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WislaHD

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Imagine how much relief would be provided if phase 1 of the DRL went one extra stop west to Spadina? Two extra to Bathurst? I don't have much hope for this however.
Bathurst and Spading weren't even evaluated for potential stations: http://reliefline.ca/current-work/psa-results
This is my biggest issue with the DRL studies.

I am wondering if their logic is that extension to Spadina/Bathurst is incentive enough for a future expansion to Sunnyside/Dundas West?
 

Megaton327

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Which stop are you seeing this on the new streetcars that hasn't already had these machines for almost a year?
Bremner and Spadina is one excellent example, in either direction depending on time of day.
 

reaperexpress

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I've made a list of everything I think should be done right now (as in not long term) to aid in the flow of streetcars through the city.

I'm wondering if some people can comment on whats been done already, as I am not always sure, and offer any advice.

1. Traffic light control. (This is where an approaching TTC streetcar delays a light going red) - Apparently these are enabled, but damn if I could tell. They don't seem to be aggressive enough if they are.

2. Enforce the King ROW during rush hour. (I wonder how this could be enforced better, any ideas? License plate cameras like on the 407, ticket cars in the mail?)

3. Remove close streetcar stops. (Seems to be started, but at a snails pace aka TTC speed)

4. All door boarding. (Its just been started on the entire streetcar system, YAY! https://twitter.com/bradTTC/status/671810948479492096)

5. Illegal street parking (seems to be better after more enforcement, thoughts? I feel like on busy sections, street parking should be removed entirely)

Anything i'm missing?
The good news is that all but one of these (King ROW enforcement) are already underway.

1. Nearly all signals on streetcar routes already have Transit Signal Priority (TSP) which can extend green lights and shorten reds (though it can rarely shorten the cross street by more than a couple seconds due to required pedestrian crossing time). The main issues are pretty much as smably said, with wide variation in travel times through the detection zones. Hopefully the move to all-door loading will help by making dwell times more consistent. Eliminating stops can also help for the same reason. The biggest improvement I can see with respect to the TSP system would be to use phase insertion or rotation to allow waiting/approaching streetcars on dedicated ROWs move ahead of left turning cars. I'm only aware of one place in the city this is currently used for a straight-through movement. It's pretty easy to implement, it's just a matter of the City deciding that transit should receive a better level of service. Another benefit could be to use conditional priority, where late streetcars get higher priority than early ones. This would be especially helpful on high-frequency routes like Spadina where some streetcars may not get priority simply because another streetcar just passed through with priority.

3. Snail's pace it may be, but this is due to the mountains of obstacles placed up against the TTC by local citizens groups and councillors, not lack of trying on their part.

TSP already works that way -- you'll often see the signal change as soon as the streetcar enters the intersection. The issue is that it can't hold the light green indefinitely. I think the transit vehicle gets a 30-second green extension. Could it be extended? Sure, but keep in mind that pedestrians can't cross in any direction during the TSP phase, so longer green extensions would inconvenience more than just cars.
Almost. The maximum extension is indeed 30 seconds, but only 16 seconds of that is allowed to be during a Don't Walk indication for pedestrians (for example 14 during Walk and 16 during Don't Walk). At most intersections, all of the extension is provided during Walk which avoids Green/Don't Walk altogether. However that comes at the expense of motor traffic efficiency (lots of unneeded extension) and increased delays to people crossing the transit street.
 
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reaperexpress

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The TTC and TSP arent serious about transit signal issues.

Take the 501 for example; on The Queensway at South Kingsway there is a signal that stops both cars and streetcars for pedestrians only. The light will stop traffic (including streetcars) even if there are no pedestrians crossing and it holds traffic up for about 2 mins. Instead of having that, if they implemented a system where the lights would change only with a pedestrian pressing the cross button that would make things a lot more efficient.

Another example can be seen when streetcars are entering and exiting Humber Loop (late in the evening and overnight). It is not uncommon to see the transit signal on red while no cars are crossing Lake Shore, but yet the light will still hold a streetcar at the signal for up to 3 mins.

Simple fixes can solve these issues and improve service, but does the TTC or TSP care? Nope, not one bit.
I'm assuming that when you say TSP you mean ITSO, the City's signal operations people.

That signal on The Queensway already operates using a pedestrian pushbutton. If the pedestrian signal is coming up when there's no pedestrian, then it's broken and you should call 311. And looking on Google Earth, the crossing distance is 31.7 which means that the timing is probably 7 sec Walk, 27 sec flashing Don't Walk and 4 sec All-way Red. That adds up to 38 seconds, which means that you really need to get your stopwatch checked.

But even when it's working properly it could be still be improved. Separating the crossing into three independent signals (WB, Transit, EB) would vastly reduce delay for everyone. The one-way car signals could be perfectly co-ordinated with Windermere (unlike the current 2-way signal) and the transit signal could easily guarantee a green for streetcars by detecting them far enough away to finish the pedestrian countdown. And pedestrians wouldn't need to wait as long to cross, since the car signals could respond instantly during the portions of the cycle where cars would get stopped at the previous/next signal anyway, and the transit signal would display Walk whenever there's no streetcar approaching (i.e pretty much all the time).

