The Well | 174.03m | 46s | RioCan | Hariri Pontarini

ProjectEnd

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I'm curious to see if the southern residential towers will use a different hue of glass/curtain wall on their north and south facades, and if there will be any big material differences between the Rio Can rental tower and the two Tridel towers.
AFAIK the podium is also Antamex but the towers are a different supplier.
 

interchange42

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I get the feeling this might be an unpopular opinion on here but... why? Should they also take a ribbing for the non-functional brick panels planned for the Wellington facades? Or the stone veneers used elsewhere? At the end of the day, aren't they all different shades of adornment masquerading as structural elements?

The architecture nerd in me also thinks structural cross bracing would have been really cool. But even though that wasn't ultimately possible (presumably for reasons beyond HPA's control), I'm still glad they decided to give this building more personality than strictly structurally necessary.
It's not a binary situation, there are shades of gray here that include a difference between cross bracing that has no effect other than aesthetic, and a cladding material that is a more attractive veneer covering a less appealing one: you still have to clad the building, so it might as well be pleasing to the eye (and the brick veneers should provide decades of maintenance-free wear).

Also in the shades of gray department: I used the word 'ribbing' which indicates a good-natured poke, not a full-on dressing down. I know the cross-bracing isn't a crime against humanity… it's just not functionally honest 'tis all!

42
 

ChesterCopperpot

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I get the feeling this might be an unpopular opinion on here but... why? Should they also take a ribbing for the non-functional brick panels planned for the Wellington facades? Or the stone veneers used elsewhere? At the end of the day, aren't they all different shades of adornment masquerading as structural elements?

The architecture nerd in me also thinks structural cross bracing would have been really cool. But even though that wasn't ultimately possible (presumably for reasons beyond HPA's control), I'm still glad they decided to give this building more personality than strictly structurally necessary.

No - but Wallman might
 

soufflot

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It's not a binary situation, there are shades of gray here that include a difference between cross bracing that has no effect other than aesthetic, and a cladding material that is a more attractive veneer covering a less appealing one: you still have to clad the building, so it might as well be pleasing to the eye (and the brick veneers should provide decades of maintenance-free wear).

Also in the shades of gray department: I used the word 'ribbing' which indicates a good-natured poke, not a full-on dressing down. I know the cross-bracing isn't a crime against humanity… it's just not functionally honest 'tis all!

42

Totally fair! I'm not trying to come down on you or anyone who doesn't appreciate the cross bracing, nor do I really think brick veneers are a 1:1 comparison. Indeed the prevailing wisdom here seems to be that their functional dishonesty makes the bracing a poor design choice. I'm just trying to express an alternative view that, for me at least, the hi-tech adornment is still refreshing and welcome in a city where most contemporary office projects, though crisp, are architecturally restrained to a fault. So I counter your rib with one hearty pat on the back for our pals at HPA. =P
 

bilked

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871860E4-C959-4F61-994B-065397755B32.jpeg
 

ProjectEnd

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It's very much turning into Lloyd's Building On a Budget. Still a handsome build though!
Indeed!
Outside of a few design cues, they're really not similar at all. Lloyds was a statement head office for a 300+ year old insurance institution, and cost between $650-700 (2020 rates) / ft. due to extreme customization. The Well is a speculative office building, designed to make money for its developers and asset managers (Allied and RioCan). I would be surprised if it's being constructed for more than $350-400 / ft.

There's very little similarity outside of the fact that they're both 'buildings'...
 

Lyphe

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It's funny, as Covid raged, I kept thinking about the massive scale of this project and wondering if it made Riocan nervous.
Today they cut their dividend.
That said, the financials show them to be in excellent health with lots of liquidity, but it is interesting to see them making a move to conserve cash and be prudent.
 

condovo

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It's funny, as Covid raged, I kept thinking about the massive scale of this project and wondering if it made Riocan nervous.
Today they cut their dividend.
That said, the financials show them to be in excellent health with lots of liquidity, but it is interesting to see them making a move to conserve cash and be prudent.
I guess the cheap, green glass is part of their move to conserve cash. :rolleyes:
 

DtTO

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It's such a shame that they decided to use opaque panels at the intersection of the lines in the X's 😔

Overall, I still really like how this buildings looks. The massing and cladding are fantastic, IMO.
 

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