Heritage Toronto Mondays | Page 4

Discussion in 'Photos and Videos' started by interchange42, May 10, 2010.

  1. junctionist

    junctionist Senior Member

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    The TTC also didn't want to build the station at Glencairn immediately upon constructing the extension to save money. It wasn't just the opposition of some NIMBYs.

    Too bad the Spadina line didn't go under Bathurst. Rather than being isolated in the middle of an expressway, the line could have been better used with greater development potential.
     
    #46

  2. interchange42

    interchange42 Administrator Staff Member

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    UrbanToronto has partnered with Heritage Toronto to capture a moment in Toronto's past. On a weekly basis, we will both be highlighting a historic photo of the city's people, places and events, and will be telling the stories behind them.

    Many thanks to both Gary Switzer of MOD Developements and Maya Bilbao for putting together the photos and research.

    This week's photo:
    [​IMG]


    JOHNNY LOMBARDI

    Johnny Lombardi owns a spot in Toronto history as one of the great Italian Canadians. Born on December 4, 1915 in Toronto's Little Italy, Johnny Barbalinardo Lombardi was the child of Italian immigrants. He developed an interest in music early on, and had his own band during his teenage years. Lombardi moved to London, Ontario in the 1930s to join the well known Benny Palmer Orchestra as lead trumpeter. During the War, Lombardi served overseas as sergeant, and furthered his interest in music by taking positions including part-time bandsman and orchestra leader.

    Following the war, Lombardi moved back to Toronto and worked as the proprietor of a grocery store, a business that first started on Dundas and later moved to the College and Grace street area, where Lombardi spent most of his life. Lombardi's interest in entertainment continued in 1947 when he secured a one hour time slot on CHUM Radio promoting music that catered to Toronto’s Italian community. In 1966, Lombardi founded CHIN Multicultural Radio and the CHIN International Picnic.

    Lombardi became a highly influential personality within the Italian Canadian community in Toronto, often called the "mayor of Little Italy." A recipient of the Order of Canada, Lombardi's life is honoured with a memorial on the southwest corner of College Street and Grace Street, known as Piazza Johnny Lombardi. Lombardi passed away in 2002.

    Sources:
    http://www.encyclopediecanadienne.ca/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0009855
    http://www.torontohistory.org/Pages_JKL/Johnny_Lombardi.html
    http://chinradio.com/johnny-lombardi/

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  3. Long Island Mike

    Long Island Mike Senior Member

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    I42: I remember this pic being posted here at UT in the past and if it was not for the mention of Maple Leaf Gardens on the signs and on the car that this would look straight out of Brooklyn...

    As many know the Italian-American community in the NYC area is one of the largest outside Italy...and I found that Toronto has a substantial Italian-Canadian community which surprised me to some extent...

    I have noticed that many Great Lake cities have Italian heritage neighborhoods like Buffalo and Chicago...and I remember hearing of communities in smaller cities like Sault St.Marie...

    For some reason when I think of Toronto the WASP heritage is the first thing I think of...I now know how diverse Toronto actually is with immigrants from all over Europe as an example...

    LI MIKE
     
    #48
  4. Edward Skira

    Edward Skira http://skyrisecities.com Staff Member

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    At one point Toronto had the second or third largest Italian population of any city in the world.
     
    #49
  5. interchange42

    interchange42 Administrator Staff Member

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    UrbanToronto has partnered with Heritage Toronto to capture a moment in Toronto's past. On a weekly basis, we will both be highlighting a historic photo of the city's people, places and events, and will be telling the stories behind them.

    Many thanks to both Gary Switzer of MOD Developements and Derek Boles for putting together the photos and research.

    This week's photo:
    [​IMG]
    City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1244, Item 826

    CROWDS WISH SOLDIERS GOODBYE AS THEY LEAVE UNION STATION

    This image from World War I shows loved ones seeing off members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force possibly traveling to the military training camp at Camp Borden near Barrie or Valcartier near Quebec City before being shipped overseas. Of the approximately 60,000 Torontonians who fought in the Great War, 10,000 were killed and 20,000 wounded. This view is looking north along Front Street, with the old Great Western Station behind the train. The Grand Trunk Pacific was a subsidiary of the Grand Trunk operating between Winnipeg and the Pacific coast. Colonist cars were built to carry immigrants from ocean ports to Canada's interior.


