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Tibetan Suppression by China

Hydrogen

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Looks like the Chinese government is so concerned about Tibetan protests making it look bad right before the Olympic circus that it finds it necessary to carry out some larger-scale killing.

Yeah, talk about an Olympic spirit.
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Photo evidence of Tibet horror comes to light
GEOFFREY YORK
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
March 18, 2008 at 10:23 PM EDT

BEIJING — Gruesome new photos showing Tibetans shot to death in Western China have provided fresh evidence of a Chinese crackdown on Tibetan protesters as the Dalai Lama threatens to resign if the violence spirals out of control.

The photos (many of them too graphic to publish) appear to show bullet holes in the blood-stained corpses of several Tibetans in China's Sichuan province. They are the first hard evidence that Tibetans were shot to death during the Chinese security crackdown in recent days.

Nearly 100 Tibetans have been killed in the crackdown, including 19 yesterday, and hundreds more have been arrested, according to Tibetan activist groups. China says 16 people were killed by Tibetan rioters in Lhasa last week, and it alleges that the Dalai Lama has "masterminded" the violence.

Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao took a hard-line stand on the conflict yesterday, accusing the "Dalai clique" of inciting the violence in a plot to "undermine" the Beijing Olympics this summer.

The Dalai Lama called for peace by both sides. "If things become out of control, then my only option is to completely resign," he told a news conference yesterday at the headquarters of his exiled government in northern India.

A spokesman said the Dalai Lama was referring to his political role as head of the exiled government, not his religious role as the Tibetan spiritual leader. "As a monk, he cannot compromise on non-violence," said Thubten Samphel, secretary for information and international relations at the Tibetan government-in-exile.

"If the mainstream Tibetan movement resorts to violence as a means to resolve issues, he will step down from the political leadership of the Tibetan people," the spokesman said in a telephone interview from India.

In Sichuan province, which borders Tibet, up to 20 Tibetans were killed by security agents who opened fire on protesters this week, according to Tibetan activist groups. They provided the names of nine dead protesters, along with other personal details of most of them.

The grisly photos showed the naked or semi-naked corpses of Tibetans covered in blood, with severe wounds visible. Most seemed to have bullet holes in their heads, arms or chests. They were available on the website of the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy, but their authenticity could not be confirmed.

"The important thing about these photos is that they clearly show people who were shot," said Robert Barnett, a Tibet expert at Columbia University in New York.

He noted that China has never alleged the Tibetans have used guns, and there have been no independent reports of guns among the Tibetans, so the bullet wounds could only have come from the Chinese side.

"This does look like the first concrete evidence of security forces killing demonstrators," Mr. Barnett said in an interview. "It seems to show that the Chinese authorities opened fire with an intent to kill. It's the first time that we've seen the Tibetans documenting what is happening and giving us an accurate picture of what's happening."

Protests continued to erupt in Tibetan regions of Western China yesterday, and even on the outskirts of Lhasa. The exiled government said 19 Tibetan protesters were killed by security forces in Gansu province yesterday.

Another report said nearly 1,000 Tibetans have been arrested in house-to-house sweeps by security agents in Lhasa, where thousands of military and paramilitary troops have occupied the Tibetan capital.

Journalists have been barred from entering any of the Tibetan regions, despite Chinese promises to allow free movement of journalists in this Olympic year.

Comments by the Dalai Lama yesterday could be a "major signal" of his willingness to resume negotiations with the Chinese government, despite the intense emotions of the past several days, Mr. Barnett said. "I think it's pretty important. The Dalai Lama is signalling that he's leaving the door open to negotiations."

Mr. Wen's comments, however, seemed to leave little hope for compromise, Mr. Barnett said. "The Chinese seem to be moving to a very hard-line position," Mr. Barnett said.

The Dalai Lama ridiculed China's allegation that he had "masterminded" the violent protests in Lhasa last week. In fact, China might have used secret agents to instigate the violence to discredit him, he said. "It's possible some Chinese agents are involved there. Sometimes totalitarian regimes are very clever, so it is important to investigate." But he also added: "We must build good relations with the Chinese. We should not develop anti-Chinese feelings. We must live together side by side."

The Dalai Lama's representatives have held annual talks with mid-level Chinese officials since 2002, but no significant progress has been made. Many younger Tibetans in the exile community have complained that the Dalai Lama's moderate policy — the so-called "Middle Way" — has failed to achieve any results, and they argue for a more aggressive push for an independent Tibet.
 

