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Transit City Plan

Which transit plan do you prefer?

  • Transit City

    Votes: 87 81.3%
  • Ford City

    Votes: 20 18.7%

  • Total voters
    107

W. K. Lis

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When the Queensway right-of-way opened in July 18, 1957, the only left turn allowed was at what is now called Colborne Lodge Dr.. It was then a three phase system: both directions on Colborne Lodge Dr., eastbound Queensway, and westbound Queensway. The other intersections had no left turns.
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W. K. Lis

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Instead of wasting money on transit city, wouldn't it be cheaper to give the poor free cars every 10 years or so? Those that can't drive could take the bus...every 30 minutes on the major roads.

Bonus: more jobs would be saved in the auto industry.

You just have to look at cities like Atlanta in the United States to see what happens when you use the car for everything. Garages in the downtown. Empty buildings and parking lots on weekends. Nobody living downtown.
 

lordmandeep

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Bonus: more jobs would be saved in the auto industry.


Give me a break...


Auto sales for Toyota are down 30% as well but you do not see them yelling and screaming.

Its because they adapt to change. They cut production and then do not pay their workers extravagant benefits.

The auto industry needs a big correction and outdated and unsustainable businesses should be eliminated during it.
 

RedRocket191

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Instead of wasting money on transit city, wouldn't it be cheaper to give the poor free cars every 10 years or so? Those that can't drive could take the bus...every 30 minutes on the major roads.

Bonus: more jobs would be saved in the auto industry.

One word:

CONGESTION
 

golodhendil

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EDIT: To add, just because a streetcar runs in its own lanes doesn't mean that it is LRT. I mean technically it is, but it is generally accepted as simply a streetcar in a ROW. For it to be genuine LRT, a transit line must have most of the following:

-Double-ended vehicles - no loops
-POP, or a ticket booth at the station
-Stops spaced farther apart
-Traffic signal priority
-Headway-based operation would also help immensely, with the "next vehicle signs"
-Obviously has its own lanes
-Preferably no left turns anywhere on the street it's running on, but there's a way around that (*cough cough* transit signal priority)
But as always, definitions for these things are mushy, and many systems in the world straddle the boundaries between streetcars and LRT, if there is even a real one.

For example, the Boston Green Line system runs the gamut from subway, elevated, private ROW with no grade-crossings, median ROW with grade-crossings, to street running (since they run 2-car articulated trains, it's quite a scene to see 50m trains turning tight corners and sharing the street with traffic). The system certainly uses "LRT"-grade rolling stock that are double-ended, but they have loops and rarely ever use the other end. They have the capacity for signal priority but doesn't use it. Station interval ranges from 200 m on the street-running sections, to 500 m in the subway and median-ROW sections, to 1 km on the private ROW sections, and scheduling is timetable-based. Underground/elevated stations have ticket gates, ROW stations have a mixed POP/pay-at-the-front system, streetside stations are pay-at-front only. So, is this system a "streetcar" system, or an "LRT" system? Or does it matter?
 

CDL.TO

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But as always, definitions for these things are mushy, and many systems in the world straddle the boundaries between streetcars and LRT, if there is even a real one.

For example, the Boston Green Line system runs the gamut from subway, elevated, private ROW with no grade-crossings, median ROW with grade-crossings, to street running (since they run 2-car articulated trains, it's quite a scene to see 50m trains turning tight corners and sharing the street with traffic). The system certainly uses "LRT"-grade rolling stock that are double-ended, but they have loops and rarely ever use the other end. They have the capacity for signal priority but doesn't use it. Station interval ranges from 200 m on the street-running sections, to 500 m in the subway and median-ROW sections, to 1 km on the private ROW sections, and scheduling is timetable-based. Underground/elevated stations have ticket gates, ROW stations have a mixed POP/pay-at-the-front system, streetside stations are pay-at-front only. So, is this system a "streetcar" system, or an "LRT" system? Or does it matter?

Great post, 100% true. Toronto's Transit City definition of LRT isn't the definition of LRT. In Europe, most people would look at that and call it a high-quality tram system.
 

W. K. Lis

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The TRANSIT CITY LIGHT RAIL PLAN: STATUS UPDATE FOR FEBRUARY 2009 is now available in PDF format.

It includes comments like:
• significant progress is being made on accelerated environmental assessments for all seven Transit City light rail lines, and the Scarborough RT, as described in this report;
• detailed engineering and design work is proceeding to allow the start of construction this fall on the first of the Transit City light rail lines – the Sheppard East LRT;
• preliminary engineering work is also underway for the Etobicoke-Finch West light rail line and for the maintenance and storage facilities needed for the line;
• as with all major capital projects, Transit City needs committed and predictable funding to allow continuous and uninterrupted progress, to avoid project delays which would affect planned construction and start dates and associated cost;
• TTC, City, and Metrolinx staff are meeting on a continuous and regular basis in order to complete “Benefit Case Analysis†studies for each of the Transit City light rail lines and for the Scarborough RT, in support of Metrolinx’s consideration of these lines for funding, and
• there have been a number of requests to extend or modify the original Transit City light rail lines, and all such requests will be undertaken as follow-up phases of the original EA-related work, subject to Commission- or Council-endorsement, and subject to provision of the required funding for the expanded scope of work, as explained in this report.

Click on the above link to download the PDF.
 

jks

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OMG, I can't believe it, but they actually recognized that changing the SRT to Light-Rail, and joining it with a COMPLETELY GRADE SEPARATED Eglinton LRT, to form a continouous line!! A fully grade-separated eglinton LRT!! That's awesome, and then, when the need arises, it can be easily changed into subway. And, the Richview Corridor is likely to be used!! I am almost as excited as when I saw that the DRL was actually endorsed by City Coucil. Maybe things are finally looking up for this city.
 

ShonTron

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While I still prefer a BD extension to STC, that's actually a really interesting idea, especially having a fully grade-separated line through Scarborough. Then all that needs to be done is to bash some heads together and get that grade-separated line where there's no issue - the Richview ROW on Eglinton West. Basically, Eglinton could then become a no-frills subway using LRT stock (just not having subway capacity that would be needed on say a DRL)
 
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Towered

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Wow, a request to extend the Jane LRT to Lakeshore via the South Kingsway? It makes sense of course, but given the narrow road width it would have to be tunneled and I can just picture massive Swansea NIMBY outrage.
 

W. K. Lis

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Wow, a request to extend the Jane LRT to Lakeshore via the South Kingsway? It makes sense of course, but given the narrow road width it would have to be tunneled and I can just picture massive Swansea NIMBY outrage.

I can see tunneling at the north end of the South Kingsway (to avoid the traffic jam along Bloor), but it could be out in the open south of Bloor and sharing the road with traffic. At Morningside Avenue, it would have to be widened to allow for a private stop platform, and then rejoining the traffic until the Queensway where it would have to be widened again to join up with the Waterfront West LRT. The only stations/stops would be at Jane and Bloor, Morningside, and the Queensway or Waterfront West LRT.

However, shouldn't the TTC first return with a South Kingsway bus first. Maybe as an extension to the 55 Warren Park bus.
 
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