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    #50
  6. interchange42

    interchange42 Administrator Staff Member

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    UrbanToronto has partnered with Heritage Toronto to capture a moment in Toronto's past. On a weekly basis, we will both be highlighting a historic photo of the city's people, places and events, and will be telling the stories behind them.

    Many thanks to both Gary Switzer of MOD Developements and Maya Bilbao for putting together the photos and research.

    This week's photo:
    [​IMG]


    FRONT STREET 1928

    From the 1790's to 1928 (when this photograph was taken), a lot had taken place on Front Street. Early on, Front was the closest street to Lake Ontario. At that time, it was literally a stone's throw from the water's edge, lined with homes belonging to York inhabitants who, needless to say, had spectacular views of the lake. Over time, landfill extended the southern boundary of the city south of Front Street and what was once the water's of Lake Ontario became a thriving area for commerce, industry, and the railway. By 1928, Front was lined with a diverse collection of structures, built of varying styles, from manufacturing and industrial buildings to retail offices and hotels.

    1928 was a busy year for Front Street West. It was just one year after the opening of Union Station, a spectacular new train station on the south side of Front between Bay and York Streets. Union Station was designed in the fashionable Beaux Arts style, and is still considered one of Toronto's finest examples of this trend. Its distinctive columns can be seen on the left side of this photo. During the grand opening in 1927, Edward, Prince of Wales remarked: “You build your stations like we build our cathedrals.” Union Station was also said to be "the largest and most opulent station erected in Canada."

    1928 was also one year before the new Royal York Hotel opened. Located on the north side of Front Street, west of Bay extending to York Street, the Royal York was strategically located across the street from Union Station. It was initiated by the Canadian Pacific Railway and designed by popular Montreal architects Ross and MacDonald in association with Toronto's Sproatt and Rolph. The Royal York opened in 1929 soaring to 28 storeys, making it the largest hotel in the British Empire. At that time, it was known as: “A city within a city block.” The Royal York was designed in the Chateau style, of Indiana limestone rising to a copper roof, and was instantly known as one of Toronto's most elegant hotels. The Royal York changed the Toronto skyline, and still remains a highly identifiable landmark, known today as the Fairmont Royal York Hotel.

    Along with the Royal York, there were several other hotels along Front at that time including the Walker House Hotel. Located at the corner of Front and York Streets, the Walker House was adjacent to Union Station, known as one of Toronto's most notable hotels of the 19th and 20th centuries. Its distinctive solid, symmetrical shape can be seen just behind the columns of Union Station. Sadly, aside from the Royal York and Union Station, many of the buildings seen in this photo no longer exist.

    Transportation enthusiasts will certainly be interested to see the streetcar running along Front, as well as the varied collection of motor vehicles humming along.


    Sources

    "http://www.toronto.ca/union_station/history.htm#opening
    City of Toronto directory, Front Street West, 1928 (Toronto Reference Library)
    Map of Toronto, 4th floor, (Toronto Reference Library)
    http://www.heritagefdn.on.ca/userfiles/page_attachments/Library/1/1785874_Royal_York_ENG.pdf
    http://www.fairmont.com/EN_FA/Property/RYH/AboutUs/HotelHistory.htm

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    #51
  7. adma

    adma Superstar

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    I presume that's hoarding at the base of the Royal York--yet I don't know whether it's a measure of photographic technology or of coal-fired pollution that the Royal York already looks like it has the patina of grime...
     
    #52
  8. Mustapha

    Mustapha Senior Member

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    I think the NIMBY-ism gave the TTC the excuse they needed. Even as a kid I followed the debates in the papers about whether a station should be built at Lytton and Yonge. If you walk around the Snider parkette on the NW corner, you realize that it could nicely accomodate a station and a bus turnaround without further expropriation.

    For that matter, a station at the old city limits, at Yonge blvd would be useful.
     
    #53
  9. Edward Skira

    Edward Skira http://skyrisecities.com Staff Member

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    The problem with a station at Yonge Blvd is the depth of the tunnels. They are really deep there making it relatively difficult accessing the station without elevators.
     
