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Post: How do you pronounce 'Toronto'

JWBF

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It is a shame that gladiatorial, err... reality shows are pretty well taking over.

Actually, we watch a good amount of shows from USA, Showtime and of course SyFy.
I'm pissed that Rogers killed Jack.
 

Coruscanti Cognoscente

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It is a shame that gladiatorial, err... reality shows are pretty well taking over.

Actually, we watch a good amount of shows from USA, Showtime and of course SyFy.
I'm pissed that Rogers killed Jack.
You mean Jack FM? Honestly can't say I miss it lol.

Only USA show I watch is Royal Pains.

SyFy? What do they have? They used to have BSG but do they even have science fiction anymore?
 

freshcutgrass

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I'd have thought it was plainly obvious that I was simply joking to radio as a dead medium, referring to the situation the last time it had much relevance in the late 1950s or early 1960s. If it wasn't for people having the radio on when in the car, I doubt that radio would even be functioning any more.
Radio is just another example of quality going down the toilet in favour of convenience. People used to actually shine their shoes in the 50's & 60's too.

There are still some of us who listen to FM on our "hifi's" at home. The reason being, is that fidelity is important, and a good, uncompressed analogue fm signal, played back on a quality audio system (which means a good dedicated FM tuner) is probably the best sounding audio medium. Jazz FM does direct-to-air broadcasts of concerts from their studio, and the fidelity is totally amazing on my audio system (single-ended tubes).

Fidelity doesn't matter in your car...or ipod, because they are poor listening environments, and the playback equipment and compressed signals have crap fidelity anyway. AM has inferior fidelity, which is why it's for "talk radio". Most music is poorly recorded in the studio in the first place, for the very reason it doest have to be. But it's important to maintain quality for those who still appreciate it, and just for the sake of maintaining quality. We don't ALL have to join the race to the bottom you know. Luckily, the CRTC still actually has rules pertaining to bare minimum requirements of audio quality. We're lucky...even the UK is apparently considering getting rid of analog radio signals all together, and going completely digital. That's scary.
 

JWBF

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You mean Jack FM? Honestly can't say I miss it lol.

Only USA show I watch is Royal Pains.

SyFy? What do they have? They used to have BSG but do they even have science fiction anymore?
Alphas, Eureka (last season), Haven, Sanctuary, Warehouse 13, and cheesy movies.

Jack FM Toronto was a breath of fresh air (although not as good as Vancouver) in a sea of top 40 crap IMHO. It's good to hear that Vinyl & Boom offer alternatives.
 

SunriseChampion

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Come to think of it....the only TV I do watch (via streaming it online) are shows that aren't on TV anymore or we don't get here ie An Idiot Abroad (I am going to marry Karl Pilkington), Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Skins, and on...and rarely at that.

Oh, I doooo watch Shameless at a friend's house on the odd Monday...but that's about it...radio? All the time (mostly CIUT and CBC which are commercial-free).....I like my collection of vinyl rekkids as well :p

My generation, I think, is rabidly against the sickening time given to ads in mainstream media. I know I can't stand it. I'd rather pirate things off the internet than pay for cable and then have to sit through people selling me crap and telling me what I need in my life.
 

iT Girl

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A little article for scarberiankhatru!

Link to article

The City
A little happiness in a cup

Compiled by Rob Roberts
National Post

Thursday, May 31, 2007

Q & A

Q How do you pronounce Toronto?

A There is no way we're going to offer a definitive answer to that question, but we will discuss the possibilities. - The Merriam-Webster online dictionary says it should be pronounced: "t&-'ran-(")tO". - The CBC has a whole team of language advisors who devote their days to solving eternal questions like this. One of CBC's word gurus, Judy Maddren, proclaims the recommended CBC pronunciation of Toronto is: "tor-AWN-toh." But many Torontonians find that pronunciation ah-NOY-ing. - Wikipedia devotes an entire section to the pronunciation of Toronto saying, "Locals sometimes pronounce the city's name as 'Toronno', 'Trono', 'Toranna', 'Taranna', 'Chrono', 'Chranna' or even 'Terawhnna' ?in each case, the speaker merely pronounces 'Toronto' in the way that is most natural in his or her dialect." - Jack Chambers, a professor of linguistics at University of Toronto for more than 30 years, agrees with this logic, explaining that people born and bred in Toronto pronounce their hometown differently than outsiders because Torontonians say the name of their city repeatedly, over time becoming lazier about the pronunciation, eventually shortening it. "For people who live here their solution is to get rid of the 't' at the end."

