Toronto Beacon Condos | 124.66m | 35s | Sorbara | Wallman Architects

...how does GibsonSquare connect to NorthYorkCityCentre?

A tunnel is coming soon. I'm not exactly sure where it will be (most likely will be accessed from the public parking on P1 at Gibson), but we have been told that the developer recently received approval from City of Toronto to proceed with construction.

This project will require coordination and planning with Toronto Hydro, Enbridge Gas, and other utilities, which will be the first phase. Then the actual construction will begin, with completion estimated for spring of 2016.
 
there is a tunnel stub built in the north end of Gibson Square's P1 level provides for connection to the Beacon site ... pedestrians can walk across the Gibson Square's P1 level (aka public parking) to get to the other tunnel at the south end to cross under Park Home Avenue

AFAIK the plan is for the Gibson Square to build a tunnel from the SE-ish corner of the site to cross Park Home Avenue to connect into the concourse level of Novatel ...

Here's a City staff report showing the alignment:
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-59122.pdf
 
Found this City Planning staff final report, in Attachment 3 (page 20 of PDF) is a underground plan that shows the tunnel connection points to the north and south that I've highlighted in red ... the plan has been slightly revised based on what I saw on site, but largely is consistent:

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2010/ny/bgrd/backgroundfile-27578.pdf

 
Should also have at-grade TTC subway entrance at base of South Tower,... where? Can't really see any stairs or elevators to anywhere near the underground pedestrian tunnel where a subway entrance would make sense,....

From page 5 of Final report,...
"A below grade pedestrian access is to be provided that would connect to the building on the south side of Park Home Avenue and provide access to the North York Centre subway station. An at-grade subway
entrance is proposed at the base of the south residential tower that will be accessible to the public. A walkway is also being provided through the first level of the parking garage to connect to the proposed pedestrian tunnel for the Sam-Sor development site to the north"

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2010/ny/bgrd/backgroundfile-27578.pdf

The above are indirect subway connections through North York City Centre,.... Way back, the GibsonSquare TTC connection was to be a direct connection to the north side of the north automated collector area of North York Centre subway station (which is now just a black wall within the paid for area),.... When NorthYorkEd mentioned subway connector to be built by Spring 2016 (things take a lot longer around here! Emerald Park subway connection started in summer 2014,.... maybe finish Spring 2016, likely later!),... I thought, this would make sense since there'll have to dig along Yonge Street (again!),... but there should be a Yonge Street Streetscape construction project next year anyway,....

BTW, some of the ideas floating around from the city includes taking out the tree lined centre median & left turn lanes in North York Centre to get enough space to put in protected on-road bike lanes on Yonge Street,.... Problem is, there really isn't enough north-south cyclist on Yonge Street to justify it,.... and for many of the area condo residents stuck in 500 square feet condos, a tree lined Yonge Street with trees along the side and centre median provides calming greenery for a great evening walk on Yonge Street.

Anyways, direct or indirect subway connections,.... for direct subway connections like HullmarkCentre and EmeraldPark, developer pays TTC for a subway connection fee in the millions of dollars,.... I recall HullmarkCentre paid around $6million for their 2 connections. Skimming through the the 2013 document provided by Solaris it seems the only city revenue is $2,722.50 per annum for first 5 years,.... that's chump change,... seems these indirect connections probably bring best bang for lowest buck for developer.
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2013/gm/bgrd/backgroundfile-59122.pdf
 
Problem is, there really isn't enough north-south cyclist on Yonge Street to justify it

By chance, do you know the numbers or is this from observation?

I cycle and live in the neighborhood. The thing with this stretch of Yonge is I don't feel safe as a cyclist, so instinctively I choose Beecroft or Doris. If there was a protected lane, I'd use it and I'm sure many others would as well. The Fed Government Building (both front and back) and library/swim pool bike racks are full of bikes, so I'm sure I'm not the only one that cycles in the area.

So if we followed your logic, by judging the volume of cars on Yonge, another car lane is justified. But this is not the direction I want my neighborhood to go!
 
