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TTC: Easier Access Phase III

Yonge TOmorrow and the College Station renovation are separate projects. When College is finished, Yonge Street will look the same until a few years later when YongeTOmorrow takes shape.

They are separate, but the gap isn't large.

The TTC project has a completion date of Q4 2023.

Yonge Tomorrow has a construction schedule of 2023-2025.

So subject to staging the gap will range between 1-2 years.
 

Christie Station​

Easier Access​

The TTC’s Easier Access Program is making subway stations accessible. Construction at Christie Station is projected to begin in mid-2021 and be completed by the end of 2023.

20190610%20-%20Christie%20.jpg


This work will include:

Barrier-free path from the main entrance to all levels of the station including installation of:
  • Two forward motion elevators to serve the concourse level, westbound and eastbound platforms
  • Tactile walking surface indicators added to the top landing of stairs to platforms
  • Automatic sliding doors
  • Improved signage
Further details on TTC’s Easier Access Program and how we are making transit more accessible can be found here.

For further information:​

Niki Angelis
Community Liaison
416-981-1532
niki.angelis@ttc.ca


Summerhill Station​

Easier Access​

The TTC’s Easier Access Program is making subway stations accessible. Construction at Summerhill Station is projected to begin in late-2021 and be completed by the end of 2023.

Summerhill%20Entrance.JPG


This work will include:

Barrier-free path from the main entrance to all levels of the station including installation of:
  • Two forward motion elevators to serve both northbound and southbound platforms
  • A new main entrance to accommodate the new elevators and accessible fare gates (in addition to the standard fare gates).
  • Improved signage
  • CCTV – Security cameras along the accessible pathway
Further details on TTC’s Easier Access Program and how we are making transit more accessible can be found here.

For further information:​

Niki Angelis
Community Liaison
416-981-1532
niki.angelis@ttc.ca
 

Christie Station​

Easier Access​

The TTC’s Easier Access Program is making subway stations accessible. Construction at Christie Station is projected to begin in mid-2021 and be completed by the end of 2023.

20190610%20-%20Christie%20.jpg


This work will include:

Barrier-free path from the main entrance to all levels of the station including installation of:
  • Two forward motion elevators to serve the concourse level, westbound and eastbound platforms
  • Tactile walking surface indicators added to the top landing of stairs to platforms
  • Automatic sliding doors
  • Improved signage
Further details on TTC’s Easier Access Program and how we are making transit more accessible can be found here.

For further information:​

Niki Angelis
Community Liaison
416-981-1532
niki.angelis@ttc.ca


Summerhill Station​

Easier Access​

The TTC’s Easier Access Program is making subway stations accessible. Construction at Summerhill Station is projected to begin in late-2021 and be completed by the end of 2023.

Summerhill%20Entrance.JPG


This work will include:

Barrier-free path from the main entrance to all levels of the station including installation of:
  • Two forward motion elevators to serve both northbound and southbound platforms
  • A new main entrance to accommodate the new elevators and accessible fare gates (in addition to the standard fare gates).
  • Improved signage
  • CCTV – Security cameras along the accessible pathway
Further details on TTC’s Easier Access Program and how we are making transit more accessible can be found here.

For further information:​

Niki Angelis
Community Liaison
416-981-1532
niki.angelis@ttc.ca
I'm wondering what the term forward montion elevator means does it mean that it would have doors on two sides so that you enter it from one side on one level and another on the other?
 
While the TTC is at it, they should fix the escalator in Christie station:

TTC_Christie_Escalator.JPG

Much like the one at Broadview, it can't be fixed. There isn't enough room between the floor of the mezzanine and the ceiling of the train tunnel below to allow for the equipment underneath the escalator to be located - thus it needed to be raised.

Dan
 
I'm wondering what the term forward montion elevator means does it mean that it would have doors on two sides so that you enter it from one side on one level and another on the other?
The report on Lansdowne uses the term "forward motion elevator" to describe the street level to concourse elevator:

All three seem to be elevators where ingress and egress would happen through different sets of doors, so that may be what it means.
 
