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King Street (Streetcar Transit Priority)

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Why is it there if it's meaningless?
As practice area for motorists so they can then move on to ignoring No Stopping signs, start blocking intersections and finally running red lights? If so ... "Mission Accomplished"!

The non-enforcement of these Transit Only signs is really the 'Broken Window' problem of traffic enforcement. ("Broken window theory is the concept that each problem that goes unattended in a given environment affects people's attitude toward that environment and leads to more problems.)
 

SunriseChampion

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As practice area for motorists so they can then move on to ignoring No Stopping signs, start blocking intersections and finally running red lights? If so ... "Mission Accomplished"!

The non-enforcement of these Transit Only signs is really the 'Broken Window' problem of traffic enforcement. ("Broken window theory is the concept that each problem that goes unattended in a given environment affects people's attitude toward that environment and leads to more problems.)
Well put.

ffs.....it's too bad.
 

W. K. Lis

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Meanwhile, in Seattle...

Bus lane / queue jump coming to 3rd and Virginia

See link and link.

3rd Avenue Rechannelization

Northwestbound and Southeastbound 3rd Avenue (between Stewart Street and Virginia Street)

The Seattle Department of Transportation is working to reduce delay for buses along 3rd Avenue.

This project will benefit approximately 168,000 daily bus riders on 36 key routes that operate on 3rd Avenue, including Routes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21, 24, 26, 27, 28, 29, 33, 36, 40, 55, 56, 57, 62, 70, 116, 118, 119, 120, 124, 131, 132, C Line, D Line, and E Line by rechannelizing the block and installing a southeastbound 24-hour red bus only lane in the center lane.
SDOT is planning the following changes:
  • Convert the center lane in the southeastbound direction from a general-purpose lane to a 24-hour, 7 days per week, red bus only lane;
  • Convert the existing right lane in the southeastbound direction from a general purpose through lane to a right turn only lane from 6 am - 7 pm except buses, bikes, and loading or deliveries allowed for through movement 9 am - 3 pm; and
  • Remove the existing curbside right turn lanes at 3rd Ave and Stewart Street and replace with 30-minute commercial and 3-minute passenger loading zones.




Olive Way Red Bus Lane Treatment

Northeastbound Olive Way (between 4th Avenue and 8th Avenue)

The Seattle Department of Transportation is working to reduce delay for buses that travel northeastbound on Olive Way (between 4th Avenue and 8th Avenue).

The project will benefit approximately 33,000 daily bus riders on 39 key regional routes that operate on Olive Way, including Routes: 41, 111, 114, 177, 178, 190, 212, 214, 216, 218, 219, 252, 255, 257, 268, 311, CT 402, CT 405, CT 410, CT 412, CT 413, CT 415, CT 416, CT 417, CT 421, CT 422, CT 424, CT 425, CT435, ST 510, ST 511, ST 512, ST 513, ST 545, ST 578, ST 590, ST 592, ST 594, and ST 595 by converting the existing bus only lane to a full time bus only lane and installing red paint to make the lane more visible.
SDOT is planning the following changes:
  • Olive Way between 4th Avenue and 8th Avenue: convert the existing AM and PM peak bus only lane to 24/7 red bus only lane; and
  • Relocate the existing commercial loading zone on Olive Way between 4th Ave and 5th Ave to provide more space for right turning vehicles.




Red Bus Lane Treatments in Downtown Seattle are on Their Way!

The Seattle Department of Transportation is working to install red bus lanes. Red bus lanes help to improve compliance with bus-only restrictions and keep buses moving. The following locations are planned for red bus lanes:
  • Northbound Westlake Avenue (between 6th Avenue and 9th Avenue)
  • Eastbound Pike Street (between 2nd Avenue and 8th Avenue)
  • Northbound 5th Avenue (between S Washington Street and Marion Street)
These changes are made through our Spot Improvements program, which provides changes to city streets to reduce travel delays and improve travel times for transit in Seattle.
 

thettctransitfanatic

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Meanwhile, in Seattle...

Bus lane / queue jump coming to 3rd and Virginia

See link and link.

3rd Avenue Rechannelization

Northwestbound and Southeastbound 3rd Avenue (between Stewart Street and Virginia Street)









That would be a good idea on King for the Express routes, and other places such as Jane and Dufferin as well









That would be a good idea on King for the Express routes and other places like Dufferin and King as well
 

W. K. Lis

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The other cities trying out bus only roadways shows that it is not just streetcar routes that they are trying to give preferable priority to public transit. If it wasn't for the streetcars on King, it would be buses. In Toronto, it could be coming to bus routes as well.

See link.

 

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If you have a proper signal system you can run streetcars anywhere.

One of my favourite tram routes in Berlin is the M1. I used to ride it regularly from Hackescher Markt S to either Pankow S/U or Freidrichstrasse S/U but also rode the entire length out of curiosity.

It runs on its own right of way and in traffic, from curb lane to middle of the street, on one ways and two ways. on grassy bits and pavement, but like all Berlin trams it has proper, dedicated signals. It's never more than a minute late, never bunches up and never short turns (Berliners wouldn't understand the concept of a short turn and would probably lynch the driver at the mere suggestion!).

It has great transfer points for various U Bahn, S Bahn and Regional lines and now goes to Hauptbahnhof as they return trams to the west.

Proper Dedicated Signals!!
 

W. K. Lis

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If you have a proper signal system you can run streetcars anywhere.

One of my favourite tram routes in Berlin is the M1. I used to ride it regularly from Hackescher Markt S to either Pankow S/U or Freidrichstrasse S/U but also rode the entire length out of curiosity.