It would be really sad if they took away the central median of trees. It makes the area unique. Many of those trees have died or have many dead branches since the winter storm of 2013/14. If they are to add bike lanes to Yonge, they should remove parking and add another row of trees to make the sidewalks more pleasant to walk on. Beecroft and Doris are much more pleasant walking environment due to the tall trees, especially on Doris.
 
It would be really sad if they took away the central median of trees. It makes the area unique. Many of those trees have died or have many dead branches since the winter storm of 2013/14. If they are to add bike lanes to Yonge, they should remove parking and add another row of trees to make the sidewalks more pleasant to walk on. Beecroft and Doris are much more pleasant walking environment due to the tall trees, especially on Doris.


Actually, most of the trees in the tree lined centre median from about North York Boulevard to Parkview aren't dead but are suffering from Dutch Elm Disease,... which travel from the root of one tree to the next,... thus it effects entire rows of trees,.... it seems to limit the amount of water that reaches the upper part of the tree,... see first photo in front of Mel Lastman Square. This is one of the negative consequences of using the same species of tree throughout the entire tree-lined centre median,.... the city should use more variety of different tree species,...
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Most of those trees in the tree lined centre median from North York Boulevard to Spring Garden are generally fine,... see second photo in front of Ultima Condo and Madison Centre,... notice how healthy tree lined centre median divides northbound and southbound traffic on Yonge Street and make it look less intimidating,.... the streetscape look more pedestrian friendly and even provide jay-walkers a safe area,...
IMG_8903[1].JPG


Removing parking for bike lanes,... parking is already removed for rush hour traffic,... and it's still not enough. Consider that in the Yonge corridor (just between Doris & Beecroft from highway 401 to Finch Hydro Corridor) can add another 50% more condo towers,... that'll be 50% more density than now,.... then add in North Yonge Study of Yonge Corridor north of Finch Hydro Corridor to Steeles that will increase the overall Yonge Corridor density from highway 401 to Steeles by double or triple current density!!! That's how many more cars, transit rider, pedestrians and cyclist other road/corridor users this area will get in a few decades! We're not adding a small percentage,... but rather doubling or tripling whatever we already have now! Bottom line: Yonge corridor north of Highway 401 to Sheppard already has some of the worst traffic congestion in North America,.. and it'll get worst,.. by doubling or tripling depending on new condo height limits.

Yonge Street from Highway 401 to Steeles is relatively vibrant throughout the day and evening, mainly because of the diversity of restaurants and stores - most of these establishments are ethnic - mainly Persian, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, etc,... these shops rely on a large geographical area for the customer base,... many drive to these establishments,... if you take away parking spaces, you take away business for these shops,... their customers will just drive somewhere else where parking is available like PacificMall, Highway 7 & Leslie, etc,... and our Yonge Street area business will deteriorate.
If you try to make the arguement that on-road bike lanes on Yonge will bring more cyclist to these Yonge Street businesses,... well, most cyclists are not visible minorities,... and are not likely to visit establishments that caters to visible minorities,...
 

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By chance, do you know the numbers or is this from observation?

I cycle and live in the neighborhood. The thing with this stretch of Yonge is I don't feel safe as a cyclist, so instinctively I choose Beecroft or Doris. If there was a protected lane, I'd use it and I'm sure many others would as well. The Fed Government Building (both front and back) and library/swim pool bike racks are full of bikes, so I'm sure I'm not the only one that cycles in the area.

With protected bike lanes on Yonge Street, the area gridlock traffic congestion will continue to get worst at a faster rate,... while riding on these protected bike lanes on Yonge Street, you'll be huffing and puffing exhaust fumes!


