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Is the west side of Toronto more prominent than the east side?

King of Kensington

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Amy Lavender Harris, a geography professor at York University, says big city structures like the viaduct make regional rivalries more obvious.
After all, the viaduct is a clear border separating the core from the residential neighbourhoods of the east end, whereas, once could argue, there is no distinct structure separating central Toronto from the residential west end.
 

jje1000

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South of Bloor, I've always thought that Spadina Avenue forms the visual/psychological boundary between central Toronto and the west.

The area between University and Spadina sort of feels like a transition zone as it has characteristics of both. On the other hand, I feel like that from Jarvis to the Don River is where the transition from central to east Toronto occurs.

North of Bloor, is there all that much of a difference?
 

blixtex

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South of Bloor, I've always thought that Spadina Avenue forms the visual/psychological boundary between central Toronto and the west.

The area between University and Spadina sort of feels like a transition zone as it has characteristics of both. On the other hand, I feel like that from Jarvis to the Don River is where the transition from central to east Toronto occurs.

North of Bloor, is there all that much of a difference?
Bloor is the clear dividing line. I work near Bloor and there is a clear difference in the crowd, density, structures, etc. And you don't see streetcars north of Bloor which is also a defining attribute of being 'Torontoish'. I would agree with the assessment of separation. People from the East will go up to Spadina and still feel it's still East ish, while people from the West, will go up to University and it still feel Westish for them.
 

King of Kensington

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Bloor is the clear dividing line. I work near Bloor and there is a clear difference in the crowd, density, structures, etc. And you don't see streetcars north of Bloor which is also a defining attribute of being 'Torontoish'. I would agree with the assessment of separation. People from the East will go up to Spadina and still feel it's still East ish, while people from the West, will go up to University and it still feel Westish for them.
Do you mean Jarvis?
 

WislaHD

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South of Bloor, I've always thought that Spadina Avenue forms the visual/psychological boundary between central Toronto and the west.

The area between University and Spadina sort of feels like a transition zone as it has characteristics of both. On the other hand, I feel like that from Jarvis to the Don River is where the transition from central to east Toronto occurs.

North of Bloor, is there all that much of a difference?
North of Bloor looks at the East vs West debate and laughs.

Midtown wins all. 😈
 

SunriseChampion

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Midtown wins all. 😈
The only thing Midtown wins is the title of being the only flat in Toronto I've ever lived in that had a cockroach problem. :p
Davisville roach posse, where ya at?!
 

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