The main advantage of the current layout is that it's way cheaper since it's all operated together with one set of equipment. The city probably just decided that it wasn't worth the amount of (tax) money it would cost to achieve an excellent level of service there.

A couple other similar intersections are the two on Fleet Street/Lakeshore west of Bathurst: Operating Fleet independently from Lakeshore would vastly reduce delays for both pedestrians and transit.

If the Humber Loop signal is delaying streetcars for 3 minutes, then it's broken and you should call 311. When it's working properly it provides near-zero delay to streetcars - just like you'd find in the top transit cities in Europe.

It is rather ignorant to claim that no one cares simply on the basis that there are signals you don't like, and claiming that quick fixes don't happen is simply prejudiced and false.

Also note that in any infrastructure operating organization, when there is something that could be improved and another thing that is broken, fixing the latter will always take precedence.
 
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TheTigerMaster

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A question for signal priority experts. I've noticed at a specific intersection on the 32 Eglinton West, every time the bus stops for passengers (probably 90% of the time) the light turns red, causing the bus to be delayed longer. Is this a badly calibrated signal priority?
 

reaperexpress

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A question for signal priority experts. I've noticed at a specific intersection on the 32 Eglinton West, every time the bus stops for passengers (probably 90% of the time) the light turns red, causing the bus to be delayed longer. Is this a badly calibrated signal priority?
Nope, Eglinton West doesn't have signal priority.

More likely it's signals that are simply timed really poorly for buses (which often corresponds to being timed really well for cars).

If it's west of Scarlett then it's operated by SCOOT, which optimizes timings in real time for cars, which could anti-optimize them for buses. You can check any signal's control system and whether it has transit priority (noted as "Pre-emption:Transit") on Mirasan.ca, a maps-based application using the City's Open Data.
 

Napoleon

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It would be a good idea to install several mid car presto readers. That way people don't have to fight to scan their cards the moment they board.
I wonder if they could implement something like is done in Amsterdam where there are two designated boarding doors and the rest are designated exit doors. Part of the motivation there is that there's a mid-car conductor that sells tickets/enforces fare payment. It provides a nice one-way flow through the cars.
 

drum118

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I wonder if they could implement something like is done in Amsterdam where there are two designated boarding doors and the rest are designated exit doors. Part of the motivation there is that there's a mid-car conductor that sells tickets/enforces fare payment. It provides a nice one-way flow through the cars.
I found it very strange starting with Glasgow to Amsterdam and beyond, drivers having a cash drawer in front of them selling fare media and collecting cash in full view of the public. Try doing that here. which was done at one time. It didn't take that much extra time to do.

Amsterdam Trams were more strange with gate at some doors for exit only and having a 2nd collector selling/collecting the fare media. Amsterdam was the only place I saw this out of the 26 systems I was on. It did help the flow of riders, but still cause bunching on the tram.

A lot of tram systems had fare media at all stations & platforms.

Presto is only require at entrance doors and about time riders understand that they need to have their card ready before boarding. Waiting to get it out after getting on is unacceptably and leads to service delays. This apply to current collection today. I can see someone one not having their fare ready if they are running to catch X vehicle or just arrived at the stop as the vehicle pulls up. I see this all the time on buses using Presto/fare media/transfer today and the back log they cause doing so.
 

TheTigerMaster

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Presto is only require at entrance doors and about time riders understand that they need to have their card ready before boarding. Waiting to get it out after getting on is unacceptably and leads to service delays. This apply to current collection today. I can see someone one not having their fare ready if they are running to catch X vehicle or just arrived at the stop as the vehicle pulls up. I see this all the time on buses using Presto/fare media/transfer today and the back log they cause doing so.
This really is unavoidable. Which is why I think that mid-vehicle fare PRESO readers should be installed. It'll allow people to get on the vehicles without delay, and they can get their PRESO card out and scan without blocking anyone else.
 

Jonny5

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Twitter has sponsored the TTC WiFi network. As a result it has been restricted to users with Twitter accounts only. You must login to your Twitter account to use the WiFi, which will then feed to Twitter all sites you visit and apps you use.
 

Amare

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I'm assuming that when you say TSP you mean ITSO, the City's signal operations people.

It is rather ignorant to claim that no one cares simply on the basis that there are signals you don't like, and claiming that quick fixes don't happen is simply prejudiced and false.
Thanks for the correction, that is indeed the division I was referring to. You provided excellent info on your post.

I beg to differ on my point where I said no one cares, because ROW transit signalling priority has been an issue that has plagued Spadina, St.Clair, and various points of Queen's Quay for many years. The issue can be resolved with some work, but it is clear nobody is interested because the same issues exist today. The thing is, when we have new LRT lines that open in ~10 years (Eglinton and Finch) the city will probably manage to reduce the efficiently in which those lines operate if they dont start taking transit signaling priority seriously.
 

LNahid2000

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It is very unfortunate that one would have to have a Twitter account just to use TTC Wi-Fi.

Not everyone chooses to use Twitter.

By the looks of it, it is a major breach of privacy.
How is it a breach of privacy? No one is forcing you to use the wifi.
 

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