The vast majority of area cyclist are recreational cyclists,.... not commuter cyclist,... so why is the city considering putting in cycling infrastructure along a commuter route like Yonge Street??? A 2006 city report shows only 0.3-0.4% of Ward23 (Willowdale - North York Centre) residents are commuter cyclist (well below the 8-17% in parts of downtown Toronto and below the 1.1-1.3% city wide average). A more recent city study had Ward23 commuter cycling numbers so low, it wouldn't officially publish them. The majority of Ward23 commuter cyclist don't ride north-south on Yonge Street but actually travel east-west to the subway station on Yonge street,.... Look along Yonge Street between 401 to Steeles,... where do you see bikes locked up along Yonge Street? At subway station entrances,... generally about 10 bikes at Yonge&Poyntz/Annedale, about 20 bikes at SheppardCentre, about 30 NorthYorkCityCentre, about 15 EmpressWalk on Yonge,.... another 15-20 in the rear,.... and the vast majority of these bikes belong to house residents that live about 1km away from Yonge Street and they travel east-west not north-south on Yonge.

Outside of TTC subway entrance on Yonge Street, it would be quite rare to see a bike locked up anywhere else along Yonge Street between 401 to Steeles! Why? Because that stretch of Yonge Street is mostly lined with ethnic stores,... especially Persian, Korean, Chinese, etc,.... those are the largest ethnic demographics in Ward 23, a ward that's full of visible minorities,.... it's very rare to see anyone from these demographic cycling,... whenever you see a cyclist, look at them,... how often are they a visible minority????

The Canada federal building, I see maybe 10-15 out front and another 5 in rear,... NorthYorkCivicCentre and library in back of NorthYorkCityCentre have about 50 bike off Beecroft in the rear,.... likely evenly split between those using those facilities and the other half walking through NorthYorkCityCentre to subway.

Biggest area cycling hub is EarlHaigSecondarySchool with about 150-200 bikes locked up during school,.. but it's school district boundary is Yonge Street, so why would those high school students be riding on Yonge Street????

The city have recently conducted cycling count in Ward 23 arteries including Yonge Street,... but those numbers have not been made public yet. which shows this area has a strong east-west cycling travel (house residents going to subway station),... but relatively low north-south Yonge Street cycling travel.


So if we followed your logic, by judging the volume of cars on Yonge, another car lane is justified. But this is not the direction I want my neighborhood to go!

My logic???,... you`re assuming too much,... and we now what *assume* means,...

But let's go with that,... put it this way, stand anywhere on Yonge Street in North York Centre and count cyclist during rush hour,... you might get 10-20 per hour in each direction. But if the city, by narrowing vehicular traffic lane width and eliminating tree lined centre median & left turn lanes manage to produce the 1.5m bike lanes for each direction (BTW, they're aiming for protected bike lanes so it's closer to 1.8-2m per direction),... You'll have a total of 3-4m width of cycling infrastructure on Yonge Street,.... that's more than the 3.0m minimum road width,... since you mentioned it: it'll be better to put in another Yonge Street vehicular traffic lane (southbound or even bidirectional like what they had on Jarvis) that can handle about 1,000 cars per hour in rush hour,... and service about 1,500 people in cars in rush hour - assuming an average of 1.5 people per car,.... Thus, you're really looking at providing cycling infrastructure service to a low number of cyclist mainly from outside the area that are measured in the tens/hr or providing vehicular road traffic service to a high number of road users that are measured in the thousands/hr,.... in an area that has some of the worst traffic gridlock congestion in North America.



PipolChap, do you actually want your neighbourhood to get rid of the tree lined centre median on Yonge Street? Personally, I'd much rather see the tree lined centre median extended south to Highway 401 and north to the Finch Hydro Corridor & Steeles and beyond,...


PipolChap, since you live and cycle in North York Centre,.... I'm betting you don't live in the condo (mainly within Doris & Beecroft ring roads), since most area cyclist actually live in the houses east of Doris and West of Beecroft.

Why does the approximately 62,000 condo residents in North York Centre NOT cycle? Because they pay a premium to live along Yonge Corridor,... so that basically everything they need (TTC subway station, multiple grocery stores, bank branches, government offices-services, mutliple restaurants, drink places, shopping store, options, etc,..) are all within a 5-10 minute walk,... that's under 1km walk. The sweetspot for cycling is about 1-5km,... if you live at Yonge-Sheppard you might cycle 4km to CanadianTire or Ikea near Sheppard&Leslie,... but you're not likely to cycle 6km to FairviewMall - too far.

