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General railway discussions

I’ ve been taking the GO into Exhibition this week for the RWF - as it’s much easier to drive down to Burlington GO and train in, then it is to wheel the pickup into the city - and much cheaper as well. But standing on the platform Friday, chatting with a group of seniors, we had two incidents of high speed trains zooming through the station - one VIA, one GO. No whistle, no horn, no automated warning over the p.a. I noted that the second time, as the train used the adjacent track, people were visibly startled and jumpy. As a safety precaution, with a mult-ton train going by at 100kmh?, why would there not be an audio warning of some sort prior to the trains passage through the station?

Markham residents demanded LESS train whistles. This is what you get.
 
One mostly hears announcements made for approaching trains in stations - not whistles, unless someone is standing in the way or something.
In Europe, you hear announcements as a high speed train is about to pass, yet rarely hear it in NA. A number of GO Stations announced that a train is bout to arrive at a platform, but can't recall what maybe said about express trains since rarely use GO these days.
 
New railway lights and gates installed over the summer on Winston Churchill, replacing the crossbucks.
DJI_20231118121749_0332_D.jpg
 
Ahh okay. So western Toronto. 👍

Edit: Looking at RAC, I’m guessing this is on CN’s Oakville spur?
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Ahh okay. So western Toronto. 👍

Edit: Looking at RAC, I’m guessing this is on CN’s Oakville spur?
Location here
 

According to an RDN staff report, meetings thus far have discussed reversion of lands to First Nations along the corridor, contamination and remediation, legal encumbrances, environmental liabilities and the importance of recognizing and addressing historic wrongs in the creation of the corridor as well as environmental, economic and cultural harms caused by the corridor.

Looks like we're headed for the inevitable. There is zero hope of a rail revival here. Almost every stakeholder, including the First Nations are against it. A railway on Vancouver Island is entirely pointless both for freight and passenger though, and the corridor would find much better use as a trail.
 
The Panama Canal continues to suffer from transit delays - this has been going on for some time due to water shortages, and appears to be now slated to continue well into 2024. Delays for transit are now 20 or more days. And now limited 18 ships a day. And a large % of that is container traffic. This is an ongoing opportunity (as the traffic delays have been building since 2018) for Railways, and CPKC and CN could, in conjunction with Canadian ports in the west and east coast, capture traffic with various forms of express services into North America and across North America, shortening transit times from Asia to just about wherever a ship transiting the canal would journey to.
 



Looks like we're headed for the inevitable. There is zero hope of a rail revival here. Almost every stakeholder, including the First Nations are against it. A railway on Vancouver Island is entirely pointless both for freight and passenger though, and the corridor would find much better use as a trail.
Ten years ago I visited a narrow gauge railway museum on Vancouver Island. It was fun, but I can’t see it being viable today.
 
The Panama Canal continues to suffer from transit delays - this has been going on for some time due to water shortages, and appears to be now slated to continue well into 2024. Delays for transit are now 20 or more days. And now limited 18 ships a day. And a large % of that is container traffic. This is an ongoing opportunity (as the traffic delays have been building since 2018) for Railways, and CPKC and CN could, in conjunction with Canadian ports in the west and east coast, capture traffic with various forms of express services into North America and across North America, shortening transit times from Asia to just about wherever a ship transiting the canal would journey to.
I wonder how much excess capacity exists at both the ports and the infrastructure that services them.
 
The Panama Canal continues to suffer from transit delays - this has been going on for some time due to water shortages, and appears to be now slated to continue well into 2024. Delays for transit are now 20 or more days. And now limited 18 ships a day. And a large % of that is container traffic. This is an ongoing opportunity (as the traffic delays have been building since 2018) for Railways, and CPKC and CN could, in conjunction with Canadian ports in the west and east coast, capture traffic with various forms of express services into North America and across North America, shortening transit times from Asia to just about wherever a ship transiting the canal would journey to.
You realize that all of the railways already offer this exact service and have been doing so for a long time, right? There is a reason why CN and CP have purchased lines deep into the US in the past 30 years, and why the ports on the West Coast are considerably busier than those on the East.

Dan
 

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