冉国颖

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Boycott the 2008 Beijing Olympics!

Stop the autarchy,as all Chinese hope!
 

billonlogan

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I'm surprised Miller and Co. are still going ahead with this trip. This is no controversy, this is cold blooded murder by a repressive regime. Going there just ignores what is going on in Tibet and surrounding provinces. Shame on him to belittle what is going on.

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Controversy won't delay China mission: Miller
March 21, 2008
John Spears
CITY HALL BUREAU

Toronto's mission to China next month will open the way for Canadians to discuss human rights issues with the Chinese, Mayor David Miller says.

The comment followed questions yesterday about the timing of the city's mission to China, scheduled for April 13 to 20, in the context of violent protests in Tibet against Chinese rule.

Five city officials, including Miller, will accompany 10 business and academic leaders on the trip to Toronto's sister city of Chongqing as well as Beijing and Shanghai. Miller noted Professor Bernie Frolic of York University will be lecturing on human rights at Chinese universities during the trip.

"It's very significant work, and this kind of mission allows that opportunity," Miller said.

Councillors Michael Walker (Ward 22, St. Paul's) and Cesar Palacio (Ward 17, Davenport) have filed a motion asking city council to condemn China's "gross violations" of the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights, and asking the federal government to consider boycotting the Beijing Olympics if repression continues in Tibet. It also calls for a trade ban against countries who violate the human rights declaration.

The motion doesn't ask Miller to cancel his trip because council won't meet again until after he returns.

Miller said promoting trade and the fight against climate change are other purposes of the trip.

"If we're going to address climate change, we need very much to do work in China," he said.
 

cruzin4u

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Miller is a douchebag, that's why he's going.

I still don't understand how the Olympics can be held in a Communist Country.
 

theowne

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I'm not the greatest at politics, but China and India are the two fastest growing major economies, commonly said to be potential superpowers in the future. While India is a democracy, China is a communist country. Could China be involved in some sort of future Cold War resurgence with the US?
 

Hydrogen

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China is not communist (or communist-wannabe as in the past under Mao). It is aspiring to state capitalism and is an oligarchy.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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billonlogan:

I'm surprised Miller and Co. are still going ahead with this trip. This is no controversy, this is cold blooded murder by a repressive regime. Going there just ignores what is going on in Tibet and surrounding provinces. Shame on him to belittle what is going on.

Not to justify the action by China, but how many Chinese made items have you used today, knowingly or unknowingly? Those who live in glass houses...

Somehow, I have a feeling that it's easier to criticize someone because it's David Miller.

Quite frankly, I think whatever "face" the Chinese government wanted from the games, it's been effectively neutered by the mess in Tibet. They thought they could play the propaganda game and win, but clearly they didn't now. Serves them right.

AoD
 

lordmandeep

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China is a communist country???

It is more of a socialists fascism and is more capitalist...

Also people who think we can just ignore China and not exist without it are being very very idealistic...
 

Mustapha

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Shooting young people. How cruel can this regime get?

Tienanmen wasn't that long ago. This is a government that massacres its own citizens.
 

Admiral Beez

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I'm surprised Miller and Co. are still going ahead with this trip. This is no controversy, this is cold blooded murder by a repressive regime. Going there just ignores what is going on in Tibet and surrounding provinces. Shame on him to belittle what is going on.
It's rather hypocritical for us to criticize the Mayor while we continue to buy Chinese-made goods every day. Remember, every time you buy a Chinese made toy, computer, shoe, pen, calculator or anything else, a portion of that money goes to the Chinese government and military. The condos Torontonians buy from Li Ka-shing and other developers based in China fund the very bullets and batons China uses against the people of Tibet.

The Mayor is going to China because the people of Toronto and Canada support China. Meanwhile, Toronto-based firms covet the China market for their export sales. If China wasn't the supplier and customer of choice to most Torontonians, he likely wouldn't go there.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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From the Globe:

Monks disrupt Tibet media tour
Beijing-managed visit by journalists backfires
CHARLES HUTZLER

Associated Press

March 27, 2008 at 6:36 AM EDT

LHASA — A government-managed visit by foreign reporters to Tibet's capital backfired Thursday when Buddhist monks disrupted the tour, screaming there was no religious freedom and that the Dalai Lama was not to blame for Lhasa's recent violence.

The government had arranged the trip for the reporters to show how calm Lhasa was after the deadly riots shattered China's plans for a peaceful run-up to the Beijing Summer Olympics.