It runs on its own right of way and in traffic, from curb lane to middle of the street, on one ways and two ways. on grassy bits and pavement, but like all Berlin trams it has proper, dedicated signals. It's never more than a minute late, never bunches up and never short turns (Berliners wouldn't understand the concept of a short turn and would probably lynch the driver at the mere suggestion!).

It has great transfer points for various U Bahn, S Bahn and Regional lines and now goes to Hauptbahnhof as they return trams to the west.

Proper Dedicated Signals!!
Noticed a couple of things in the video.

1. The stops are not close together, but further apart. Makes the trams run faster.
2. No coming to a complete stop at the track switches. They take them at a much faster speed than the TTC streetcars do.
3. No verbage signs (with words) saying that this transit signal (vertical, horizontal, and diagonal bars) are "transit signals". No need for the sign clutter that Toronto is forced to use.
 

tayser

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How not to build a brand new light rail line. Cost blow outs to $2.1 billion for what is essentially an early 1900s tram line implemented in 2019, complete with huge dwell times, no traffic light priority and all around shitf*kery. I give you, Sydney's L2 and L3 opening a few weeks ago.


Despite the bla services that everyone up there is talking about, one thing I've noticed in all the videos: George St is leaps and bounds much better than what it was (like most Sydney streets: narrow / dark, little attention given to pedestrians and making streets attractive and the like). Now though, outstanding. Note around 5 min: many locals still not used to trams in their new pedestrians section of George St.
 

CityStay

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How not to build a brand new light rail line. Cost blow outs to $2.1 billion for what is essentially an early 1900s tram line implemented in 2019, complete with huge dwell times, no traffic light priority and all around shitf*kery. I give you, Sydney's L2 and L3 opening a few weeks ago.


Despite the bla services that everyone up there is talking about, one thing I've noticed in all the videos: George St is leaps and bounds much better than what it was (like most Sydney streets: narrow / dark, little attention given to pedestrians and making streets attractive and the like). Now though, outstanding. Note around 5 min: many locals still not used to trams in their new pedestrians section of George St.
I saw the opening day version of this. Lots of transit 'ambassadors' cheering and singing lol! Looks good to me, what's the problem?
 

CityStay

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Noticed a couple of things in the video.

1. The stops are not close together, but further apart. Makes the trams run faster.
2. No coming to a complete stop at the track switches. They take them at a much faster speed than the TTC streetcars do.
3. No verbage signs (with words) saying that this transit signal (vertical, horizontal, and diagonal bars) are "transit signals". No need for the sign clutter that Toronto is forced to use.
The average distance between stops in Berlin are between 400 and 500 m (430 on M1) although when you get out into the far eastern slablands they seem to be closer to 1 km. They tend to run straight out there and perform more like LRTs.

They do fly over those switches.

The TTC tends to 'oversign' everything, witness the dozen or so stickers as you enter a bus. I don't know how anyone could confuse transit signals with regular traffic signals.
 

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The TTC tends to 'oversign ........... I don't know how anyone could confuse transit signals with regular traffic signals.
Actually, in Ontario we do not have a specific approved transit signal design (the white bar system that Walter Lis is always posting about!). If we did (and that needs Provincial action) it would certainly be clearer what they are for. Here 'transit signals' look very like regular traffic lights so signage is probably necessary.
 

W. K. Lis

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The Innovative Way Ghent Removed Cars From The City

From link.


Witness the transformation of Ghent, Belgium, who instituted the Traffic Circulation Plan in April 2017, which completely changed the way nearly every resident gets around the city and has inspired unheard of mode shifts. It encourages less car use, more bicycling and more transit use by splitting the city into seven distinct zones: a mostly car-free city center core surrounded by six zones which have been cordoned off with concrete or controlled by cameras. The only way to reach them is to travel to the ring road on the city outskirts, thus making it not impossible to use a car but motivates those shorter trips to be done via human power or mass transit. Bike mode share in 2012 was 22%, now it is 35% and growing!

This swift, creative strategy of turning Ghent in to a place for people is such a phenomenal story it's a mystery as to why it has not gotten more attention worldwide. It is a city of 262,000 residents, so not a large metropolis, but not a small city either. The metamorphosis was achieved thru a sort of tactical urbanism approach by throwing concrete barriers and planters here and there (some backed by enforcement cameras) and altering the gateways into public spaces and safer places to walk and bike. (There are now 40% fewer cars on bicycle priority streets than before the plan!)

Their main inspirations were the cities of Groningen and Utrecht, both in The Netherlands. And as Vice Mayor, Filip Watteeuw explains they did not have the funds or the time to spend 10, 20 or 30 years to catch up to where they were. So they improvised with interesting tactics and treatments and The Traffic Circulation Plan. And as I have said before what happened was stunning: almost never has their been such a rapid metamorphosis occurred in such a short time. And Ghent isn't stopping there.

Ghent was a fabulous city for many reasons. I highly recommend a visit. It is quiet and lovely and nearly everywhere is attainable by multiple modes of transportation. You can even use a car if you like - but just remember it is a little more complicated.
 

TransitBart

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@W. K. Lis et al, it’s all lovely. These smaller cities are wise examples of good urban design that all of us admire when we travel and wish we could bring home.

But Toronto is in a different realm and we need to aspire to the solutions of New York, London, Tokyo, and Hong Kong. Even Ottawa can not model itself on Ghent. As I read last summer about the opening of the Confederation Line, I learned that Ottawa had about 1000 buses in the OC Transpo fleet. That is not a small urban centre. Toronto less so.

The only way to free up the real estate for this super surface realm is to create massive off-street capacity for moving people. Bring on the Ontario Line and Line 7 and Line 8 after. As much as we want other solutions meanwhile, it is neither practical, nor salable to the populace.
 

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