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Crosstown LRT | ?m | ?s

W. K. Lis

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I doubt we are going to need them as it is designed to go with the flow of traffic on the street and doesn't cross streets at any point other than at a normal cross street.
They should test out the "transit priority", as it is supposed to be, on The Queensway. Maybe after the K-Q-Q-R intersection is finished, April 2022? Likely they won't, because the single-occupant motorist has priority for the city hall's powers-that-be.
 

EastYorkTTCFan

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They should test out the "transit priority", as it is supposed to be, on The Queensway. Maybe after the K-Q-Q-R intersection is finished, April 2022? Likely they won't, because the single-occupant motorist has priority for the city hall's powers-that-be.
How does that relate to the idea of crossing gates being used on the Eglinton crosstown line? Also do people who suggest them actually understand what they are used for specifically?
 

W. K. Lis

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How does that relate to the idea of crossing gates being used on the Eglinton crosstown line? Also do people who suggest them actually understand what they are used for specifically?
The Queensway has far-side stops for its streetcars, but instead of getting priority to go first at intersections, the streetcars have to wait for the green light, but then the single-occupant automobiles turning left go first before the streetcar. The stops on The Queensway are far apart, similar to the stops on Eglinton Avenue East, so they should test out REAL transit priority there. If it doesn't work, then use gates.
 

11th

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The Queensway has far-side stops for its streetcars, but instead of getting priority to go first at intersections, the streetcars have to wait for the green light, but then the single-occupant automobiles turning left go first before the streetcar. The stops on The Queensway are far apart, similar to the stops on Eglinton Avenue East, so they should test out REAL transit priority there. If it doesn't work, then use gates.
I don't think gates can be used here regardless. Crosstown tracks are built as part of the street - trains follow same speed limit.

If we use Calgary C-Train as example (which does have gates), their tracks are built as regular rail lines in between two roadways. Their downtown section doesn't have gates.

ION doesn't have gates for on-street sections, and only have gates where it runs on exclusive ROW (with freight trains).
 

Voltz

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I don't think gates can be used here regardless. Crosstown tracks are built as part of the street - trains follow same speed limit.

If we use Calgary C-Train as example (which does have gates), their tracks are built as regular rail lines in between two roadways. Their downtown section doesn't have gates.

ION doesn't have gates for on-street sections, and only have gates where it runs on exclusive ROW (with freight trains).
I'd be fine with short crossing arms for the left turn lanes on Eglinton, since that would seem to be the most likely source of LRV/car collisions, and would hopefully make the city not restrict speeds on the line.
 

W. K. Lis

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I'd be fine with short crossing arms for the left turn lanes on Eglinton, since that would seem to be the most likely source of LRV/car collisions, and would hopefully make the city not restrict speeds on the line.
Second best way to keep the crosswalk clear for the pedestrians.

 

W. K. Lis

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Note that while some motor vehicle may have dash cameras, ALL the light rail vehicles will have dash cameras, and in addition will have cameras to both sides, and to the rear, and inside.

We need the light rail vehicle operator to be able to "bookmark" an incident (turning left against the light) and have their supervisor or police officer go through the video and send an ticket to the owner of the vehicle.

 

Northern Light

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Crosstown Train out for an east-end sojourn.

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Credit: Jim Lang

This is the bridge over the West Don River, just west of Leslie St.
 

Amare

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^I'm confused why are the LRVs using the TTC's blue accessibility lights? Didnt Metrolinx' consultants tell them the LRVs are supposed to look like Toronto subway trains? Toronto's subway trains dont have blue accessibility lights.

Metrolinx please explain, i'm sure the logic makes oh so much sense but there's just something we are all just missing.
 

dullturtle06

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^I'm confused why are the LRVs using the TTC's blue accessibility lights? Didnt Metrolinx' consultants tell them the LRVs are supposed to look like Toronto subway trains? Toronto's subway trains dont have blue accessibility lights.

Metrolinx please explain, i'm sure the logic makes oh so much sense but there's just something we are all just missing.
lol, are you sure?

1629519736178.png
 

EastYorkTTCFan

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^I'm confused why are the LRVs using the TTC's blue accessibility lights? Didnt Metrolinx' consultants tell them the LRVs are supposed to look like Toronto subway trains? Toronto's subway trains dont have blue accessibility lights.

