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GO Transit: Construction Projects (Metrolinx, various)

drum118

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Burlington
Tim's is open at Burlington GO station and Burlington Transit has moved buses back to the new bus bay for them back in Sept. Buses were still on the north side when I was there in Aug. Tim's was very busy and not surprise for this.

Confederation
Nothing has started on the new Confederation station itself or the tracks, but the bus terminal is done along with a small parking lot. The parking lot wasn't full when I was there.

There are 4 bus stops with GO having 3 of them and Dart for the other one. There is one shelter with a heater in it, but didn't need on today as it was so warm, I wasn't wearing a coat.
A few quick shot for now as they are in a backlog at this time. Not edit, tag or number at this time.



 

Allandale25

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You forgot the other end.

The switch has been cut in at Bayview Junction.

Those snake tracks over by Desjardins Channel are to be straighten out. Switches have or are about to be cut in

Not edited nor tag correctly







Great to see this finally happening!
 

drum118

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I noticed this at Stavebank Rd in Port Credit To Keep Cars Off the tracks on both side of the road. Its the only place I have seen it so far. Then, I see few grade crossing these days


 

crs1026

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^Those are actually anti-pedestrian devices rather than anti-car. ML is testing them in a number of locations.

Somewhere in ML’s recent PR announcements they spoke to these. Port Credit was cited as a priority location because the frequency of train-pedestrian incidents is relatively high there.

- Paul
 

drum118

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^Those are actually anti-pedestrian devices rather than anti-car. ML is testing them in a number of locations.

Somewhere in ML’s recent PR announcements they spoke to these. Port Credit was cited as a priority location because the frequency of train-pedestrian incidents is relatively high there.

- Paul
Wasn't sure what these were.

Sorry ML, this will not stop people trespassing.

The reason most likely why Port Credit was chosen as a test site is because people walk in/out of the station this way since its a shorter walk. Seen a number of people over the years walking to/from the west platform.Seen this happen at a few others as well.
 

Kraylin

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That device is enticing this pedestrian lol. I dont understand how they are a deterrent, someone please explain. I may have to go see for myself
 

innsertnamehere

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That device is enticing this pedestrian lol. I dont understand how they are a deterrent, someone please explain. I may have to go see for myself
They are very difficult to walk on. It discourages pedestrians from entering the corridor.

The real solution of course is grade separations and road closures.. Port Credit area can easily have a few crossings closed at almost no cost. Metrolinx also needs to set up a dedicated grade separation fund to keep going on them after the 10 they are planning as a part of RER.
 

robmausser

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That device is enticing this pedestrian lol. I dont understand how they are a deterrent, someone please explain. I may have to go see for myself
Youd be surprised how dumb some people are. Its simple enough for them to realize you cant walk there. Some people simply think its ok to walk on train tracks, they dont even realize that they shouldnt.

The same people are often illiterate, so signs dont work well.

Take how smart you think people are on average, and realize that 50% of the population is dumber than that.
 

salsa

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Youd be surprised how dumb some people are. Its simple enough for them to realize you cant walk there. Some people simply think its ok to walk on train tracks, they dont even realize that they shouldnt.

The same people are often illiterate, so signs dont work well.

Take how smart you think people are on average, and realize that 50% of the population is dumber than that.
It's not about being 'dumb' or 'illiterate'. They know what they're doing. When the alternative is a 30 minute detour (or worse), it should be expected that many people would rather wait for a gap in train traffic and then walk across it. The obvious solution here should be to invest in pedestrian bridges/underpasses. Simply sealing off these shortcuts and yelling 'stupid' does not solve the problem.


1575053234007.png
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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It's not about being 'dumb' or 'illiterate'. They know what they're doing. When the alternative is a 30 minute detour (or worse), it should be expected that many people would rather wait for a gap in train traffic and then walk across it. The obvious solution here should be to invest in pedestrian bridges/underpasses. Simply sealing off these shortcuts and yelling 'stupid' does not solve the problem.
That's part of the solution - with the understanding that you can't have bridges/underpasses for all possible routes. At some point you have to create enough of a deterrence to track intrusion. Maybe what's needed is fences along the track to deter all but the most persistent of trespassers.

AoD
 

salsa

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That's part of the solution - with the understanding that you can't have bridges/underpasses for all possible routes. At some point you have to create enough of a deterrence to track intrusion.

AoD
And that's fair. I think there needs to be a minimum standard as to how big of a gap in safe crossings should be deemed acceptable, with some consideration also given to the population density of the area and points of interest.
 
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AlvinofDiaspar

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And that's fair. I think there needs to be a standard as to how big of a gap in safe crossings should be deemed acceptable, with some consideration also given to the population density of the area and points of interest.
I think they should not be too mechanisitic (x meters in between crossings = bridge) I think they need to look at how people use crossings (or trespass) along the corridor - it may make sense to have none in some area and more freequent ones where they will be well used.

AoD
 

wopchop

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They are very difficult to walk on. It discourages pedestrians from entering the corridor.

The real solution of course is grade separations and road closures.. Port Credit area can easily have a few crossings closed at almost no cost. Metrolinx also needs to set up a dedicated grade separation fund to keep going on them after the 10 they are planning as a part of RER.
What. The problem in Port Credit (and Clarkson) is the exact opposite. There are not enough crossings for pedestrians, hence the high rate of track intrusion in the area.
 

Northern Light

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What. The problem in Port Credit (and Clarkson) is the exact opposite. There are not enough crossings for pedestrians, hence the high rate of track intrusion in the area.
Well, its both.

Your right, and so is @innsertnamehere. More legal crossings and grid continuity is required; but that doesn't preclude making illegal entry more difficult to avoid accidental (and purposeful) deaths and injuries and to allow/facilitate higher track speeds.
 

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