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Novel Coronavirus COVID-19 (nCoV-2019)

Admiral Beez

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What I don’t get, we know the crowded homes and factories/warehouses in NE/NW Toronto and Peel are where the outbreak is worse, but we’re not sending in public health to vaccinate where they work and live. Instead we’re vaccinating the likes of me and my mother in law, people who have the means to stay home and safe.
 

afransen

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What I don’t get, we know the crowded homes and factories/warehouses in NE/NW Toronto and Peel are where the outbreak is worse, but we’re not sending in public health to vaccinate where they work and live. Instead we’re vaccinating the likes of me and my mother in law, people who have the means to stay home and safe.
I think Ford made a big error in judgment a few weeks ago and we're all paying for it.
 
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Northern Light

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From the Globe's Gary Mason:


Excerpts:

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W. K. Lis

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Now you know why Doug Ford wants to give the Chair of Chartwell (Retirement Residences CSH-UN-T), Mike Harris, the Order of Ontario medal.

Chartwell hikes executive bonuses, gives high marks for pandemic response


From link.

Executive bonuses rose last year at Chartwell Retirement Residences CSH-UN-T +0.08% as the company said it responded effectively to the COVID-19 pandemic and gave itself perfect scores for employee engagement, customer satisfaction and its reputation with the public.

The corporate scorecard meant Chartwell paid out bonuses a higher level of its target goals than it did in 2019. Chartwell paid all four of its top executives in excess of $1-million, and each of the four received bigger bonuses than in 2019, when they served in lesser roles.

Chartwell is Canada’s largest operator of retirement homes. Long-term care, specifically, is only about 10 per cent of Chartwell’s business. In the COVID-19 crisis, however, the company has attracted outsized attention from critics of the deregulation of the long-term care sector in Ontario more than two decades ago. Former Ontario premier Mike Harris presided over that effort, and he has served as the chairman of the company’s board since 2003, collecting $223,000 in director’s fees in 2020.

In management’s discussion and analysis reviewing the 2020 year, Chartwell said 12 of its retirement residences and four of its long-term care homes had been declared by public-health authorities as of March 4 to be in COVID-19 outbreak. “Despite extraordinary efforts, COVID-19 tragically claimed the lives of some of our residents. Our thoughts are with those who lost loved ones to this disease.”
The pay information is included in the company’s proxy circular, which also includes two unitholder proposals. (Chartwell, structured as a trust, technically has “unitholders” rather than shareholders.)

One, from IBVM Foundation of Canada Inc., asks for a “human capital disclosure” on how Chartwell manages employees and the risks to them. The second, from Vancity Investment Management Ltd. on behalf of the IA Clarington Monthly Income SRI Class fund, asks the company to undertake a study of possibly implementing a living wage for its employees. Both proposals cite COVID-19 as a reason for them.

Chartwell asks unitholders to vote against both. It says increased human-capital disclosure in the 2021 circular should be satisfactory. And it says the living-wage proposal is oversimplified, restrictive and an inefficient use of resources. About 80 per cent of Chartwell’s employees are represented by labour unions, the company said.

Chief executive officer Vlad Volodarski, promoted to CEO on March 16, made $1.91-million, including a $323,967 bonus. It was more than double his 2019 pay, when he served as chief financial officer. His predecessor, Brent Binions, made $2.46-million in 2019.

Three other top executives made bonuses between $187,187 and $207,627, with total paycheques ranging from $1.04-million to $1.17-million.

Chartwell said its board decided to tweak its compensation plans in light of the pandemic. It divided the year by what occurred through March 15, and what happened after, awarding 100-per-cent bonuses for beating cash-flow targets through March 15. It awarded 50 per cent of bonuses for the post-March 15 performance.

All told, Chartwell reported adjusted funds-from-operations per unit of 81.4 cents, versus a goal of 98 cents. The company also made no payouts based on one- and two-year unitholder return, which had weights ranging from 15 per cent to 20 per cent of bonus for the executives. Chartwell units dropped by 14.5 per cent in 2020.

