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"Downtown" elites?

WislaHD

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So after the Keg we went to go watch "Little Italy". I think everyone in the theatre was Italian. Anyways the movie takes place in torontos little Italy. So I'd recommend it for that alone. But I think it's interesting that the Italians seemed to loved the movie and the setting of Little Italy. On the other hand most of these people left the city for the suburbs. What led them to that. Myself I'm not Italian. I'm dutch I don't think there's a little Holland. But if I was Italian I'd definitely want to live in little Italy. Anyways I do find it interesting that in Italy people lived super dense in the city. Then they moved here and lived less dense. Then they moved again and lived even less dense. Then they make fun of "elites" yet love to romanticize the good old days which included living dense.
By the way my Italian friends who live at highway 7 and islington area think that the brt is destroying their neighbourhood. And they are one of the lucky people who don't live to far from the highway so will be able to walk to the road to access a bus
It could also be a self-selection bias.

Those Italians and their descendants are the Italians that left super dense Italy to come to the new world and chase the "American Dream", or "Canadian Dream" in our case.

What did the American/Canadian dream of the second half of the 20th century fetishize? Might have something to do with those suburban houses, backyards and automobiles.

But it is indeed curious that they escape their suburbs on Sundays to come to Little Italy or Corso Italia after mass.
 

jje1000

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I would say that the levers of power lie in the populace that lives the area running northwards of Bloor to around North York, within two-and-a-half-kilometers of Yonge Street.

This is where the old, Liberal-Conservative-Centrist-Globe-and-Mail-National-Post money is with their associated long-established institutions. They go under the radar as they sit above the squabbles of downtown and the suburbs, and they contain urbanistic elements of both worlds.

Ultimately, these spaces are largely stable and not as liberally dynamic as downtown, but willing to support liberal causes as long as the side effects don't affect them and the existing power structure in the city.
 
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WislaHD

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I would say that the levers of power lie in the populace that lives the area running northwards of Bloor to around North York, within two-and-a-half-kilometers of Yonge Street.

This is where the old, Liberal-Conservative-Centrist-Globe-and-Mail-National-Post money is with their associated long-established institutions. They go under the radar as they sit above the squabbles of downtown and the suburbs, and they contain urbanistic elements of both worlds.

Ultimately, these spaces are largely stable and not as liberally dynamic as downtown, but willing to support liberal causes as long as the side effects don't affect them and the existing power structure in the city.
These areas are still a mixed bag. I grew up in one of these areas, but my parents were immigrants and throughout my childhood we rented in an apartment building.

They are still fairly dense areas, all considering. Especially south of Eglinton, you have many neighbourhoods where lot sizes are smaller and semi-detached makes up a large component of the housing stock. Add in the apartment neighbourhoods, and the newer condos that are propping up everywhere and you have a fairly urban environment (that feels suburban as soon as you walk 2 minutes away from any arterial street).
 

King of Kensington

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These areas are still a mixed bag. I grew up in one of these areas, but my parents were immigrants and throughout my childhood we rented in an apartment building.

They are still fairly dense areas, all considering. Especially south of Eglinton, you have many neighbourhoods where lot sizes are smaller and semi-detached makes up a large component of the housing stock. Add in the apartment neighbourhoods, and the newer condos that are propping up everywhere and you have a fairly urban environment (that feels suburban as soon as you walk 2 minutes away from any arterial street).

It's interesting to note that the NDP won in the apartment clusters east of Yonge St., which helped put them over the top in St. Paul's.
 

Towered

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I would say that the levers of power lie in the populace that lives the area running northwards of Bloor to around North York, within two-and-a-half-kilometers of Yonge Street.

This is where the old, Liberal-Conservative-Centrist-Globe-and-Mail-National-Post money is with their associated long-established institutions. They go under the radar as they sit above the squabbles of downtown and the suburbs, and they contain urbanistic elements of both worlds.

Ultimately, these spaces are largely stable and not as liberally dynamic as downtown, but willing to support liberal causes as long as the side effects don't affect them and the existing power structure in the city.

So essentially, they vote for their own self interests just like everyone else.
 

King of Kensington

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Well "downtown elites" could be given a more left-wing cast and refer to those on Bay Street (even though most working there don't actually live downtown).
 

Jasmine18

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I think Elites is just a word for people I don't agree ...

Like some people in Downtown Toronto may think people in the suburbs or rural areas are ''simple-minded'.
 

Johnny Au

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I think Elites is just a word for people I don't agree ...

Like some people in Downtown Toronto may think people in the suburbs or rural areas are ''simple-minded'.

True... I do think some people here from Scarborough and Brampton are simple minded.
According to Ford Nation, practically anyone with at least a Bachelor's Degree in a non-business non-administrative non-theological non-athletic field of study is an elite.
 

sixrings

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According to Ford Nation, practically anyone with at least a Bachelor's Degree in a non-business non-theological non-athletic field of study is an elite.
Johnny I corrected your statement..... According to Ford Nation, anyone with a Bachelor's Degree is an elite.
 

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