Metrolinx please explain, i'm sure the logic makes oh so much sense but there's just something we are all just missing.
Don't forget Metrolinx didn't change much on them from the original order that the city of Toronto had for them back when they were going to be used for transit city.
 

nfitz

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Personally, I find it easier to see the streetcars coming in the far distance with the blue lights, at a distance, I was never quite sure when the streetcar was 3 or 4 traffic lights away, if it was a streetcar coming, or just the traffic lights.
 

crs1026

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^The blue for accessibility had its day, but is a bit meaningless now that all transit vehicles are built to be accessible.

The blue is fine to spot a transit vehicle in the distance, but the traditionalist in me wishes for the old PCC green.

- Paula
 

W. K. Lis

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^The blue for accessibility had its day, but is a bit meaningless now that all transit vehicles are built to be accessible.

The blue is fine to spot a transit vehicle in the distance, but the traditionalist in me wishes for the old PCC green.

- Paula
From link.

The story of Toronto’s streetcar “bull’s eyes”

In 1891, the Toronto Railway Company (TRC) was created, taking over the city’s streetcar system from its predecessor, the Toronto Street Railway. The TRC quickly began electrifying Toronto’s transit network, operating fifteen routes across the city. Electric streetcars were faster than horse-drawn trams, and passengers had difficulties figuring out which streetcar was theirs at night.

This was a problem as many streetcar routes overlapped. For example, Dupont and Avenue Road streetcars operated on Yonge Street south of Bloor, and Belt Line and Yonge streetcars both ran on Front Street. While the TRC had metal signs on the top and sides of each streetcar to denote the route, they weren’t illuminated. With electric light still in its infancy — arc lamps were too intense while early incandescent lamps were too dull to adequately illuminate route signs — the TRC developed an ingenious solution: uniquely coloured glass bulbs mounted on the roof, lit by interior lights. These lights became known as “bull’s eyes.”

Under this scheme, the Yonge Streetcar could be identified by one blue light, while the Broadview Streetcar could be identified with red and green lights. This system required passengers to memorize their route’s colours, and as new routes were introduced, changed, or withdrawn, it became cumbersome. Eventually, lighting technology caught up: while back-lit destination signs were possible by 1910, the TRC became hesitant to spend any capital funds to modernize its fleet or expand the streetcar railway network. The City of Toronto was forced to start its own streetcar system, the Toronto Civic Railway, to serve outlying neighbourhoods.

Though the Ontario Railway Board (predecessor to the Ontario Municipal Board) refused to force the TRC to expand the street railway network beyond the 1891 boundaries, it ordered the TRC to install backlit route signs. These new signs were introduced in February 1913, and those unique coloured bulbs disappeared by 1915. Six years later, the TRC’s franchise was up, and the city-owned Toronto Transportation Commission came into being.
In 1935, the TTC re-introduced “bull’s eyes” to its streetcar fleet. Officially known as an advance light, a single roof-mounted light, which gave off a blue-green hue, was designed to let waiting passengers know a streetcar was on its way. At the same time, the TTC installed dash lights, which both illuminated advertising cards and provided additional lighting, a useful safety feature.
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New PCC streetcars, which began arriving in 1938, were built with the advance lights already installed. By 1940, all streetcars, including the remaining wooden cars acquired from the Toronto Railway Company, were equipped with advance lights. After the Second World War, PCC streetcars purchased from cities such as Cincinnati, St. Louis, and Kansas City, were similarly fitted with the roof-mounted lamps.
img_8717-001.jpg

By the 1970s, the TTC decided to maintain its street railway fleet after planning for their eventual replacement with buses and subways, and sought a replacement fleet for its ageing PCCs. The new Canadian Light Rail Vehicles (CLRVs) and Articulated Light Rail Vehicles (ALRVs) were designed with dual advance lamps, mounted within the streetcar body, immediately above the destination sign.

Advance lights were introduced to TTC buses starting in the mid-1990s, as new wheelchair-accessible vehicles were added to the fleet, starting with high-floor Orion V and Nova RTS buses, and continuing with newer low-floor vehicles. Blue lights indicated that the bus was accessible. As a bonus, when combined with new digital orange LED destination signs, the bus advance lights served to further improve the visibility of approaching transit vehicles.
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The new Bombardier Flexity streetcars are similarly equipped with new blue LED lights, as they too are fully accessible vehicles. While blue advance lights are unique to TTC buses, the new light rail vehicles for Waterloo Region’s ION LRT, also built by Bombardier, sport similar blue lights.
img_8421-002.jpg
 

Bordercollie

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I think those lights only worked 50% of the time on the CLRV's and ALRV's. Seems to be much better with the flexity fleet. Likely in the 98%+ range for those lights working.

On buses the 7000 series Orion V's where the first to have blue lights.
 

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