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Stupid Things

Northern Light

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LOL, we discuss plenty of stupid things at UT.............but I didn't see a smart place to drop this stupid thing.

So I made a thread for it.

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I got nothing!
 

afransen

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It's shirataki 'rice', which is made up completely of fibre, so has zero caloric value for humans. They can't just call it rice, because it is not made of rice, just rather konjac yam.

Probably just trying trying to dumb it down for consumers.

 

Northern Light

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It's shirataki 'rice', which is made up completely of fibre, so has zero caloric value for humans. They can't just call it rice, because it is not made of rice, just rather konjac yam.

Probably just trying trying to dumb it down for consumers.


A good answer on your part.

Though, that info in hand, I'm not sure that I accept the word 'rice' on the packaging, at least not without quotes around it.

Almond Milk isn't milk. Though at least there is conditionalization in the name; its really a plant-based 'dairy substitute'.

This product should be called plant-based rice substitute or Yam Rice.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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Who knew rice is plant-based. Learn something new everyday - miraculous. I guess I have been having plastic pellets for all these years.

AoD
 

lenaitch

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Ask this bird. S/he'll hook you up.
I don't fully understand the science but pretty much any fruit can naturally ferment given the right conditions. One of our houses had a mountain ash, and every fall, cedar waxwings would descend on in and within a day or two it would be bare of berries and, during the process, they would fly into windows, walls, each other. I assumed it was the booze.
 

AlvinofDiaspar

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I don't fully understand the science but pretty much any fruit can naturally ferment given the right conditions. One of our houses had a mountain ash, and every fall, cedar waxwings would descend on in and within a day or two it would be bare of berries and, during the process, they would fly into windows, walls, each other. I assumed it was the booze.

Yep!


Sounds like @Bayer need to go do some foraging!

AoD
 

Northern Light

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I don't fully understand the science

Here's your science:

The origin of alcohol probably goes back 200 million years or so (late Paleozoic), when the materials that its generation requires had all appeared on earth; namely, water, plant sugars (or starches), and yeast.

a. Yeast is a ubiquitously prolific microorganism with a voracious appetite for sweets.

b. Like all fungi, yeasts lack chlorophyll and cannot manufacture their own food.

c. Yeast is a single-celled ascomycete (fungus) and, in an anaerobic environment, yeast will forego aerobic respiration in favor of fermentation.

i. Fermentation is a form of combustion, resulting in the breakdown of carbohydrates into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

ii. In metabolizing sugar to obtain energy for itself, it creates ethyl alcohol as a by-product of its efforts.

iii. Alcoholic fermentation is the result of anaerobic respiration by yeast.

iv. Fermentation, the breakdown of carbohydrates to alcohol and CO2 - is not a total combustion. Yeast has only a limited tolerance for alcohol: when the alcohol content of the anaerobic environment reaches above 14%m the yeast organism dies.

v. Yeast used for the preparation of products for consumption (beer and wine) is chiefly of the genus Saccharomyces

vi. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a brewer’s yeast, is a representative of budding yeasts that occur in nature on various fruits



From: https://landau.faculty.unlv.edu/alcohol.htm


To elaborate, most fermented fruit peaks at 7-9% alcohol; absent human intervention (distilling and fortification) the nature of yeast has an outer limit of 14% (though specialty yeasts that humans use can induce alcohol as high as 21% before the yeast dies. )
 

SunriseChampion

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@Bayer

I've been fermenting some apple cider in my fridge since October, nice and slow and have some elderflower ferment as well so if you're ever in need of alcohol-plant-drinks...holla at yo' boy.

The cider is alright but the elderflower wine is even better as it's a ferment using kombucha SCOBY.

I also have gin if you're not interested in novel fermentation experiments. :D


This OP reminds me of "Gluten Free" being put on just about anything and everything. You're fine. Shut up, eat the gluten, just not as much of it as you used to, duh.
 

lenaitch

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Here's your science:

The origin of alcohol probably goes back 200 million years or so (late Paleozoic), when the materials that its generation requires had all appeared on earth; namely, water, plant sugars (or starches), and yeast.

a. Yeast is a ubiquitously prolific microorganism with a voracious appetite for sweets.

b. Like all fungi, yeasts lack chlorophyll and cannot manufacture their own food.

c. Yeast is a single-celled ascomycete (fungus) and, in an anaerobic environment, yeast will forego aerobic respiration in favor of fermentation.

i. Fermentation is a form of combustion, resulting in the breakdown of carbohydrates into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

ii. In metabolizing sugar to obtain energy for itself, it creates ethyl alcohol as a by-product of its efforts.

iii. Alcoholic fermentation is the result of anaerobic respiration by yeast.

iv. Fermentation, the breakdown of carbohydrates to alcohol and CO2 - is not a total combustion. Yeast has only a limited tolerance for alcohol: when the alcohol content of the anaerobic environment reaches above 14%m the yeast organism dies.

v. Yeast used for the preparation of products for consumption (beer and wine) is chiefly of the genus Saccharomyces

vi. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a brewer’s yeast, is a representative of budding yeasts that occur in nature on various fruits



From: https://landau.faculty.unlv.edu/alcohol.htm


To elaborate, most fermented fruit peaks at 7-9% alcohol; absent human intervention (distilling and fortification) the nature of yeast has an outer limit of 14% (though specialty yeasts that humans use can induce alcohol as high as 21% before the yeast dies. )

Thanks for that. Some of the FNTs I worked on in N/W Ontario back in the day were adept at making 'home brew' our of some of the damnedest things; potatoes, canned beans, ketchup, aged for about a day. We often wanted to send some off for analysis of alcohol content, I doubt it was very high. They would get screaming drunk on it, which I suspect was as much psychological and metabolism than anything else.
 

SunriseChampion

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The latest greatest I've heard about involved prune juice and dead mice in prison.

That's so degenerate I can't fathom and trust me, I've seen degenerate.
 

SunriseChampion

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Creative species aren't we.
People will come up with very novel ways of getting high. Smoking meth out of lightbulbs; home-made syringes; alcohol from mouse carcass and prune juice; nutmeg.

I know I said it was degenerate beyond comprehension, but I think it's also genius. To think to use the bacteria and fungus present in a mouse carcass to ferment prune juice. Honestly creative biochem right there. Kudos, you degens. :D

But yeah, we are the greatest apes, for better AND worse.
 

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