City rules specifies that condo developer must provide 1 bike parking space for every 10 condo units; with 2.5 residents per condo unit, that means a maximum of 1 bike for every 25 condo residents. But guess what? At most condo towers, less than half of bike parking spaces are being used (I could show photos of rows and rows of empty bike parking spaces both indoor and out in North York Centre),... so that means 1 bike for every 50-100 condo residents!

I'm not even going to get started on how the new city of Toronto allowed about 60 new condo towers in North York Centre in the last 17 years since amalgamation but the area only got 1 new office tower and now a handful of office condos (1 floor at EmeraldPark, 12 floors at HullmarkCentre plus 3 on podium which are about 20% full),.... North York Centre is a vertical sleeping community! And last year, the area lost over 500 jobs,... so where does the people who live in North York Centre work? Mostly out of North York Centre, mainly downtown,... way too far for commuter cycling!

So it`s not like if you take out rush hour traffic lanes (which you`ll do if you convert parking lanes to bike lanes since those parking lanes currently become rush hour traffic lanes), you`ll convert all those 1,500 people who use it in each direction to cyclists,... you might get another 4.5-6 more cyclist since only 0.3-0.4% of area residents are commuter cyclists.... rest will find other driving routes or take transit,... Yonge subway is already operating beyond capacity going southbound in AM peak time so,.. good luck trying to get on southbound subway in midtown.


Let's make it clear,... I'm not against building cycling infrastructure,.... I'm just in favour of building more useful infrastructure that will benefit more people! The Finch Hydro Corridor is already a Multi-Use Trail for cyclist, roller-bladers, joggers, hikers, walkers, everybody! Extend that multi-use trail south through North York Centre! Currrently Finch Hydro Corridor multi-use trail gaps at Yonge but goes through HendonPark where Beecroft Rd currently ends,... so extend the multi-use trail down west side of Beecroft Rd which has a lengthy long strip of grassy boulevard sidewalk that doesn't service any houses but is primarily used like a multi-use trail anyways since that's the outer part of ring road where residential streets of houses to west doesn't intersect at Beecroft Rd. At Churchill/Church Ave where Beecroft Rd and Doris Ave are closest, the multi-use trail will be on run along south side (Section 37 from future development) and make it's way along east side of Doris where once again we find primarily lengthy long strip of grassy boulevard sidewalk that doesn't service any houses but is primarily used like a multi-use trail anyways since that's the outer part of ring road where residential streets of houses to east doesn't intersect at Doris Ave,.... with future Doris Ave extension south of Sheppard into Avondale Condominium Community the multi-use trail will literally be in the backyard of the vast majority of condo residents in North York Centre,.... and it'll run near about 6-8 area schools,...


Anyways,.... area councillor should have a community meeting on local cycling infrastructure around late October to mid November,... show up and make yourself heard,...
 
Sunnyray, I don't know about everyone, but I'm sure there are other members like me who when we see a post that length, we skip it.

If you want more people to read what you're writing, write posts that are closer in length to what other people write.
 
With protected bike lanes on Yonge Street, the area gridlock traffic congestion will continue to get worst at a faster rate,... while riding on these protected bike lanes on Yonge Street, you'll be huffing and puffing exhaust fumes!

So sharing more of our roads with clean forms of transportation is actually going to increase hazardous air pollutants and greenhouse gases? Creative argument but, with respect, it sounds like a lot of hot air.

The cycling infrastructure is ridiculously underdeveloped in North York Centre. I don't think its a fair answer to tell cyclists that they should have to travel kilometres out of their way and into the winding ravine trail network in order to get downtown. Car drivers should share the direct north-south roads with others.

The fact that North York Centre can, at times, feel like a "a vertical sleeping community" (which, by the way, I don't entirely agree with), is a symptom of the car-based culture you're promoting, and not simply a cause of it.
 
