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Rob Ford's Toronto

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I've driven by his place a few times when he was supposedly visiting constits and he was at home each time lol.

See and I don't see how that's so hard for a member of the media to simply set up a camera outside his place and file the report about his constituency meetings with the 'lade in the background at home.

Then the "mr ford had no comment" will show us why.
 
Can anyone here point me to a fairly succinct (and fair, balanced) text on the current transit debate? I'm particularly interested in the idea of the downtown relief line vs Scarborough. Thanks.

Scarborough is LRT vs Subway. LRT has more stops and does a better job of serving walk-up riders and that drives density. It's also much cheaper so you can spend the spare cash on LRT in other locations. Doesn't disrupt traffic but transfer to subway is annoying. Will lose SRT for duration of construction.

Subway is less stops further apart which is good for people coming in on bus transfers. No transfer to Line 2 so more convenient. Less incentive for density at street level. Much more expensive so less cash to spend elsewhere. Massive road disruption during construction.

Both options will increase ridership and that puts stress on the already-at-capacity Yonge Line. DRL solves that by diverting inner suburb traffic on Line 2 away from the St. George and Yonge stations. Also brings subway to downtown neighbourhoods that are getting denser. Still in the planning stages and looks like only east end will get done at first. Tunnelling and transfers to line 1 downtown will be very very expensive and disruptive to install. However something will need to be done eventually.

Scarb LRT/subway and DRL are important but resources are limited. Either Scarborough solution is cheaper, faster to implement and in an area with more voters. Even though Scarborough transit users would be better served by the DRL, politics make a Line 2 extension an easier sell.
 
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See and I don't see how that's so hard for a member of the media to simply set up a camera outside his place and file the report about his constituency meetings with the 'lade in the background at home.

Then the "mr ford had no comment" will show us why.

Unfortunately, the Escalade in the driveway isn't a smoking gun. Can be too easily dismissed by just claiming he left it at home while using another vehicle or was riding along with someone else.

It will also make the media look like they're stalking him, something they're already being unfairly heavily criticized for.
 
Both options will increase ridership and that puts stress on the already-at-capacity Yonge Line. DRL solves that by diverting inner suburb traffic on Line 2 away from the St. George and Yonge stations. Also brings subway to downtown neighbourhoods that are getting denser. Still in the planning stages and looks like only east end will get done at first. Tunnelling and transfers to line 1 downtown will be very very expensive and disruptive to install. However something will need to be done eventually.

It should also be noted that the DRL (well, a line that follows the proposed path) has been on the books in some way or another for about 60 years now. It's need has been highly recognized by numerous transit experts. There was a major study in 1985 that declared its need but that was ignored in the 1990s to buy votes with the Sheppard Stubway.

There are a few sites worth checking out with decent information:

http://drlnow.ca (a site that's been pushing for it since 2008)
http://transit.toronto.on.ca/ (they also have fabulous archives if you ever want to go exploring into the past of the TTC)
 
See and I don't see how that's so hard for a member of the media to simply set up a camera outside his place and file the report about his constituency meetings with the 'lade in the background at home.

Then the "mr ford had no comment" will show us why.

Making calls from home?
 
Have to disagree with you. I think what she's really done here is a good job of subtly reinforcing many of Fordite assumptions and talking points under the guise of sounding more "serious" than usual. I actually think people are supposed to be distracted by the "oh wow, Sue Ann Levy actually wrote a non-ridiculous column" factor and not pick up on the bait and switch. For instance, her entire "fighting congestion" point is about making life easier for drivers, of course, not about transit. Or how about "going head to head with the city's unions"? The whole thing is typical combative anti-public sector rhetoric, they're all a bunch of trough feeders and cheats."$710 million bill left by David Miller." On and on.

not all parts of it, though

take this for example:that's utter bullshit

Eglinton Connects has been public-consultation-ed within an inch of its life

if it's a surprise to anyone, then those anyones haven't been paying attention at all

I said, "sounds rational", not that she was rational, and no, I don't disagree with your respective points. It's my fault for posting something properly in the wee hours. In a nut shell, the Fordites have transparently changed styles, and "platform" points. The resent presser at Etob. headquarters, and this article are examples.

It's interesting that the social media push is still using the tired methods, and talking about tired points like passing the buck on the Gardiner. 500 mil to "fix", as in band aid the problem, avoids the problem, and pushes it the problem to the next council, and use it as an election point.
 
He's yelling about raccoons now. Apparently, according to Ford, they're one of the biggest problems facing the city.

Literally, five minutes on raccoons.
 
Scarborough is LRT vs Subway. LRT has more stops and does a better job of serving walk-up riders and that drives density. It's also much cheaper so you can spend the spare cash on LRT in other locations. Doesn't disrupt traffic but transfer to subway is annoying. Will lose SRT for duration of construction.

Subway is less stops further apart which is good for people coming in on bus transfers. No transfer to Line 2 so more convenient. Less incentive for density at street level. Much more expensive so less cash to spend elsewhere. Massive road disruption during construction.

Both options will increase ridership and that puts stress on the already-at-capacity Yonge Line. DRL solves that by diverting inner suburb traffic on Line 2 away from the St. George and Yonge stations. Also brings subway to downtown neighbourhoods that are getting denser. Still in the planning stages and looks like only east end will get done at first. Tunnelling and transfers to line 1 downtown will be very very expensive and disruptive to install. However something will need to be done eventually.

Scarb LRT/subway and DRL are important but resources are limited. Either Scarborough solution is cheaper, faster to implement and in an area with more voters. Even though Scarborough transit users would be better served by the DRL, politics make a Line 2 extension an easier sell.

Got a question...How is the DRL as proposed be better at serving Scarborough tansit users? The proposed line goes nowhere near Scarborough it could be just as easily called the North York Relief Line or Don Valley West Relief....Scarberians would still be required to transfer and not only that they would be forced I say forced into using the above ground portion of the Eg/Crosstown to access the DRL....and if that is the case why the effort into a B-D Extension why not a seamless connection between a Scarborough LRT and Eg/Crosstown?
 
-SAL has a huge hate on for keesmat, for reasons i don't entirely understand.
SAL represents the "no development" part of the population, especially in the Eglinton W. corridor from Bathurst to Dufferin, which consequentialy is she lives; IMHO, SAL is a New Forrest resident who feels inferior to and/or wants to be a Forrest Hill resident.
 
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