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Ottawa Transit Developments

nfitz

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(from the London thread, where it seems very off-topic)
But Ottawa built the Transitway with dedicated ROWs, and a very bare bones shelter at each stop ...
Bare bones? The busy ones were palatial compared to the Eglinton LRT. Even what you showed (not sure which station that is), is going to keep you dry, which the Eglinton ones won't.

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kEiThZ

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The busy ones were palatial compared to the Eglinton LRT.
What you have pictured here is Lees station. Similar to the Scott Street trench. These are some of the few stations where they had to actually spend money to grade separate. So they took advantage of the construction and added more shelters. These "palatial" stations were still just giant steel and glass shelters. The concrete you see is stabilizing the walls of the trench with some stairwells and an elevator or two. Other than the trenches themselves, this stuff was not expensive to build or maintain. A huge bargain, when you consider that they got over three decades out of them. And these trenches are now all being repurposed for rail, so those investments weren't a write-off either.

These aren't even the busiest stations. Lees is east of downtown and the Scott St trench is west of downtown. The downtown stations were literally pavement, giant bus shelters and signage on two corridors (Albert and Slater). And a good chunk of this has now been repurposed for STO services that have been rerouted through there. Same pavement. New bus shelters and signage. This is what downtown stops looked like just before the 95 was decommissioned:

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Ottawa managed to push nearly 10 000 pphpd through the core using that infrastructure.
 
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nfitz

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What you have pictured here is Lees station. Similar to the Scott Street trench. These are some of the few stations where they had to actually spend money to grade separate.
When I lived their in the late 1980s, the stations all looked similar. The bus stops downtown were different of course - at that time, they were saying that downtown was temporary, and the intention was to build a tunnel.
 

kEiThZ

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The bus stops downtown were different of course - at that time, they were saying that downtown was temporary, and the intention was to build a tunnel.

Not building the downtown tunnel was probably a lucky break. The tunnel would have been extremely expensive (diesel buses require lots of ventilation). And the sunk cost would have probably seen Ottawa stick with buses longer. Running on the surface in semi-exclusive and unsegegated corridors led to bus congestion that would eventually force a conversion to LRT.

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ARG1

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(from the London thread, where it seems very off-topic)

Bare bones? The busy ones were palatial compared to the Eglinton LRT. Even what you showed (not sure which station that is), is going to keep you dry, which the Eglinton ones won't.

View attachment 375425
To be fair, the Eglinton Line should not be used as a metric for palatial design. Literally any station that had any form of effort into it would seem grand compared to Eglinton. Even the curbside bus shelters that Viva had prior to the rapidway is more impressive than Eglinton:

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kEiThZ

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Part of the gripe seems to be that when it's called "LRT" people expect a much higher level of sheltering at stops. But Eglinton, outside the tunnel, is being built as an improved version of the St Clair streetcar.

This was not the case in Ottawa, where the "LRT" was always going to be the "train" for Ottawa. Indeed, Ottawa doesn't call it LRT. They call the entire system "O-Train", for both the LRT based Confederation Line and HRT based Trillium Line.
 

drum118

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drum118

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lrt's friend

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I do not believe for one minute that a surface tramway on Wellington Street would have prevented the current demonstrations and blockade. Even with the flexibility of buses, there is little or no transit across the Ottawa River in either direction at the present time.

The latest news pointed to placing concrete barriers on Wellington Street by crane to better control the demonstrations. Overhead wires would have made this more difficult.
 

drum118

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And please tell how many "truck protests will occur in the future"? By the time we get this built, we would probably have most restrictions lifted and there wouldn't be a reason for truck protests to happen.
My Crystals Ball said many more protest will happen in the future and will have nothing to do with the current bullshit protest.

By the time this tramway gets built, we will be dealing with something else and a few of those folks/family members will not be around who think Freedom come first and hell with rules.

We are about 10% population wise of the US who has seen 900,000 vs our 33,000 dead in place of 90,000 using the 10% rule as mostly of us follow the rules.

Bring on the surface tramway as it will be cheaper and faster to build than the tunnel.

Have a number of truckers in the family tree and they don't support the protest at all.
 

ARG1

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My Crystals Ball said many more protest will happen in the future and will have nothing to do with the current bullshit protest.

By the time this tramway gets built, we will be dealing with something else and a few of those folks/family members will not be around who think Freedom come first and hell with rules.

We are about 10% population wise of the US who has seen 900,000 vs our 33,000 dead in place of 90,000 using the 10% rule as mostly of us follow the rules.

Bring on the surface tramway as it will be cheaper and faster to build than the tunnel.

Have a number of truckers in the family tree and they don't support the protest at all.
Thing is we will have a ton of pedestrian protests, you know the standard ones where you have large crowds holding up large signs. Those will almost surely block the tramway from running, rather than vice versa. Meanwhile if we look at frequency of truck protests, those really only happen in very specific circumstances. I believe in the last 3 years only 2 truck protests have occurred, the one we currently have, and some event called United We Roll that I have never even heard of. In short you are enacting a policy to remove something that happens so infrequently. As a downside, you get a tramway that poorly integrates with the existing O-train system, thus reducing the ease of travelling between the two cities (transferring to the Otrain will require 200m+ walking connection that is unprotected from the cold and muddy Ottawa winter).
 

CapitalSeven

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I have yet to see anyone draw up a realistic plan for getting the tramway across the bridge, building platforms at Rideau, and getting around the corner onto Sussex. With bike lanes and improved pedestrian space of course. Then run it through a traffic simulator to show how anything will move at an acceptable pace. It just falls apart.
 

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