Toronto TCHC Block 32 Development | ?m | 41s | TCHC | KPMB

Sidewalks too wide? Now I've heard it all. The aesthetic may not work too well but wide sidewalks are a good thing IMO
 
The last thing someone in Toronto should be saying is "that sidewalk is way too wide." This city is full of 4 foot wide curbs dressed as sidewalks.

It does look as though the public realm along this strip needs something ala St. Clair West.

JosephPiccininni.jpg
 
You can't have a sidewalk that's too wide in this city. Too bad the entire pedestrian space along the street is poured concrete--even the planters. As generic as Tim Hortons is, there's something about that inviting storefront with a familiar brand that makes the neighbourhood seem warmer and more hospitable.
 
I suppose the wide sidewalks add to the suburban feel, moreso in those pictures because there's no one about. Personally, I'm not a fan of overly generous setbacks, especially when the neighbourhood isn't very active in terms of pedestrian traffic.
 
When you have the density of this neighbourhood, you shouldn't mess around with narrow sidewalks. Life is sharing the sidewalk with people with strollers, bags in both hands, seniors on scooters and couples. To have a neighbourhood where two friends never have to walk single file when a person walking the other direction passes, or where no one ever steps on the grass for extra space is great. Suburbia is a place with sidewalks so narrow to make you feel poor for walking.
 
The sidewalk is definitely not too wide, from my experience at that corner. There are a lot of pedestrians. The picture doesn't do it justice, especially during the morning or evening rush when everyone is heading to work, or heading home. It's also quite busy on weekends.
 
Bingo! MafaldaBoy nailed it!

AoD

But he also mentioned: "especially when the neighbourhood isn't very active in terms of pedestrian traffic. "

CityPlace is a neighbourhood where over 70% of residents walk/bike or take transit to work. It justifies the sidewalk width.
 
But he also mentioned: "especially when the neighbourhood isn't very active in terms of pedestrian traffic. "

CityPlace is a neighbourhood where over 70% of residents walk/bike or take transit to work. It justifies the sidewalk width.

From an UD perspective the suburban vibe of that corner remains - I'd be curious to see how lively that space is at other times of the day.

AoD
 
I feel like this is a case of the word "suburban" being thrown around and used so out of context that it doesn't have any real meaning anymore.
 
I feel like this is a case of the word "suburban" being thrown around and used so out of context that it doesn't have any real meaning anymore.
I can't agree more, I live in that neighbourhood and the last thing it feels like is suburban. The area is very busy, constant bike/foot traffic, in fact in some areas it would be better with wider sidewalks.

As someone who grew up in Markham I know all about suburban.
 
The word suburban still has meaning though; it's the area immediately outside the areas considered urban. Since City Place is in downtown Toronto, this area is urban.
 
This is suburban--your average Toronto side street sidewalk barely wide enough to fit two adults in width--and nothing in the way of comfort. Even if the sidewalks are empty in Cityplace all day (they're not) you should be happy they're that wide lest you ever walk there.
 

Top