The Well | 174.03m | 46s | RioCan | Hariri Pontarini

AHK

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I hope it’s faster than every 3 weeks per floor or else we are going to be watching this get built for a long time yet. Should be closer to 1 week.

covid likely threw a wrench in it as well as the transfer of floor plate size which usually slows things down.
One floor per week is about as good as it gets for typical floors of a high rise residential tower with a standard floor plate size - 750 square meters or less. With office tower requirements and current construction practices, I am not aware of any recent concrete framed buildings that have come anywhere near that speed. Steel girder framed buildings would be faster - no time required to set up the forming, pour and cure the concrete pillars before moving on to doing the floor slab itself. Working hour restrictions and present day working safety practices mean that we will probably never see the kind of pace that some buildings achieved in the last century. Case in point - the Empire State Building, which started construction in March 1930, achieved the rate of four and a half floors erected per week.

First occupancy of The Well office tower is anticipated to be first quarter of 2022. At an average rate of two and a half to three weeks per floor (including the mechanical penthouse levels), the building should be topped out in the late spring to early summer 2021 timeframe. With another nine to twelve months or so for completion of the base building electrical, mechanical systems and interior tenant fit up of the first floors to be occupied - that would be consistent with the anticipated Q1 2022 occupancy date.

Again - I am not in the construction industry, just a lay observer, and would defer to anyone associated with the project or who might inside knowledge of the actual construction time frames.
 

everydayhim

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They could have done a beefier job with the appearance of the cross bars where they connect to the walls.
Maybe with a visible bolt.
What they have looks like a wall-mounted flag holder.

NY Times Building NYC:

That's because the NYT building is a real, structural cross brace that's also expertly crafted with the help of Piano.

I'm not sure trying to further fake gusset plates and pinned connections would've looked that great..
 

PatM

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The cladding for the north stairwell is looking quite good!
Anyone know what type of cladding material they're using? I'm assuming it's the same metallic finish used for rest of the "structural" elements?

Well.jpg
 

khristopher

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