The outburst by a group of 30 monks came as the journalists, including an Associated Press reporter, were being shown around the Jokhang Temple — one of Tibet's holiest shrines — by government handlers in Lhasa.

“Tibet is not free! Tibet is not free!” yelled one young Buddhist monk, who then started to cry.

They also said their exiled spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, had nothing to do with recent anti-government riots by Tibetans in Lhasa, where buildings were torched and looted, and ethnic Han Chinese were attacked.

The government has said the March 14 riots were masterminded by “the Dalai clique,” Beijing's term for the Dalai Lama and his supporters.

Government handlers shouted for the journalists to leave and tried to pull them away during the protest.

“They want us to crush the Dalai Lama and that is not right,” one monk said during the 15-minute outburst.

“This had nothing to do with the Dalai Lama,” said another, referring to the March 14 riots. The Chinese government says 22 people died, while Tibetan exiles say the violence plus a harsh crackdown afterward have left nearly 140 people dead.

The outburst by the monks came amid a morning of stage-managed events. Reporters had already been taken to a Tibet medical clinic that had been attacked nearby the Jokhang, and shown a clothing store where five girls had been trapped and burned to death.

The monks, who first spoke Tibetan and then switched to Mandarin so the reporters could understand them, said they knew they would probably be arrested for their actions but were willing to accept that.

They had rushed over to stop the reporters from being taken into an inner sanctum of the temple, saying they were upset that a government administrator was telling the reporters that Tibet had been part of China for centuries.

They said troops who had been guarding the temple since March 14 were removed the night before the visit by the reporters.

One monk said they were upset that some people brought to the temple for the visit by the journalists “are not true believers but are Communist Party members.”

“They are all officials, they (the government) arranged for them to come in. And we aren't allowed to go out because they say we could destroy things but we never did anything,” another monk said.

China rarely allows foreign reporters into Tibet under normal circumstances, so the media tour was meant to underscore the communist leadership's determination to contain any damage ahead of the Beijing Olympics in August that was supposed to celebrate China as a modern, rising power.

Foreign Ministry Spokesman Qin Gang told a news conference Thursday that he had no specific information on the latest protest.

“I would like to stress that including the monks the people of various ethnic groups in Tibet are resolutely safeguarding the national unity and oppose separatist activities,” he said.

"Tibet is developing. The monks and other ethnic people in Tibet enjoy their lawful rights and freedoms, they can enjoy their lives. Tibet today is not like medieval Europe," Mr. Qin said.

Meanwhile, the Dalai Lama, speaking in New Delhi, said he was in touch with "friends" to get a dialogue going with Chinese officials.

Later, the area around Jokhang was sealed off by People's Armed Police wearing helmets and carrying shields. They refused to say why they were there. The only people allowed to enter the area were those who live in the narrow lanes around the temple.

Most of the shops near the temple were also closed.

The reporters were kept away from any potential hot spots, including the Ramoche monastery. Down a lane north of the Jokhang, Ramoche is where the violence started on March 14.

The narrow lanes leading to it were sealed off by riot police in dark blue uniforms.

The government handlers also told the reporters they would not be able to see Drepung and Sera monasteries, where initial protests were launched March 10.

The reporters were taken to places that had been well publicized on state television as places the rioters had attacked.

That included the Lhasa No. 2 Middle School near Ramoche, where protesters had hurled burning objects that set fire to one two-story building. Nobody was hurt at the school.

The principal, Deji Zhuoge, said he did not know why the school was attacked. He said 85 per cent of the schools 620 students were Tibetan. “We don't know what happened it was very chaotic that morning,” he said.

The official Xinhua News Agency reported Thursday on the action by the monks, but did not say what the monks yelled out. “The media tour soon resumed,” Xinhua said.

The rioting and four days of protests that preceded it were the worst anti-Chinese demonstrations in Lhasa in nearly two decades and they sparked protests in Tibetan areas across a vast portion of western China.

The Chinese government has maintained its response was measured and comparable to what any responsible government would do when faced with civil unrest.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080327.wtibet0327/BNStory/International/home
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I am really surprised by how "incompetent" the Chinese spin doctors are this time around. It's almost funny to see it blow up in their face yet again - if not for the chilling afterthought as to what will happen to those monks.

The Chinese government has maintained its response was measured and comparable to what any responsible government would do when faced with civil unrest.

Perhaps, but said responsible governments are not likely to script visits by journalists like that.

Wait, I take that back, considering the trends towards "embedded journalism".

AoD
 

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