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TTC: Other Items (catch all)

ehlow

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Am I the only one here who finds busses to be almost as frustrating to drive behind as streetcars?

I'd absolutely hate to have each of our downtown streetcars replaced with 4 busses. That would truly be a disaster for drivers.

Whether buses or streetcars, it will always be slow to drive on those streets, due to the narrowness, lack of turn lanes, street parking, frequent intersections, high pedestrian & bicycle traffic. Many of these characteristics make the street very nice for pedestrians however.

It could be worse with buses, the road would be completely flooded with large buses, and they might need to attempt to keep switching lanes to get to the curb and then avoid parked cars. They may not even be able to fully get to the curb lane if there are parked cars and it's a long bus, blocking both lanes anyways. There would be higher operating costs since you'd need to run way more vehicles.

Also some may not care about this, but we'd be losing one of the key characteristics of Toronto. To me, streetcars in Toronto are like elevated subways in Chicago, it's a unique thing that sets our city apart.

I would like to see either underground or elevated transit going east-west downtown for faster travel near King or Queen, however, replacing streetcars with buses is a downgrade. Especially the new streetcars. But regardless, you're right, it doesn't matter, we already ordered tons of new streetcars and repaired the tracks & wires, so the matter is settled for the next 30 years, even the Ford brothers accept that :)

Edit: Oh yeah, for those who hate the fact that the streetcars block both lanes, this could be a solution:
http://goo.gl/maps/98zSU

Using a island stop beside the track.
 
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W. K. Lis

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On Tuesday, January 7, 2014, the school buses were cancelled for the day. Why? Where does one see school buses during the overnight? Parking lots of schools or apartments or home driveways. Where do the TTC buses stay overnight? The majority are in garages, so they can start up in the morning.

Where do the majority of subway trains stay overnight? Outside in the subway yards. Some are indoors, but most are outside. In previous years, I heard about some trains being stored in tunnel sidings. I’m guessing that those were for done for the old trains.

Where do the majority of streetcars stay overnight? Outside in the streetcar yards. Just like the subway trains.

Our streetcars are getting old. Why did the CLRV’s and ALRV’s use air, when the A-6, A-7, A-8, A-9, A-11, A-12, A-13, and A-14′s were all-electric? Maybe it was me, but those all-electric PCC’s were a better bred than the CLRV’s and ALRV’s. Hopefully, the Bombardier Outlook streetcars have the better genes this time.
 

ticky

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Another water main break inside a TTC station this morning. This time, St. Clair.

Seems a little unusual this keeps happening.
 

salsa

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Another water main break inside a TTC station this morning. This time, St. Clair.

Seems a little unusual this keeps happening.

At Queens Park there are buckets set up that collect leaks from the ceiling. The water in them is frozen. What a mess.

11859641196_14108f2d68_b.jpg
 

Electrify

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Andy Byford is making a speech right now about the TTC's inadequacies.

Having seen the numbers, like it or not, in Canada the vast majority of transit funding comes from the municipality. The premise that the TTC would be so much better if the province paid its fair share would mean that all transit in Canada sucks. While not usually as extensive, many Canadian transit systems have features such as free ride zones, two hour transfers, unlimited passes which pay for themselves after a reasonable amount of rides, etc. without crying poor at every opportunity and far less of their operating costs covered by higher levels of government.

The TTC has about 100 million more riders than STM, yet receives about $250 million from the city while Montreal gets $400 million.

(Source: Canadian Urban Transit Factbook, which I don't have in front of me and is not freely accessible online. So the numbers may not be 100% accurate as I am recalling them from my head, but the narrative is spot on)
 

rbt

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The TTC has about 100 million more riders than STM, yet receives about $250 million from the city while Montreal gets $400 million.

Those numbers are correct for operating expenses. The situation changes somewhat when you include the complete budget (capital and operating).

In fact, Toronto (municipality) put about the same into TTC's 2013 capital budget ($1.5B total; $638M from Toronto) as STM had as a total 2013 capital budget ($692M total; $560M was from province and feds, $142 from munipalities).

A large part of the difference in budgets between STM and TTC is expansion projects; $600M for Spadina extension, new LRT infrastructure, etc. That doesn't even count things like Union Station which only have a small piece in the TTC budget.

Toronto's capital contributions are going to increase over the next few of years as LRV delivery starts and the Scarborough subway gets underway.

The TTC has some serious capacity constraints, so at this time I would choose to fund capital over operating expenses any day. Ultimately, riders need to get to their destinations and that doesn't happen if they cannot get on the vehicle.
 
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Electrify

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Thing is that the TTC has the most trouble securing operating expenses, not capital. Politicians love the photo ops that capital projects provide, but actually running the vehicles is less sexy.

Not saying that capital is not important, you point out why it is pretty well. And securing funds is hardly a cakewalk either. Just when we hear that the reason the TTC isn't as good as it should be is because of the province not supporting the operating costs, the fact is that most systems in Canada don't get much from higher levels.
 

rbt

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Thing is that the TTC has the most trouble securing operating expenses, not capital. Politicians love the photo ops that capital projects provide, but actually running the vehicles is less sexy.

Expansion capital projects perhaps. General maintenance and legislated capital projects (like elevator installation, tunnel repairs, plumbing maintenance, etc.) are all regularly deferred. Expansion of the surface fleet at this time seems to be a bit of a challenge due to the personal tastes of the Mayor. The capital budget shortfall for mandatory or approved items is about $230M/year at the moment. Of course, the municipal portion of the new transit taxes would close that gap.

There are a large list of things in the not-yet-approved list which will result in significant pain if they are not funded; like the additional 60 LRVs.


Operating isn't really any tighter than it was pre-Miller; every vehicle owned is getting out on the road and getting left behind isn't a frequent occurrence. It is highly annoying that the city refuses to allow fare increases when they don't bump the subsidy though.
 
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M II A II R II K

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TTC’s Andy Byford says transit visionaries are needed at city hall

Read More: http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/201...eeded_at_city_hall_ttcs_andy_byford_says.html

.....

- “Whoever the mayor is and whoever the city councillors are, I want them to be pro-transit,” he told reporters following a lunch speech at the Toronto Region Board of Trade. The business event Thursday was attended by TTC chair Karen Stintz, who has declared her intention to run against Mayor Rob Ford. Painting a bleak picture of the system’s precarious finances, Byford insisted he won’t back away from the fight to wring more TTC funding from governments.

- Four years ago, the TTC delivered 462 million rides on a subsidy of $430 million. This year it is projected to carry 80 million more rides, on a city subsidy of just $427 million. That’s an increase from the past two years, but city council, later this month, will debate boosting the subsidy a little more to close the remaining $6 million gap in the TTC’s operating budget. The system’s $9-billion, 10-year capital spending picture looks dire right now, with a $2.3-billion shortfall in needed purchases of new equipment, repairs and maintenance, Byford said.

- Over the past 20 years, the TTC’s workforce has increased only 18 per cent, while service has been expanded 27 per cent and ridership has risen by 32 per cent. Byford acknowledged that it’s difficult to justify fare hikes to TTC riders, now adjusting to a New Year’s increase, when the service is increasingly crowded. But he promised that, given more money, he can transform the TTC into a modern, customer-oriented business. However, he is under no illusions. “We are still nowhere near good enough. Consistency of our service is till patchy, delays are far too frequent and our capability both in terms of equipment and people performance has a long way to go,” he said.

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