifle at a Washington, DC pizzeria admitted he had come to investigate an online conspiracy theory, Washington's Metropolitan Police Department said Sunday evening in a statement.

Police have identified him as 28-year-old Edgar Maddison Welch of Salisbury, North Carolina. "During a post arrest interview this evening, the suspect revealed that he came to the establishment to self-investigate 'Pizza Gate' (a fictitious online conspiracy theory)," the police department said in a statement.

Comet Ping Pong's owner, James Alefantis and some employees of the restaurant were threatened last month after fake news reports -- shortly before Election Day -- charged Hillary Clinton and her campaign chairman John Podesta were involved in a child sex operation at the restaurant. The fake stories continued to proliferate online as Alefantis kept denying the charges.
 

tiffer24

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Day 28

Danielle Paquette@DPAQreport
3 hours ago
Chuck, a union leader in Indianapolis, says he is now getting death threats.

Donald J. Trump@realDonaldTrump
Chuck Jones, who is President of United Steelworkers 1999, has done a terrible job representing workers. No wonder companies flee country!


Evan Hill@evanchill
7 hours ago
This happened on Tuesday to the United States' first Somali-American lawmaker.

CzGn7vIXEAApTkl.jpg
 

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tiffer24

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Day 30

God help us all if Trump does not win an Emmy Award (and a Grammy, Oscar, Peabody, Pulitzer, Nobel, World's Greatest Boss) next year...

The Globe and Mail@globeandmail
7 mins ago
Trump remains producer on ‘New Celebrity Apprentice’ http://www.theglobeandmail.com//new...ce/article33280155/?cmpid=rss1&click=sf_globe

Trump’s continued stake in a TV series is yet another unusual aspect of the election of a businessman and reality star to the presidency. Questions have been raised on how his extensive holdings may intersect with his actions as president.
 
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