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What should be considered a decent sized condo?

kalvinone

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you don't... that's why it's ridiculous.. in reality, how much time are you really spending in the washroom? and wouldn't that space be better utilized? I mean, why not have a washroom with the sink and have separate doorway to the toilet / bath ? that would be better use of space and would allow for 2 people to use the washroom area..
 

NorthYorkEd

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size will only be unacceptable when people stop buying. Sizes are reduced for affordability nothing more nothing less. IMO, one could live quite well in a 450 sqft unit. My 1st condo was 502 square feet and was very well laid out. No wasted space. I think anything less than that starts to get a little tight.

Why do people buy tiny condos? It's what they can afford.
I'm a bit cynical about the smaller sizes. I think it has more to do with the speculation and flipper market than people actually intending to make the units "homes". More units = more profit$.
 

TheKingEast

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I'm a bit cynical about the smaller sizes. I think it has more to do with the speculation and flipper market than people actually intending to make the units "homes". More units = more profit$.
Absolutely. It's all about $$$. The government and the builders hand in hand.
 

W. K. Lis

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There is another option, that is being done in other cities like New York. Combine two (or more, if you are rich enough) adjoining condo units into one.

Read this article from British Columbia in the The Province, back in February, at this link:

Condo Smarts: Combining units can prove beneficial




Larger space: Strata council must not unreasonably withhold permission but may impose conditions


Dear Tony: We live in a funky, older three-floor walk-up in North Vancouver. It has 38 units and a fairly large building area. The design is unique in that the large balconies are all covered with minimal exposure to the elements, and it has a heritage appeal.

We live one unit from the corner, and our neighbour in the corner unit is interested in selling. Because of the age of the building, the price is reasonable, and we are considering purchasing the unit and expanding our existing condo, which would give us a great living space.

We requested a meeting with the strata council, and while it agreed it couldn't stop us from buying the home, it has flatly refused permission to combine the two units into one, quoting the strata corporation bylaws that prohibit removing walls between strata lots.

For families with children (we have three), this would seem like a great alternative. We will have a home with much more space, won't have to move, and the alterations will be minimal, as we will only be removing the kitchen in one unit, renovating the kitchen in the corner unit, and installing an access corridor between the two units.

We can't see any downside to the strata corporation, and in the event we sell, it would be easy to return the property to two suites. Is there some way we can convince our council to agree to the change?

— Karen W.

Dear Karen: There is a growing trend to consolidating two or more strata lots into a larger living spaces. This is an ideal opportunity to be able to purchase a much larger footprint for lower cost, and upgrade the homes into a very comfortable living space.

Strata councils tend to misunderstand the consolidation of strata lots, and this often results in their unwillingness to agree to the alterations. Just because a strata corporation creates a bylaw does not make it enforceable or legal. Bylaws must comply with the Strata Property Act, the Regulations, the B.C. Human Rights Code and any other enactment of law that applies.

When two strata lots are joined, the exterior of the strata lots generally remains the same, and the unit entitlement paid by both strata lots and voting privileges stay the same.

What changes is the interior of the strata lot, which is the responsibility of the strata lot owner.

The Strata Property Act contains a specific section (70) on changes to a strata lot such as this. An owner(s) may, with the prior written approval of the strata corporation, remove all or part of a wall that is a common boundary between adjoining strata lots, or strata lots that have been consolidated into a single strata lot.

Unless your alteration fails to comply with the B.C. Building Code or your local municipal bylaws, the strata corporation must approve the proposed removal. You are going to require building permits for the removal of the wall(s) and the alterations to the electrical and mechanical systems. You will also be required to comply with the bylaws of the strata corporation with respects to the alteration of the strata lot that apply under these circumstances, and that will include the removal of any parts of the strata lot that the strata corporation must insure for. The strata council must not unreasonably withhold permission, but it may impose conditions around the alterations that include the owner taking responsibility for the alterations and any costs related to the alterations.