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Sunnyray, first of all, thanks for the detailed response. I'm not saying you are pro-car or pro-bike, I really don't like your argument that there are not enough cyclist to build bike lanes. I simply believe we should try to benefit everyone and give people the CHOICE of walking, using cars or using bikes.

Why does the approximately 62,000 condo residents in North York Centre NOT cycle?
Because there is no place to cycle! NYCC has been planned around the car.

Biggest area cycling hub is EarlHaigSecondarySchool with about 150-200 bikes locked up during school,.. but it's school district boundary is Yonge Street, so why would those high school students be riding on Yonge Street????
Why wouldn't they want to? Do students leave their houses only for school? Perhaps they want to go to the library, swim, shop, eat, drink bubble tea, etc... before/after school and on weekends!

it's very rare to see anyone from these demographic cycling,... whenever you see a cyclist, look at them,... how often are they a visible minority????
Quite alot, but mostly on sidewalks! It really annoys me but I understand their fear on the roads in the area.

So this is what I envision in a nutshell. Remove the median and trees, which I think is useless for the people in the area because they only provide shade for cars. Narrow the car lanes WITH PARKING similar to Yonge, near or south of Lawrence. The narrower lanes would solve the safe jaywalking that the medians provided. As for the trees (I know you like the trees and so do I), I propose planting trees between sidewalks and the proposed bike lanes off to each side. They would better serve both cyclist and pedestrians in terms of shade. Voila! :)

So the question is: Is there enough space for this?

I'm also for bike lanes along Beecroft/Doris, Sheppard, Finch, Parkhome... um... let's just say everywhere. The choice has to be there for people, otherwise the car will always be the only option.

As for community meeting, I do try to attend but they are not always during convenient times. If I can't go, I try to send Filion's office an email/letter regarding the issue.
 
Because there is no place to cycle! NYCC has been planned around the car.

I would agree that the area is not "friendly" to bikes, and that it is barely friendly to pedestrians. I'd love to get the bikes off the sidewalks and onto the streets where they belong. Many times we've been grazed by speeding cyclists on the sidewalks, who seem to regard pedestrians as either invisible or as undesirables on "their" turf. They are quickly rising to the level of smokers on my list of people who ruin a pleasant stroll.
 
So sharing more of our roads with clean forms of transportation is actually going to increase hazardous air pollutants and greenhouse gases? Creative argument but, with respect, it sounds like a lot of hot air.

Most of the posters on urbantoronto.ca are here because Toronto is a growing big city,... but each of the tall condo-office towers that so many of them crave,.... brings in thousands of new people into a neighbourhood,.... now multiply that by the 3-4 condo towers that open each year in North York Centre and then multiply that by X numbers of years going forwards,... the city is now trying to plan for 30-40 years out with North Yonge Study,.... not all of the people will be cyclist, not all will be transit users,... many will be drivers,... as is there choice like anyone's elese,... after all, the city generally requires developer to build about one car parking space per condo unit,....

And in an area like North York Centre, along Yonge corridor between Doris & Beecroft from Highway 401 to Steeles, where population density will easily double or triple what they are now,... you can bet we'll see double or triple of the number of cars on the road - hard to imagine especially since we already have some of the worst traffic congestion in North America,.... now, if you want to pull out whatever pollution fighting trees are on Yonge Street to put in protected bike lanes,... those cyclists will be huffing and puffing through exhaust smoke as they cycle.


The cycling infrastructure is ridiculously underdeveloped in North York Centre. I don't think its a fair answer to tell cyclists that they should have to travel kilometres out of their way and into the winding ravine trail network in order to get downtown. Car drivers should share the direct north-south roads with others.

I quite agree,... cycling infrastructure in North York is ridiculously underdeveloped,... compared to downtown Toronto. And cycling infrastructure in downtown Toronto is ridiculously overdeveloped - compared to North York!