    #54
  10. thecharioteer

    thecharioteer Senior Member

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    There was also talk at the time of the Spadina line of having a stop between St. Clair and Eglinton, however the halfway point would have been Cedarvale Park (in the heart of a single-family neighbourhood), which would have been uneconomical. A stop at Bathurst and the bridge would have been nice, and would have been about the same distance as between St. Clair and Summerhill on the Yonge line.
     
    #55
  11. adma

    adma Superstar

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    Or, for that matter, btw/Spadina and Dupont on the Spadina line. (Is that the shortest interval btw/subway stops in Toronto?)
     
    #56
  12. interchange42

    interchange42 Administrator Staff Member

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    UrbanToronto has partnered with Heritage Toronto to capture a moment in Toronto's past. On a weekly basis, we will both be highlighting a historic photo of the city's people, places and events, and will be telling the stories behind them.

    Many thanks to both Gary Switzer of MOD Developements and Maya Bilbao for putting together the photos and research.

    This week's photo:
    [​IMG]
    Archives of Ontario, neg. ref. no. F 229-308-0-807

    EATON'S SANTA CLAUS PARADE

    The Eaton's Santa Claus parade was an institution in Toronto. It was the brainchild of legendary Canadian retailer Timothy Eaton who founded the largest department store in Canada. By the time of his passing in 1907, Eaton's department store took up several acres at the intersection of Queen and Yonge. It extended into surrounding streets that were lined with numerous manufacturing and service buildings including Eaton’s Annex and the Mail Order building. James Street, just west of Yonge became an important street for Eaton’s, busy with the daily traffic of employees and shoppers. In this 1926 photo hundreds of people brave the cold November weather on James Street to watch the Eaton’s Santa Claus Parade.

    From the beginning, Timothy Eaton targeted shoppers with advertising tactics to keep them interested in shopping at Eaton's. Among the most powerful promotional tools that Timothy Eaton initiated was the Eaton’s Santa Claus Parade. It first debuted in Toronto on December 2nd 1905, making it one of the first parades of its kind in North America, and certainly the first Santa Claus parade sponsored by Eaton’s in Canada. The parade was a success with children who waited for months to see the colourful costumes, floats, marching bands, and most importantly, Santa Claus. Eaton's prided itself on making its own costumes and floats for the parade that took an entire year to manufacture.

    Children by the thousands applied to march in the parade. The lucky ones got to wear spectacular costumes that day, and were given a small fee as well as cocoa and cookies. For the kids watching the parade on the street, favourite characters included Cinderella, Mother Goose, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White and Little Red Riding Hood. The favourite Christmas song played during the parade was, not surprisingly Jingle Bells.
    Beginning in the 1950's, the parade took on a theme including “Rhymes and Fairy tales from distant lands” in 1954, “The Royal Road to Toyland” in 1958, “Santa's Jubilee Parade” in 1964.

    The parade was such a success, that, beginning in the 1950s it was televised to millions across Canada. American network giant CBS also broadcast the parade in the United States. Eaton's also put together a short 16mm film of the parade that was shown in theatres across Canada and the world.

    Due to financial problems, the Eaton’s Santa Claus parade was discontinued by Eaton's in 1982, but immediately saved thanks to 20 firms who offered to sponsor the parade. Since 1905, it has been one of the most important events in Toronto that celebrate the festivity of Christmas. Today, it remains one of the largest parades of its kind in the world, known simply as the Toronto Santa Claus Parade.

    Sources

    The store that Timothy Built, passim.
    http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/on-line-exhibits/eatons/eatons-parade.aspx
    http://www.alanbrown.com/TorontoHistory/Graphics/Santa_Claus_Parade_Plaque.jpg


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    #57
  13. interchange42

    interchange42 Administrator Staff Member

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    UrbanToronto has partnered with Heritage Toronto to capture a moment in Toronto's past. On a weekly basis, we will both be highlighting a historic photo of the city's people, places and events, and will be telling the stories behind them.

    Many thanks to both Gary Switzer of MOD Developements and Maya Bilbao for putting together the photos and research.

