Toronto 2150 Lake Shore | 215.75m | 67s | First Capital | Allies and Morrison

Before phase one, they'll have to dig/construct/install the underground infrastructure. Not only the sewers, but the watermains, natural gas lines, cable lines, telephone fibe lines, traffic signal lines, and reserving any future underground conduits (like transporters).
 
My understanding is that the building heights, massing etc are not set in stone either. This project is a ways from starting, let alone completion. That said, I was impressed by the effort the developers put in: it looks well-thought-out, and I’m looking forward to it!
 
I read the discussion about traffic at HBS at about 4PM today and thought I would check things out. I stood up from my laptop and looked out the window at the intersection of Lake Shore and Park Lawn. There were fifteen eastbound cars at the lights on Lake Shore and four on Park Lawn headed north. That doesn’t seem too bad to me, though it is bound to be worse when the lockdown eases.

can't forget the new relief road / gardiner onramp which should eliminate most traffic on lake shore and park lawn (south of the food terminal) destined for the gardiner

on top of that there's legion south / north is expected to be reunited which will offload some traffic headed to the queensway as well as easing some of the traffic coming off the gardiner on to park lawn

simple changes that should fix a lot of issues with congestion caused by the gardiner ramps

In which phase will the streetcar tracks be installed?

In which phase will the streetcar tracks be used?

they *should* be part of phase 2 simply because you don't usually want to build roads twice and they'd probably use it as soon as possible just because it would link directly with the go station which would already be in operation at that point.
 
Some of us who have their daisy pushing clock moving closer to the midnight hour might not see it's completion though... :(
 
Interesting read about a similar if larger redevelopment in London, UK. The article heavily criticizes the implementation of the 'mixed-income' model in this project, while making jabs at the 'gaudily clad' towers. I wonder what the writer would think of our blue/green glass and grey-spandrel condos - maybe he'd like them.

 
Olly would not like them, no. Nine Elms is a disaster in its own right, a point the article makes quite well, but there are few if any corollaries to Toronto. Foremost among these is that Toronto is (fortunately) not a global city like London is. There's (fortunately) not the same cohort of international yahoos looking to make a third or fourth home in Toronto their adopted play place. I've got no interest in trying to transform our City into such a place either - I see the lack of interest from plutocratic, conscience-free, nimrods as a positive, not a negative thing...
 
Olly would not like them, no. Nine Elms is a disaster in its own right, a point the article makes quite well, but there are few if any corollaries to Toronto. Foremost among these is that Toronto is (fortunately) not a global city like London is. There's (fortunately) not the same cohort of international yahoos looking to make a third or fourth home in Toronto their adopted play place. I've got no interest in trying to transform our City into such a place either - I see the lack of interest from plutocratic, conscience-free, nimrods as a positive, not a negative thing...
Sounds like a disaster indeed - and the practice of relisting the same properties multiple times to inflate prices and mislead investors was downright criminal! I know this happens here as well, but not to the same extent. As much as we complain about foreign investors buying properties here (some as part of money laundering), it's nothing like London, Dubai or Panama City.
 



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With a Park Lawn GO station, if it gets frequent service (which it will), I can't see how the Food Terminal doesn't become a very strong potential development site. It would be a great place for an office district, with a pretty good connection to downtown. The site is 40 acres... could do something similar to East Harbour.
 
With a Park Lawn GO station, if it gets frequent service (which it will), I can't see how the Food Terminal doesn't become a very strong potential development site. It would be a great place for an office district, with a pretty good connection to downtown. The site is 40 acres... could do something similar to East Harbour.
Find me another 40 acre plot with immediate access to a highway within the city. Until then, it's not a good idea and wont be happening for various key reasons.

If our current idiotic/developer friendly provincial government was able to get it through their heads that the site is critically important, that alone is enough to tell you something.
 
Why is that important? The Food Terminal's role is probably not what most people think it is. The vast majority of produce bypasses it and goes directly to massive retailer/distributor distribution centres in the suburbs. The facility is antiquated and of convenience only to small or specialty operators, and could serve that role as well on an industrial site in Mississauga/Brampton.
 

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