The seemingly endless pronunciation possibilities got Steve Portigal, a Torontonian now based in San Francisco, into a heated debate this summer. On Mr. Portigal's blog, "All This ChittahChattah", he recounts the heated debate he had at a conference for new immigrants in Toronto: "I offered them some advice for fitting in? by not calling the city TOE-RON-TOE as many Americans do. Instead, I told them, we call it Trawna, and I even spelled it out - T-R-A-W-N-A."

The next morning a woman expressed her concern over this advice by asking Mr. Portigal: "Where is this Trawna thing coming from? Because? uh, we're FROM HERE and we don't say that ."
 

iT Girl

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Everyone I know pronounce it To ron to. I asked my great-grandfather and he says it's been pronounced To ron to since as long as he can remember and he is 99 years of age. He believes the mispronunciation came from poor people being illiterate in the old days and new immigrants that were often living in the poor quarters during the early 1930's and were learning to communicate in English from those illiterate people.
 

lashaiya

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Dear Urban Toronto,

My name is Lashaiya Coleman, a grade 12 student currently studying at Etobicoke School of the Arts, and as a Toronto citizen, I would like to address a concern I have with it.

This is a concern about the pronunciation of Toronto's name but I wanted to share some brief history of how the name originated. Named in honour of Prince Frederick, Duke of York, "York" became the name of our city. The residents were in opposition of the name and petitioned to have it changed back to its original name, "Toronto." That was back in 1834, and from then, it has always purposely been pronounced the way it is spelled. Our city was always pronounced with the second T and should always be pronounced with it. Excluding one of the letters is:

a) Trying to re-write history
b) Causes confusion for the ones who have not yet known how to properly pronounce it/ who do not know much about Toronto
c) Making citizens of our city look like they do not know how to properly represent it
d) Extracts Toronto's historical and cultural values
e) Constitutes an idealistic society

"Turonno" is not a word out of the 171,476 words in the English dictionary, nor in any dictionary or encyclopedia, nor is it a city. Toronto is the provincial capital of Ontario, located in the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario, and it called what it is, "Toronto." We call ourselves "Torontonians" and we enunciate the second T in it, and it does not make sense to live in "Turonno" and be called a "Torontonian." It is like providing a false address by spelling the street the way one would pronounce it rather than correctly spelling the name of the actual street. Packages and parcels would never be delivered!

It has been taken out of proportion and has been put on t-shirts/ merchandise to comoditate consumers. When visitors and travellers come here and want to buy souvenirs and keepsakes to say that they have visited Toronto, it will be spelled in such an incorrect way, and they will automatically think that it is correct when it is actually not. It is sad enough that many Canadians do not even know how to properly pronounce Toronto, emphasizing the purposely added T in it. No silent T.

I know and understand that some people who have accents do not exaggerate the second T, but just because it is a "new and different" way of saying it does NOT make it the correct way. There is also a new way of speaking for certain individuals who live in Toronto known as the "Toronto Mans" or "Hood Mans Accent." Those individuals pronounce Toronto with the second T so an accent might not even have an impact on they way the city is pronounced much less someone who does not have one. Once it is clarified, anyone should be able to pronounce it correctly.

Correct pronunciation according to CBC and Wiktionary:

- "tor-AWN-toh."
- IPA: /ˈtoronto/, [ˈt̪o̞ro̞nt̪o̞]

TuronNO, is a big no no. Turanna, Teranna, Taranna, Toranna, T'rono, and Chrono are all non-existent cities. So is every other spelling but "Toronto."

We should be respectfully representing our city and not change or re-write the history of it because we cannot do that. We need to teach our younger generation the right way and not the wrong, and we should educate them rather than trying to teach them facts and feed them information that does not exist. This is a major concern to be reiterated to the wonderful citizens of Toronto, and correct the actual mistake of the way we "pronounce" our city. As citizens, we should all be able to pronounce our home correctly. Toronto has changed enough - not all for the better - but it has changed internally, so at this point it is fine just the way it is and does not need a new title. Adjust it economically and not verbally. Do not relabel a package.

Fun Fact: Toronto's landmark, the CN Tower, will forever remind us of the second T in the name of the city because of the way it is shaped, like a T. Take a look at the adorable keychain image attached to this message!