Look, cycling infrastructure budget for the entire city of Toronto is about $9 million per year. Divide that by the 44 wards, and the average ward contribute about $200,000 per year for that budget,.... but ward 23 has 50% more people than average, so really contributing about $300,000 but ward 23 also has higher market value real estate and since the city's main revenue source is property tax revenue,.... Ward 23 is actually contributing closer to $400,000. Toronto's cycling infrastructure dept have been in existance for about 10 years,... so Ward 23 have contributed $4 million to their budget over the last 10 years,.... what cycling infrastructures have Ward 23 gotten in return - nothing!! As most other "suburban" wards.

Where does all that cycling infrastructure money get spent? Mostly downtown in the old city of Toronto,.... thus, the "suburban" wards are subsidizing cycling infrastructure for downtown Toronto. Why???? Who advocates for cycling infrastructure in Toronto?,.. Cycle Toronto,... and the vast majority of their paying memberships are downtown, west end, east end and midtown - in the old city of Toronto and that's where cycling infrastructure money get spent.

Solution,... yeah, I'm funny like that, I'm one of those people who'll come up with solutions,.... have the city cycling infrastructure budget split into the 4 community councils of North York, Scarborough, Etobicoke and Toronto/EastYork; each getting about $2-3 million based on tax revenue contribution,... and thus, even though your ward doesn't get any new cycling infrastructure this year, you'll at least know that it's going to a neighbouring ward where you're still likely to use that cycling infrastructure! VS more cycling infrastructure downtown where you (and other suburban taxpayers) will have to ride all the way to the other side of the city to use it!!!


The fact that North York Centre can, at times, feel like a "a vertical sleeping community" (which, by the way, I don't entirely agree with), is a symptom of the car-based culture you're promoting, and not simply a cause of it.

I'm not promoting a car-based culture,... if you knew who I am and the type of advocacy I do for my community, you'd be eating those words of yours off the ground.

I often refer to North York Centre (Yonge corridor between Doris & Beecroft from Highway 401 to Finch Hydro Corridor) as "a vertical sleeping community" because since amalgamation there's been about 60 new residential condo towers and only 1 full office tower built in this area,.... the end result is there's a lot more people than jobs in this area and thus in the morning rush hour, there's a lot more people leaving this area than coming into it - that is the definition of a sleeping community,... and since North York Centre is primarily vertical community,... it's "a vertical sleeping community"!
 
Sunnyray, first of all, thanks for the detailed response. I'm not saying you are pro-car or pro-bike, I really don't like your argument that there are not enough cyclist to build bike lanes. I simply believe we should try to benefit everyone and give people the CHOICE of walking, using cars or using bikes.

I walk, I TTC, I drive, I bike,... not neccessarily in that order,...

I'm for getting this city moving, moving as many people as possible around efficiently.

On College Street, it makes since to put in bike lanes because there's more cyclist than drivers and their passengers in each lane!!!


Because there is no place to cycle! NYCC has been planned around the car.

Actually, that's wrong,.... NYCC has been planned around the car and pedestrians! About 20 years ago, the city of North York did streetscape design for NYCC and decided on 20 feet wide boulevard pedestrian tree-lined sidewalks,... with tree lined centre median from Highway 401 to Finch,... at the community meetings, there were cycling advocates asking for on-road bike lanes but the community voted for tree lined boulevard sidewalks and tree lined centre median.

As for there's no place to cycle in NYCC,.... there's the Finch Hydro Corridor Multi-Use Trail - the city wants a primary east-west route and another north-south route,.... Finch Hydro Corridor Multi-Use Trail is the east west route - it opened in Fall of 2012 west of Yonge/HendonPark to west of York University and beyond,.... and Fall of 2014 from Willowdale to DonValleyTrail - new bridge over Highway 404 coming soon,...

A few weeks ago on an August Saturday afternoon,.... I found myself a nice little spot on the Finch Hydro Corridor Multi-Use Trail,... and counted as I did last summer,... there was about 20-25 people per hour,... on a nice Saturday afternoon,.... mostly cyclist, some joggers, rollerblader,,... a few walkers,... so I ask again, why don't people in NYCC cycle???


BTW, the city cycling infrastructure didn't pay for Finch Hydro Corridor Trail,... the Feds did - it was part of the 2008 economy tanking - infrastructure stimulus funding feds money!