Overall, Chartwell paid out at 85 per cent of its targets until March 15, and ranges of 50 per cent to 67.5 per cent of target for the remainder of the year.

“The impact of the pandemic on Chartwell’s business was largely out of Management’s control,” the board explains in the circular. “For example, Chartwell’s business was significantly impacted by federal, provincial and local regulatory directives which prevented or delayed the acceptance of new residents into Chartwell residences as well as by the costs on the business to provide additional staffing in Chartwell residences and to provide appropriate personal protective equipment to Chartwell’s employees.”

The determining factors in executive pay, the board said, included its view that “Chartwell effectively responded to the many challenges presented by the pandemic,” including “sourcing of sufficient quantities of personal protective equipment,” and “providing meaningful and frequent communication to residences, residents, families and employees, and advocacy through industry associations and supporting sector peers.”

Also, it added, “None of Chartwell’s long-term care residences in Ontario required regulatory intervention in the operation of the residences.”

When Chartwell tweaked its plan in March, if shifted emphasis in the bonus plan away from the cash-flow goals and added weight to its employee engagement and “customer satisfaction and reputation” goals.

Chartwell said in surveys, 96 per cent of its residents and 95 per cent of residents’ families and friends responded that Chartwell “took important steps to keep them safe” and 94 per cent of residents’ families said the residents were safe living at Chartwell.

Chartwell said 44 per cent of employees in residences and 58 per cent of employees in the corporate offices strongly agreed with the statement “I am satisfied with Chartwell as a place to work,” up from 43 per cent and 52 per cent, respectively, in 2019.
 

Northern Light

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I think Ford made a big error in judgment a few weeks ago and we're all paying for it.

An error would imply that he lacked the information necessary to make a proper judgement; or that a reasonable person might have chosen the same course of action.

He has persistently and consistently chosen indefensibly bad courses of action on countless files.

The pandemic merely being the most serious of these.
 

Northern Light

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I am seeing a lot of talk about the new police powers, including of course many police forces tweeting that they won’t be doing random stops. For those who like the legal stuff for reference, here is the new regulation. https://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulat...-rr4XtikhFnYdWZkXrVmALO2tCPgJprv1xmiNnh0ru7dM

I shared this in the Doug Ford thread, but it seems equally apt to post it here:

I've been up for several hours, so decided to head out at 8am to grocery shop and grab a coffee.

At the coffee shop, I made a moment's small talk as the only customer ( I was, at 9am, only the 5th customer of the day, apparently)..................

But I digress.

The young woman, a University student, working behind the counter, expressed that she wondered if the risk of random police stops was affecting traffic............
then volunteers, that so far, in the pandemic, Toronto Police have pulled her over twice.......for no actual moving violations, just to inquire who she was, and where she was going. Of relevance to this......she was a woman of Asian-descent.

She wasn't actually complaining; but I expressed my distaste on her behalf; and noted that I as a middle-aged white man had not yet had that experience.........and I have grave concerns that that had happened to her, not once, but twice.
 

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CP 24 reports:

Published Saturday, April 17, 2021 9:56AM EDT
Last Updated Saturday, April 17, 2021 11:08AM EDT
Toronto police say they will not be performing random stops of people or vehicles under Ontario’s enhanced public health measures.
Ontario introduced sweeping new restrictions Friday in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19 in the province’s third wave.
 

NIL OMNI

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W. K. Lis

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Police in Ontario say they won't conduct random spot checks despite new powers

From link.

London police board questions constitutionality of expanded powers

Saturday marks the first day of at least six weeks of enhanced policing powers in Ontario in an attempt to curb an exponential rise in COVID-19 cases.

However, several police forces across the province have already said they do not intend to make use of additional powers that allow them to ask anyone outside their residence — including stopping vehicles — to indicate their purpose for leaving home and provide their address.

A ticket if individuals refused would cost roughly $750.
Peterborough Police and London Police Service tweeted "we will not be randomly stopping people." Both Waterloo Regional Police Service and Niagara Regional Police Service similarly tweeted, "We will not be conducting random vehicle or individual stops."