Thank you,

LColeman

188626
 

Northern Light

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Dear Urban Toronto,

My name is Lashaiya Coleman, a grade 12 student currently studying at Etobicoke School of the Arts, and as a Toronto citizen, I would like to address a concern I have with it.

This is a concern about the pronunciation of Toronto's name but I wanted to share some brief history of how the name originated. Named in honour of Prince Frederick, Duke of York, "York" became the name of our city. The residents were in opposition of the name and petitioned to have it changed back to its original name, "Toronto." That was back in 1834, and from then, it has always purposely been pronounced the way it is spelled. Our city was always pronounced with the second T and should always be pronounced with it. Excluding one of the letters is:

a) Trying to re-write history
b) Causes confusion for the ones who have not yet known how to properly pronounce it/ who do not know much about Toronto
c) Making citizens of our city look like they do not know how to properly represent it
d) Extracts Toronto's historical and cultural values
e) Constitutes an idealistic society

"Turonno" is not a word out of the 171,476 words in the English dictionary, nor in any dictionary or encyclopedia, nor is it a city. Toronto is the provincial capital of Ontario, located in the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario, and it called what it is, "Toronto." We call ourselves "Torontonians" and we enunciate the second T in it, and it does not make sense to live in "Turonno" and be called a "Torontonian." It is like providing a false address by spelling the street the way one would pronounce it rather than correctly spelling the name of the actual street. Packages and parcels would never be delivered!

It has been taken out of proportion and has been put on t-shirts/ merchandise to comoditate consumers. When visitors and travellers come here and want to buy souvenirs and keepsakes to say that they have visited Toronto, it will be spelled in such an incorrect way, and they will automatically think that it is correct when it is actually not. It is sad enough that many Canadians do not even know how to properly pronounce Toronto, emphasizing the purposely added T in it. No silent T.

I know and understand that some people who have accents do not exaggerate the second T, but just because it is a "new and different" way of saying it does NOT make it the correct way. There is also a new way of speaking for certain individuals who live in Toronto known as the "Toronto Mans" or "Hood Mans Accent." Those individuals pronounce Toronto with the second T so an accent might not even have an impact on they way the city is pronounced much less someone who does not have one. Once it is clarified, anyone should be able to pronounce it correctly.

Correct pronunciation according to CBC and Wiktionary:

- "tor-AWN-toh."
- IPA: /ˈtoronto/, [ˈt̪o̞ro̞nt̪o̞]

TuronNO, is a big no no. Turanna, Teranna, Taranna, Toranna, T'rono, and Chrono are all non-existent cities. So is every other spelling but "Toronto."

We should be respectfully representing our city and not change or re-write the history of it because we cannot do that. We need to teach our younger generation the right way and not the wrong, and we should educate them rather than trying to teach them facts and feed them information that does not exist. This is a major concern to be reiterated to the wonderful citizens of Toronto, and correct the actual mistake of the way we "pronounce" our city. As citizens, we should all be able to pronounce our home correctly. Toronto has changed enough - not all for the better - but it has changed internally, so at this point it is fine just the way it is and does not need a new title. Adjust it economically and not verbally. Do not relabel a package.

Fun Fact: Toronto's landmark, the CN Tower, will forever remind us of the second T in the name of the city because of the way it is shaped, like a T. Take a look at the adorable keychain image attached to this message!

Thank you,

LColeman

View attachment 188626
I've heard this point raised before.

It has often confused me in as much as I don't hear the second-T dropped all that often, in fact I'd say its rather rare among people I know.

***

That said, the American coverage of the NBA finals has consistently shown me a different pronunciation of our City's name.

Where the way I say and hear the word is in these 3 syllables Tor-ON-To; Many Americans appears to hear/say To-Ron-To

Its quite peculiar really, and I'd be amused to know where that started.

***

Tangentially related, the ABC reporter in Jurassic Park kicked off the series by telling Americans that Canada is a country of 34,000,000 and Toronto (proper) (her word) has 7,500,000 of us. Rather makes me wonder who does their research. Presumably they also tell the on-air personalities how to pronounce our City's name.

Wikipedia reports the Q1 2019 estimate for Canada as 37,314,442

While Toronto (proper) is still just shy of 3,000,000.

The GTHA is somewhere around 7,500,000

And the GGH around 9,500,000
 

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