Why wouldn't they want to? Do students leave their houses only for school? Perhaps they want to go to the library, swim, shop, eat, drink bubble tea, etc... before/after school and on weekends!

City doesn't plan cycling routes based on "why wouldn't they?" or "Perhaps they want to go to",.... ideally, look for strong existing cycling patterns and try to make those routes safer by building proper cycling infrastructure for them.

The 150-200 Earl Haig students who cycle to school don't ride up and down Yonge Street (school district border), they go primarily east-west along Empress east of the school (not towards Yonge) also north-south of Kenneth & Willowdale Ave


Quite alot, but mostly on sidewalks! It really annoys me but I understand their fear on the roads in the area.

Try attending a cycling advocacy meeting, event, rally or ride,.... not many visible minorities at all,.... Here look at the Cycle Toronto team,....
https://www.cycleto.ca/our-team

So this is what I envision in a nutshell. Remove the median and trees, which I think is useless for the people in the area because they only provide shade for cars. Narrow the car lanes WITH PARKING similar to Yonge, near or south of Lawrence. The narrower lanes would solve the safe jaywalking that the medians provided. As for the trees (I know you like the trees and so do I), I propose planting trees between sidewalks and the proposed bike lanes off to each side. They would better serve both cyclist and pedestrians in terms of shade. Voila! :)

So the question is: Is there enough space for this?

Trees don't just provide shade,.... condo towers does that! Trees clean the air by converting carbon-dioxide to Oxygen and provide calming green environment. Another thing to keep in mind is those healthy trees in the tree lined centre median are medium size trees that have about 50 times the number of oxygen producing leaves than those pencil size trees on the side of the sidewalk!!!

The main problem of using trees as buffer for bike lanes are the idiot cyclist who uses trees as to lock their bikes and thus destry tree barks and kill the tree - it cost the city about $300 to replace each of those skinny pencil trees.

Generally, to put in just on-road bike lanes without buffer protection, there should generally be enough room as long as traffic lanes are narrowed to minimal (problem is bus and heavy truck need wider lanes) and tree lined centre median might need just shaving done.... but with criteria of not negatively affecting traffic congestion (capacity) and parking,... it's more techincally difficult to put in any protected bike lanes,... and the criteria is to put in "safe bike lanes",.... you're actually asking for double buffer protection on either side of bike lane,.. tree lined buffer from cars and tree lined buffer from pedestrian,... trees need a certain amount of ground space to expand - grow and draw in water,... on the road side, they'll definitely need a cement buffer from road salt,.... so this would be too much.

What the city is examining now - removing tree lined centre median and limiting left turn lanes,... is already technically challenging enough and creating more technical problems than the northbound Doris & southbound Beecroft bike lanes proposal which got cancelled.

Another issue with putting bike lanes on Yonge Street is that it could become a liability issue for the city,.... think about it, bike lanes on Yonge in NYCC that leads to 401,... highway interchange are death traps for cyclist and this one also leads to bottom of valley at Yonge & YorkMills-Wilson where cyclist will have a hard time riding uphill. There are some solutions but they also require MTO help but they`re not very helpfull whenever it comes to *city issues*.


I'm also for bike lanes along Beecroft/Doris, Sheppard, Finch, Parkhome... um... let's just say everywhere. The choice has to be there for people, otherwise the car will always be the only option.

As for community meeting, I do try to attend but they are not always during convenient times. If I can't go, I try to send Filion's office an email/letter regarding the issue.

You should go, there's not many local cyclist anyways,.... they're always in the evening,... If you as a local cyclist don`t make yourself heard,... outside special interest groups definitely will,... and any cycling infrastructure built in your area will favour them and not you.
 
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There are many things to respond to here, but I for one never approve of tree removal. Unless diseased or plans to replace are taken. But it is not the same thing to remove a tree with years of growth and stick in a sapling that might not make it through the season.

Trees are especially important in urban centre, for the air, the shade but more importantly the atmosphere. They make people happier and healthier.
 

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