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Danforth Line 2 Scarborough Subway Extension

If I had to guess what routes would stop where, then going by the bus network as it currently is:

SHEPPARD EAST:
16 McCowan
85 Sheppard East/985 Sheppard East Express
129 McCowan North
130 Middlefield
131 Nugget
169 Huntingwood
939 Finch East Express

SCARBOROUGH CENTRE:
9 Bellamy
16 McCowan (Thru-service)
21A Brimley/903 Brimley Express
38 Highland Creek/938 Highland Creek Express
43B Kennedy
133 Neilson
134 Progress/913 Progress Express
178 Brimorton (assuming it's successful)

There is also the question of Durham Transit and what they intend to do. If the Ellesmere BRT is built then they may use it so STC would be the logical terminus. DRT buses though would likely use a regional bus terminal with GO Transit and the other intercity buses that stop at STC. So with this plus the TTC routes it still seems silly to me that the Sheppard Line could potentially skip STC for the sake of keeping the route under Sheppard Avenue; it really is such a backwards idea imo.
 
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If I had to guess what routes would stop where, then going by the bus network as it currently is:

SHEPPARD EAST:
16 McCowan
85 Sheppard East/985 Sheppard East Express
129 McCowan North
130 Middlefield
131 Nugget
169 Huntingwood
939 Finch East Express

SCARBOROUGH CENTRE:
9 Bellamy
16 McCowan (Thru-service)
21A Brimley/903 Brimley Express
38 Highland Creek/938 Highland Creek Express
43B Kennedy
133 Neilson
134 Progress/913 Progess Express
178 Brimorton (assuming it's successful)

There is also the question of Durham Transit and what they intend to do. If the Ellesmere BRT is built then they may use it so STC would be the logical terminus. DRT buses though would likely use a regional bus terminal with GO Transit and the other intercity buses that stop at STC.

I doubt the 16 McCowan will go to Sheppard. With all the traffic at the 401 they will probably break up the route.
 
I doubt the 16 McCowan will go to Sheppard. With all the traffic at the 401 they will probably break up the route.
I say the 16 goes to Sheppard simply because if it terminates at STC than someone wanting to go beyond Sheppard would have to transfer onto the subway take it one stop (or two if they transfer at Lawrence) and then transfer again onto the 129. So if the 16 doesn't go to Sheppard than I guess the 129 would have to continue terminating at STC.
 
Th crosstown rail link on the northern side of the city is the 407 transitway. Sheppard won't be extended east of McCowan on Sheppard. The corridor that is being intensified is Ellesmere.

The 407 transitway isn't even servicing Toronto residents - why on earth would that be the northern crosstown rail link.
 
The 407 transitway isn't even servicing Toronto residents - why on earth would that be the northern crosstown rail link.
I'm just telling you, there are no 'cross-town' lines contemplated between Eglinton and the 407. Sheppard is not planned to be a cross-town service.

ETA: It seems like we're going to double down on the idea that Sheppard is not going to be a cross-town service because we are committing to expensive technology for the line (likely 100% tunneled, using wide TR rolling stock).
 
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The 407 transitway isn't even servicing Toronto residents - why on earth would that be the northern crosstown rail link.
I wish we would stop hyperfocusing on strict city boundaries and think big picture. If you live in North York and you want to go to Brampton, how would that trip look?

You would take Line 1 or the Barrie Line north to the 407, then take the 407 transitway.


If you lived in Northern Scarborough, how would you go to Hamilton? Maybe you could take the Stouffville Line south to Union, then take the LSW to Hamilton, or you could take the Stouffville north to 407, then take the transitway west to Hamilton.

Just because a transit project, especially a long distance rail service doesn't strictly exist within the city borders, doesn't mean it has no use for the residents of that city. (Heck, between the Newmarket Sub and 427, the 407 is anywhere between 325m to 1230m from Steeles)
 
I wish we would stop hyperfocusing on strict city boundaries and think big picture. If you live in North York and you want to go to Brampton, how would that trip look?

You would take Line 1 or the Barrie Line north to the 407, then take the 407 transitway.


If you lived in Northern Scarborough, how would you go to Hamilton? Maybe you could take the Stouffville Line south to Union, then take the LSW to Hamilton, or you could take the Stouffville north to 407, then take the transitway west to Hamilton.

Just because a transit project, especially a long distance rail service doesn't strictly exist within the city borders, doesn't mean it has no use for the residents of that city. (Heck, between the Newmarket Sub and 427, the 407 is anywhere between 325m to 1230m from Steeles)
Maybe that's why the 401 is full of automobiles doing intra-city trips. I can understand the Stouffville line example, but taking a trip up to 407 to get across the city (or to Brampton) is sort of a backtracking route - unless your trip begins in NW North York or north Etobicoke.
 
Maybe that's why the 401 is full of automobiles doing intra-city trips. I can understand the Stouffville line example, but taking a trip up to 407 to get across the city (or to Brampton) is sort of a backtracking route - unless your trip begins in NW North York or north Etobicoke.
No matter where you put it, you're going to have a backtracking route for someone. The only solution to this is have multiple east west long distance lines throughout the city, but that will get expensive really quickly. You can build a 401 transitway/east west connector, but that would be a much larger detour for those living in York Region, and will make Brampton <--> York routes painful. Somebody will always lose.
 
I think a lot of the arguments are centred around 6>3, so it's not a good plan. Such as facile argument really shows where arguments are coming from. Just a few seconds or even a cursory google earth search reveals why more stations do not necessarily mean more better.

Yes, having a bus replace the RT is not great. Though I think it will work out better than on-street rail in the long run. Transit City would be slower and less reliable than the dated or current models. We don't need any more innovative solutions.
 
Perhaps my response was ambiguous, but I view light metro and LRT as innovative solutions. Not a fan of in-traffic rail if the goal is speed, cost effectiveness, and reliability.

I'm in favour of a bus+subway style for trips versus a bus+LRT+subway one.

Though above all else I am for more public transit investment versus less public transit investment.
 
There you go, pooping on Scarborough again. I remember you were warned by @interchange42 for making such sarcastic comments a few days ago.
Oh Mississauga. How wrong you are. Scarborough did the right thing and got what it wanted. Meanwhile there’s a surface lrt going right down the busiest part of hurontario. No sir. If anything I am upset that Mississauga was happy to have anything that it took a surface lrt when surely they could have gotten underground if they lobbied enough. Because of Scarborough, eglinton west knew to keep up the good fight. Because of Scarborough Brampton is still fighting. I don’t know why I can’t compliment my former stomping ground? They are an inspiration to many.
 

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