Before you proceed with any construction, retain a licensed engineer to act as your consultant to ensure that you comply with building code requirements, permit requirements from the city and satisfy the requirements of the strata corporation. It is a significant undertaking to consolidate two strata lots, but from the four units I have seen in two recent projects, the rewards are well worth it, both for the owners and the strata corporation.
 

AKS

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Absolutely. It's all about $$$. The government and the builders hand in hand.
It's due to several factors. 1) Rising land costs 2) Rising construction costs 3) Rising development fees.

The government wants money. The people don't want to be taxed to death. So they want the government to push the costs to new construction thinking builders will suck it up. The builders pass the costs to the buyers. And then people complain prices of condos are too expensive. The 8% increase from HST hiked up prices quite a bit. Also, there's increasing development fees and what not fees. The condo market seems to be a cash cow for the government.

I'm a bit cynical about the smaller sizes. I think it has more to do with the speculation and flipper market than people actually intending to make the units "homes". More units = more profit$.
If builders to build larger units that sell. I'm sure they would. However, large units are too expensive, so they break them into smaller units to sell better. For example, Berczy had some large rooms they couldn't sell. They finally broke them down into 2-3 smaller units and those sold.
 

TheKingEast

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It's due to several factors. 1) Rising land costs 2) Rising construction costs 3) Rising development fees.

The government wants money. The people don't want to be taxed to death. So they want the government to push the costs to new construction thinking builders will suck it up. The builders pass the costs to the buyers. And then people complain prices of condos are too expensive. The 8% increase from HST hiked up prices quite a bit. Also, there's increasing development fees and what not fees. The condo market seems to be a cash cow for the government.



If builders to build larger units that sell. I'm sure they would. However, large units are too expensive, so they break them into smaller units to sell better. For example, Berczy had some large rooms they couldn't sell. They finally broke them down into 2-3 smaller units and those sold.
You're right. I'd say the government is more to blame than the developers. And the government wants MORE money. CRA is coming after a lot of people. I do think this "greed" from the government will hurt us in the future.
 

ksun

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you don't... that's why it's ridiculous.. in reality, how much time are you really spending in the washroom? and wouldn't that space be better utilized? I mean, why not have a washroom with the sink and have separate doorway to the toilet / bath ? that would be better use of space and would allow for 2 people to use the washroom area..
My assumption is that a 2b2b is easier to rent out. Nice to have your own bathroom as a tenant.
as a family, it is absolutely unncessary.
 

ksun

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I'd respectfully disagree.

Ask anyone with Crohn's Disease (or other G.I. ailment) and they'd strongly disagree.
I googled and apparent that's a different scenario (not a typical family).
Of course it is "nice" to have the ensuite double sink bathroom... but we are talking about small space here. The entitlement of those nice-to-haves is more of a rich country disease. From where I grew up, the family of four always shared one bathroom and nobody has ever complained about the lack of a double-sink anything.

The parents don't have to brush teeth and wash their face at exactly the same time. It takes a guy probably 5 minutes to finish everything in the morning.
 

NorthYorkEd

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One thing I swore when I moved out of the family home (and it's one toilet) was that I would NEVER have to follow anyone after their morning constitutional again. Wallowing in the steam of someone else's filth is both degrading and disgusting. Not to mention, if one toilet gets clogged you are SOL. Literally.
 

Eug

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One thing I swore when I moved out of the family home (and it's one toilet) was that I would NEVER have to follow anyone after their morning constitutional again. Wallowing in the steam of someone else's filth is both degrading and disgusting. Not to mention, if one toilet gets clogged you are SOL. Literally.
That's what bathroom fans are for.

I had no 2nd bathroom in my 2-bedroom condo, and I was OK with that with two people. Yes, I'd prefer having a second bathroom, but only if the place is big enough to accomodate the second bathroom. If the place is very small, I'd rather have no second bathroom.
 

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