The president of the Peel Regional Police Association also took to Twitter to urge the government, "Don't make cops the bad guys here!"

In a subsequent statement, Peel Police confirmed they would not conduct "random vehicle or individual stops."

In a statement, the Ottawa Police Service said it will also not be conducting random checks.

"We are very mindful of the perception of the broader public as well as within our more marginalized, racialized and/or Indigenous/Aboriginal/Inuit peoples," said Ottawa police chief Peter Sloly.

"We do not want these powers to impact public trust," Sloly said.

While Toronto police initially said it needed more time to review the changes, the force tweeted on Saturday morning that it "will continue to engage, educate and enforce, but we will not be doing random stops of people or cars."

"Prior to any change in our enforcement strategy we will notify the public on how we plan to implement the new provincial orders," its spokesperson said.

A spokesperson for the Toronto police declined to answer a question from CBC News about where this leaves people legally given an individual officer could still decide to pull over a person randomly and the law would be on their side, despite the force's official position statements.

The spokesperson deferred reporters to the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police, in addition to declining to answer whether Toronto police were in contact with the provincial government about their approach to random stops.

CBC News has reached out to the police chiefs association for comment.

A spokesperson for the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP), which is tasked with enforcing interprovincial border closures and has also been empowered to conduct random checks, said the force is "still working out the logistics and details."

It expects to share more with the public about its enforcement approach in the coming days.

Hamilton Police Service released its own statement, saying it will also not be randomly stopping citizens.

Police officers "remain committed to providing the highest quality of policing services and want to assure Hamilton citizens that our members will not be conducting arbitrary vehicle and person stops for the sole purpose of enforcing the Stay-at-Home order," the statement reads.

Windsor Police, Cornwall Police Service, and York Regional Police added their names to the growing list of police forces that say they will not conduct random checks.

"Members of the CPS will not be conducting random pedestrian or vehicle stops. We will continue to respond to complaints on a calls-for-service basis, using officer discretion, with the objective of gaining compliance," reads a statement from Cornwall police.

"Officers will not be randomly stopping people or vehicles," Windsor police tweeted.

"We all need to do our part for the health and safety of our community. Everyone has a role and a responsibility to keep our City safe. Stay home and do not gather with people outside your household."

In a statement, York Regional Police Chief Jim MacSween said enforcement efforts would "continue as they have since the beginning of the pandemic."

He said, "We will not be conducting random vehicle or individual stops."

The London Police Services Board says it has "serious concerns" about whether the provincial government's expanded police powers are even constitutional.

"We cannot enforce our way out of the pandemic," said the board's chair Dr. Javeed Sukhera in a statement released Saturday morning.

Sukhera said the board "would encourage the Provincial government to shift their focus to stabilizing the health system, ensuring equitable access to vaccines, and following the advice of health experts."

CBC News has reached out to the solicitor general's office for comment but has yet to receive a response.
The expanded police powers have quickly raised alarm bells across the province.

"It's a Black Friday of rights slashing by Queen's Park," said Michael Bryant, executive director of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association in a statement.

"A hodge-podge of pandemic restrictions cannot be policed like this because overzealous enforcers overshoot the mark, based on Canada's 1st Wave experience," Bryant's statement said.

He called random police stops "unconstitutional" since they wouldn't be "indiscriminate, stopping everyone in a single location" like a RIDE program does.

"Blanket powers for police to stop vehicles like this bends our constitutional freedoms too far, and will cause a rash of racial profiling," Bryant said. "These new restrictions… may face a court challenge."

Guelph Mayor Cam Guthrie tweeted his own reaction, saying he'll be "checking out our Charter [of Rights and Freedoms]" and that the city will be reviewing it.

"I'm concerned about this," his tweet said. "Either way, we're not going to be policing our way out of this pandemic, that's for sure."

In Toronto, Mayor John Tory tweeted that he was "very concerned about arbitrary stops of people by police at any time." He later tweeted his gratitude that Toronto police will not be conducting random stops.

Same should be done with the playgrounds, golf courses, tennis courts, and other non-contact sports or activities. Especially when its one household, family, or close friends.
 

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