160 Front West | 239.87m | 46s | Cadillac Fairview | AS + GG

AlvinofDiaspar

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Wouldn't it be nice to see this development use the Korean built tower's gold plated facade instead of the same blue green look for this project! Seen in the photos up above.

The FKI Tower in Korea didn't use gold-tinted glass (like RBC did); the effect is environmental (dawn/dusk). You will get similar effect with this project under similar conditions.

AoD
 

ericmacm

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Wouldn't it be nice to see this development use the Korean built tower's gold plated facade instead of the same blue green look for this project! Seen in the photos up above.
The FKI tower uses standard blue/silver glass, it just appears gold in the photo because of the sunset. The price of gold is too high to cost-effectively use it in glass on a large scale these days.
 

bilked

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B91FFCC3-A38B-4E54-8BF0-331BBBE212DE.jpeg
 

cd concept

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The FKI tower uses standard blue/silver glass, it just appears gold in the photo because of the sunset. The price of gold is too high to cost-effectively use it in glass on a large scale these days.
Oh well! A gold facade tower would have looked nice flanking on the west side of Royal York Hotel. While the golden Royal Bank Towers flank the east side of it. Looking sweet on a photo shot as you can see in the photos up above ! If you know where it would be located on the photo.
 

Mercenary

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It's crazy how if you compare to just 15 years ago, there was so much less construction activity in the downtown core and most of it was low/mid-rise stuff.

We've come a long way...

2006
Toronto skyline by The City of Toronto, on Flickr

With the way Toronto is going, people from 2036 will look back at Toronto at 2021 and remark how undeveloped it was.
 

isaidso

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With the way Toronto is going, people from 2036 will look back at Toronto at 2021 and remark how undeveloped it was.

North American cities, in particular, never feel 'done'. The vast majority of our buildings are functionally obsolete and/or weren't very nice when they were new. It's a massive undertaking re-building the city from one end to the other block by block. The core will get there first but even when that day arrives the attention will then turn to ripping out practically every street and re-designing it so that they're attractive places to be.

I suspect by 2050 most of the streets in the core will be one lane in each direction, no street parking, sidewalks 2-3 times wider, heavily landscaped, buried electrical, and with quality paving. We're really only 15 years in to a 50-80 year re-build.
 

LUVIT!

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Cities on this side of the pond were actually 'done' at one point and from photos I see many were in fact does very well and quite beautiful when they were 'new'. Then came the post WWII automobile boom and the decline of downtowns due to the 'mall' etc. Then came the wholesale slaughter of unwanted inner city buildings and in some case whole blocks. Then came Urban renewal with more destruction and ideas with 'good intentions' to bring back the public. The inclination to fill in the gaps now with the demand for inner city living (until the Covid pause) continues. We are in the process of redesigning now and it's a good thing.
 

The Preservationist

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I don't think any city is ever "done" building although London, Paris and to a lesser state New York feel more complete. From watching the TD centre go up in the 60s to currently having the original financial district fairly much built out has been fascinating to watch over the last 55 years however that area represents less than 1 square kilometre of the city (I'm also currently happy to see downtown parking lots in recent years become less prevalent). Younger members will undoubtably watch the waterfront, entertainment district and the Front street, University Ave to Yorkville, Yonge St rectangle built out in the coming years but whose's to say some of those lesser financial district office towers or the Royal York won't be replaced by something 100+ stories in the not so distant future? It never stops....
 

WiddleBittyKitty

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I don't think any city is ever "done" building although London, Paris and to a lesser state New York feel more complete. From watching the TD centre go up in the 60s to currently having the original financial district fairly much built out has been fascinating to watch over the last 55 years however that area represents less than 1 square kilometre of the city (I'm also currently happy to see downtown parking lots in recent years become less prevalent). Younger members will undoubtably watch the waterfront, entertainment district and the Front street, University Ave to Yorkville, Yonge St rectangle built out in the coming years but whose's to say some of those lesser financial district office towers or the Royal York won't be replaced by something 100+ stories in the not so distant future? It never stops....
Residents of London, Paris, and New York would laugh their @$$es off if they read your comment regarding their city being complete. All three of those are seeing significant amounts of construction and change to the point of distraction., like here.
 

Mercenary

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North American cities were fairly dense before World War II. After the war ended, it was the age of automobile and suburbs which led to the hollowing out of cities and many buildings were demolished and turned into parking lots.

Now with people coming back into cities, cities are becoming dense again and many parking lots are now being re-developed.

Toronto has gone under a massive development since 1990's and the sea of parking lots are almost gone. By 2030, I think most of Toronto's remaining under utilized areas will have been developed.
 

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