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Roads: Ontario/GTA Highways Discussion

"Do you know how fast you were going?"
"123."
"And why were you going that fast?"
"Because I didn't think you'd stop me until 125."
When I lived in Fredericton in 2004-2007 the speed limit was 110 kph. So you’d do about 120 kph until you saw the one RCMP car on duty that day, and then without fear you could cruise at 130 kph or so. But only during clear visibility and dry road, or the moose will get you.
 
Something I've noticed with York Region roads on the opposite side of the intersection with highway off ramps will reduce from two lanes to one lane. I understand why they don't have left turn signals, as that would increase the number of separate signal phases and reduce traffic flow of the main directions, but why only one right turn lane? Some of them already have no right turn on red, so the short dedicated phase should work for both lanes. Others don't have a signal phase, so those probably are one lane to prevent turning into centre lane.

Is this a York Region thing or are there other examples of this configuration and good reason for it?

Some examples I've seen include:
Major Mackenzie Drive West and Highway 427
1714795316908.png


Highway 7 and Highway 400 Northbound
1714795407018.png


Highway 7 and Highway 400 Southbound (this one doesn't have 2 lanes)
1714795485057.png


Bass Pro Mills Drive and Highway 400
1714795716101.png


Highway 7 and Highway 404 (this one doesn't have 2 lanes)
1714795560387.png


Rutherford Road and Highway 400 (this one actually does have a left turn lane)
1714795812148.png
 
One of the problems I find with high speeds (posted or not) is the differentials, particularly where there is significant truck volume. I find this most noticeable in 4-lane sections of Hwy 401. Trucks loose momentum on long grades, other trucks trying - very slowly - to overtake them, which jams up everything. Even in 6-lane areas, this leaves Lane 1 for the higher speed traffic, but the real flyers get jammed up by those only willing to do closer to the limit.

Do European highways have similar truck volumes?

Once tourist season comes, most motor homes and vehicles towing trailers won't be taking advantage of the higher limits.

Maybe if we had better driver training, cars and transports, things would go better. Some people simply don't have either the skills or confidence to be at those speeds.
Maybe once a lot of trucking is automated and electrified, we can just have them be willing to drive 5 kph slower in the right lane and not try to jockey past each other at a few kph differential. Electric trucks have a lot more torque and should struggle with grades a lot less.
 
Something I've noticed with York Region roads on the opposite side of the intersection with highway off ramps will reduce from two lanes to one lane. I understand why they don't have left turn signals, as that would increase the number of separate signal phases and reduce traffic flow of the main directions, but why only one right turn lane? Some of them already have no right turn on red, so the short dedicated phase should work for both lanes. Others don't have a signal phase, so those probably are one lane to prevent turning into centre lane.

Is this a York Region thing or are there other examples of this configuration and good reason for it?

Some examples I've seen include:
Major Mackenzie Drive West and Highway 427
View attachment 561279

Highway 7 and Highway 400 Northbound
View attachment 561280

Highway 7 and Highway 400 Southbound (this one doesn't have 2 lanes)
View attachment 561281

Bass Pro Mills Drive and Highway 400
View attachment 561283

Highway 7 and Highway 404 (this one doesn't have 2 lanes)
View attachment 561282

Rutherford Road and Highway 400 (this one actually does have a left turn lane)
View attachment 561284
The answer I can come up with is to prioritize the turning movement of highway traffic. If there are multiple right turning lanes, traffic is able to easily block the middle lanes and thereby blocking left turns off the highway. One thing in common between all of your examples is that the intersections were with 6 lane roads and with max 2 left turn lanes off the highway. This means that traffic off the highway turns into the 2 leftmost lanes and traffic off the side street is funneled into the rightmost lane.
1714881397912.png



As for the Major Mack/427 example, that's just futureproofing for the future extension to the 413, when there will eventually be a left turning movement there.
 
One thing in common between all of your examples is that the intersections were with 6 lane roads and with max 2 left turn lanes off the highway. This means that traffic off the highway turns into the 2 leftmost lanes and traffic off the side street is funneled into the rightmost lane.
That's for the answer, but that only makes sense for the intersections that allow right turns on red. And even then, it wouldn't be safe for right turning traffic to go when the left turning traffic off the highway have left arrow priority as they might turn into the right lane.

Also, this doesn't apply to the examples where they have no right turn on red as there won't be any conflict points.
1714890203233.png
1714890313733.png
 
To which the answer is "Much Higher". Trucks represent a much higher modal share of goods transportation in Europe compared to NA, where much of the traffic is diverted to Freight trains.
I wasn't answering that, just that trucks are speed limited there
 
That's for the answer, but that only makes sense for the intersections that allow right turns on red. And even then, it wouldn't be safe for right turning traffic to go when the left turning traffic off the highway have left arrow priority as they might turn into the right lane.

Also, this doesn't apply to the examples where they have no right turn on red as there won't be any conflict points.
View attachment 561500
View attachment 561501
Generally, no one likes double right turns from municipal roads. We only really see them from freeway offramps. At the Applewood example, it is a very short weave from the turn to the Hwy 400 on-ramp, so only allowing single turns eliminates potential weave/decision conflicts (if someone turns from the left lane but wants to access the ramp). In short, drivers aren't trusted to make double right turns outside of freeway off-ramps.

Especially considering large trucks (tractor trailers). If one wants to access the 400 NB onramp then it has to turn from the curb lane, but then it's turning path is huge and it's unlikely a second vehicle could turn simultaneously.

The volumes are probably low, and the road upstream is really essentially just overbuilt to provide 2 lanes, possibly for future development.
 
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Thanks for sharing

I wonder why they arent putting shovels in the ground for the 401/HWY 6 bypass around Morriston, such a huge bottle neck there
 
Because Cortellucci, De Gasparis, and Rehmatullah don’t have land in the area?
Ironically, I know Metrus (sorry, "DeGasperis Group") owns a bunch of land down in Hagersville.. Perhaps that's why 6 south is happening so relatively quickly?

Or maybe Empire homes has a bigger pocket in the PCs than we realized? they are running a housing production line in Caledonia right now.. detached, 2-car garage homes for $750k!
 

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