Much like the one at Broadview, it can't be fixed. There isn't enough room between the floor of the mezzanine and the ceiling of the train tunnel below to allow for the equipment underneath the escalator to be located - thus it needed to be raised.

Dan

Question for you Dan.

Understanding that it wasn't feasible at the time of construction; and that it wouldn't be feasible thinking conventionally, can you imagine a reasonable way to find the space?

Its my understanding (and please correct me if I'm wrong, because this is not my wheel house), that you need 7ft clearance under the bottom of an escalator.

This escalator appears, to the naked eye, to be positioned over the centre-columns between the tracks ( I haven't seen the schematic.).

Could room not be cheated here?

Obviously its an expensive fix, if feasible, and there has to be some reasonable limit as to cost.

I was just thinking there might be a creative choice that's plausible.
 
The report on Lansdowne uses the term "forward motion elevator" to describe the street level to concourse elevator:

All three seem to be elevators where ingress and egress would happen through different sets of doors, so that may be what it means.
That's what I was thinking it's just not a term I've ever seen before.
 
Question for you Dan.

Understanding that it wasn't feasible at the time of construction; and that it wouldn't be feasible thinking conventionally, can you imagine a reasonable way to find the space?

Its my understanding (and please correct me if I'm wrong, because this is not my wheel house), that you need 7ft clearance under the bottom of an escalator.

This escalator appears, to the naked eye, to be positioned over the centre-columns between the tracks ( I haven't seen the schematic.).

Could room not be cheated here?

Obviously its an expensive fix, if feasible, and there has to be some reasonable limit as to cost.

I was just thinking there might be a creative choice that's plausible.
Station Fixation has an article about this. From the article:
"At Christie, the escalator was a retrofit, installed well after the construction of the station. The device’s base is located above the track ceiling below. There physically isn’t enough room for the mechanical equipment at the base of the escalator, for it to extend all the way down to the floor of the mezzanine level.
Similar escalators with steps may be found at Broadview and at King."


Transit Toronto also mentions the escalator:
"One of the odder features of Christie station is the escalator leading down from the main entrance to the mezzanine level. The escalator bottoms out a couple of feet above the mezzanine level floor, and passengers have to proceed down a short flight of four steps. This is because this escalator was added after the station opened. At this point, the escalator is directly above the subway tracks, and there is not enough space between the mezzanine floor and the platform ceiling to fit the mechanical workings of the escalator at its base."

 
Station Fixation has an article about this. From the article:
"At Christie, the escalator was a retrofit, installed well after the construction of the station. The device’s base is located above the track ceiling below. There physically isn’t enough room for the mechanical equipment at the base of the escalator, for it to extend all the way down to the floor of the mezzanine level.
Similar escalators with steps may be found at Broadview and at King."


Transit Toronto also mentions the escalator:
"One of the odder features of Christie station is the escalator leading down from the main entrance to the mezzanine level. The escalator bottoms out a couple of feet above the mezzanine level floor, and passengers have to proceed down a short flight of four steps. This is because this escalator was added after the station opened. At this point, the escalator is directly above the subway tracks, and there is not enough space between the mezzanine floor and the platform ceiling to fit the mechanical workings of the escalator at its base."


I wonder what the extent of the shortfall is though.

If its over 1M, that's certainly problematic to overcome.

But were it much less, one might conceivably add an extra step up and raise the grade of the mezzanine.

I'm not seeking to engage in any silliness, I simply don't know, having not seen the schematic for the station, what is or is not feasible.

I don't imagine the TTC would have entertained that option as the time of adding the escalator.

Its certainly an elaborate and expensive solution, even if feasible, which it may well not be.

Likewise, so long as any intrusion from the escalator pit into the platform level didn't conflict w/train movement or essential structure; its plausible to imagine a rather expensive solution.

Is it worth it? Probably not. I'm just curious.
 

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