    This week's photo:
    [​IMG]

    BERKELEY HOUSE 1908

    Captured in this 1908 photograph is the home of Major John Small. Born in England in 1746, Small emigrated to Upper Canada and was appointed clerk of the Executive Council of Upper Canada in*1792. Small was described by Lieutenant Governor, John Graves Simcoe as “a Gentleman who possesses and is entitled to my highest confidence.” Small took on several other posts including Justiceship on the Peace in York, Lieutenant-Colonelcy of the York militia in 1798, and Office of Clerk of the Crown and Pleas from 1806 to 1825. Small was perhaps most famous for participating in an historic duel in January 1800 where he fatally wounded the Attorney General of Upper Canada, John White. Small was acquitted on a charge of murder after a brief trial.

    In 1795, Small purchased an existing log house at the southwest corner of today's Berkeley and King Streets that was one of the first domestic buildings erected in the Town of York. The hewn log building was described by preeminent historian and author Henry Scadding in 1873 as “one of the usual low looking domiciles of the country with central portion and two gable wings, somewhat after the fashion of many an old country manor house in England.”

    Small and later his son Charles expanded the home. At one point the exterior was stuccoed and renovated with the addition of Gothic style fenestration. Berkeley House was located on a one acre property surrounded by a yard and garden described as “one of the great social centres and few indeed are the members of the old aristocracy who have not danced or dined beneath its roof.”

    By the 20th century Berkeley House was past its prime and was demolished in 1926. Today's Berkeley Street is said to be named after the small estate owned by Major John Small.

    Sources

    Toronto No Mean City, p.21-25
    http://www.townofyork.com/model/legend45.html
    Toronto of Old by Henry Scadding, passim
    http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?id_nbr=3136&interval=25&


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    #58
  14. thecharioteer

    thecharioteer Senior Member

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    Berkeley House in more bucolic days:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Just before demolition:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2011
    #59
  15. interchange42

    interchange42 Administrator Staff Member

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    UrbanToronto has partnered with Heritage Toronto to capture a moment in Toronto's past. On a weekly basis, we will both be highlighting a historic photo of the city's people, places and events, and will be telling the stories behind them.

    Many thanks to both Gary Switzer of MOD Developements and Maya Bilbao for putting together the photos and research.

    This week's photo:
    [​IMG]

    Independent Order of Foresters' Arch, Bay Street at Richmond Street West erected for the visit of Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York 1901

    In 1901, the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York, later King George V and Queen Mary visited Canada. The Royal Couple travelled extensively throughout the country and toured Ontario between October 10-16th. The first stop in the province was Toronto where they were greeted at the foot of St. George Street by numerous dignitaries including then Premier of Ontario G. W. Ross and Prime Minister Sir Wilfred Laurier.

    On the first day of the tour, the Royal Carriage journeyed St. George Street, Bloor Street, Jarvis, Carlton, Yonge, King and finally Bay Streets leading up to the City Hall, then the New City Hall that had opened a couple of years prior. Every step of the way, there were decorations, thousands of spectators, and dignitaries waiting to welcome the Royal Couple in style.

    As the Royal Carriage travelled along Bay Street it was met with a spectacular arch at Richmond Street. It was one of several ceremonial arches that were erected for this special occasion in Toronto. The arch was decorated with numerous flags, flashing light bulbs, and crests. Topped with a large crown, the arch was erected by the Independent Order of Foresters, a fraternal organization that owned the commanding structure adjacent to the arch on the northwest corner of Richmond and Bay.

    The Temple building as it came to be known was designed by well known architect, George W. Gouinlock. Opening in 1895, it was one of the first highrise buildings in Toronto that eventually stood ten storeys and commanded attention in the downtown core. It was designed in the Richardsonian Romanesque style... a popular trend at the time shared by its neighbour, today's Old City Hall. This immediate success of this new office building on Bay Street contributed to Bay's overall development as a street lined with office buildings.

    Demolished in 1970, the Temple building is remembered as an important work in Toronto's architectural history. The ceremonial arch was taken down before that but fortunately photographs such as this serve as a powerful reminder for the significance of the monarchy in the daily lives of Canadians.


    Sources

    http://www.toronto.ca/archives/thismonth.htm
    The tour of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York through the Dominion of Canada in the year 1901, Published in 1903 (www.Archive.org)
    Lost Toronto, pg. 102


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