News   Sep 22, 2023
 427     0 
News   Sep 22, 2023
 829     2 
News   Sep 22, 2023
 578     0 

Sherway (Greenfield South) Power Plant

No but when people buy a house that borders an industrial zoned piece of property they should look at the potential uses of the land not just the light warehousing current use.

And "potential uses of the land also includes" residential obviously.
 
No but when people buy a house that borders an industrial zoned piece of property they should look at the potential uses of the land not just the light warehousing current use.
If people don't do there homework about finding out what is in the area around them before buying their home, that their problem after they move in.

Time after time, these clueless folks or people with a view of changing the area into something different have 2 choices on a project like this; One: move out of the area; 2: learn to live with it.

There are times when NINMBY's needs to happen if something is going to do more harm than good takes place. IE: highway or box stores.

Having your eggs in one basket related to hydro, is a blackout waiting to happen. With these mini power plants, you are taking an area off the grid line to the point if a major outage takes place, these plants can continue to keep power flowing to those areas.

I have been pushing Metrolinx to look at building their own plants for the electrification of the lines so they will have power to continue to operate if there is a major outage. TTC should do the same. By doing so, people still can use transit to get to where they are going in the first place.

Industrial land in the 416 is on the decline because residential needs are pushing them out of the city. Only have to look at the waterfront to see this. Light industrial business and residental can co-exist if people take their blinds off and this starts at the City level. Taxes play a large part of the decline as well buildings are to old to bring them up to current standards and needs.
 
Um, our whole economy is based on the burning of fossil fuels. We burn fossil fuels for power generation all across this province and country, and we use fossil fuels to transport ourselves and our goods. Without fossil fuels you would have no standard of living, and would not be living where you are now in the first place.

There is something definitely wrong with NIMBYism when it is rooted solely in self-interest. Your NIMBY is no different than the rural 'no-wind' NIMBYs that are holding up green energy progress across the province. Who is going to generate your power if everyone pulls a NIMBY?

In this day and age, you can't have a clean, safe place to live without energy. And you can't just fob off something undesirable just because it doesn't work for you. That's wrong.

Pssst - people live in rural areas too!

For Ontario, if you exclude nuclear, 21% of power generated comes from fossil fuels (coal, natural gas). Some areas are more populated than others, all I'm saying is that these types of facilities should not be placed in densely populated urban centers, where they will have a deeper impact on the health and well being of individuals.
 
If you are opposed to something like gas fired production of electricity be opposed to it....don't just be opposed to it because it is too close to your house. That is NIMBY and that is bad. A fuller, extended short form (new term!) is TIOKBNIMBY (that is ok but.....) when you say it that way it starts to be clearer why NIMBY is bad. The people opposing Spadina weren't saying "I see why we need a freeway but build it a few miles over there so that I am not bothered by it" they were saying "no more inner city freeways"....until the people in 'sauga/Etobicoke and Oakville before them campaign against gas fired production of electricity anywhere, they get no sympathy from me......both, Oakville's and this generation facility were in well established, well defined industrial settings....the fact that people built/bought/owned homes so close to those industrial areas is the issue not that industry wants to be there....what's next, people in the west end complaining about noise and smell from slaughter houses? people in malton/meadowvale/Brampton saying the airport is too noisy? We all make, to some level, choices about where we live...don't make the choice to live near industry and then expect sympathy/support when the type of industry does not suit your lifestyle goals.

How many times we've had a residential development firmly in place, and then the surrounding land next to it be zoned industrial? Lots. It's not always about choice.
 
Closest residential is on Coram? Which is separated from the site by a bit of distance (is it a km? more? less?) and two rows of industrial property.

I get what you are saying...those homes weren't built yesterday, but neither was the existing industrial uses that they border.

Closest home is 100 meters away. Coram Cres is about 300 meters. Most of the homes were built in the mid 60's, at the same time or earlier than the industrial buildings.
 
Some areas are more populated than others, all I'm saying is that these types of facilities should not be placed in densely populated urban centers, where they will have a deeper impact on the health and well being of individuals.
However if you place all your generating capacity a long way from the city, then in extreme blackout type situations (2003 ... or Montreal in 1998) you have nothing except emergency power.

In an extreme ice storm situation, you don't want to be relying on long-distance power lines for all the power for an entire city. As bad as Montreal was, in 1998, a single large power transmission line remained up; and this was used to keep water pumping, etc. It could have been a lot worse - and this would have been mitigated if there was any generation capacity with the city of Montreal.
 
If people don't do there homework about finding out what is in the area around them before buying their home, that their problem after they move in.

Time after time, these clueless folks or people with a view of changing the area into something different have 2 choices on a project like this; One: move out of the area; 2: learn to live with it.

There are times when NINMBY's needs to happen if something is going to do more harm than good takes place. IE: highway or box stores.

Having your eggs in one basket related to hydro, is a blackout waiting to happen. With these mini power plants, you are taking an area off the grid line to the point if a major outage takes place, these plants can continue to keep power flowing to those areas.

I have been pushing Metrolinx to look at building their own plants for the electrification of the lines so they will have power to continue to operate if there is a major outage. TTC should do the same. By doing so, people still can use transit to get to where they are going in the first place.

Industrial land in the 416 is on the decline because residential needs are pushing them out of the city. Only have to look at the waterfront to see this. Light industrial business and residental can co-exist if people take their blinds off and this starts at the City level. Taxes play a large part of the decline as well buildings are to old to bring them up to current standards and needs.

Just how many major outages have we had due to lack of generating power?

ZERO.

The CO2 pollution that this power plant will generate is akin to putting 50,000 cars on the roads of the GTA, and this is just at 25% yearly operating capacity. The Portlands EC has been operating at +50%. For you to reason that it's OK to NIMBY against Box Stores or Highways, which probably may or may not have the same impact, is just simply mind boggling.

Eggs in One Basket? Maybe you can explain this statement, because the last time I checked our power comes from broad sources, with power generation fairly well distributed.
 
How many times we've had a residential development firmly in place, and then the surrounding land next to it be zoned industrial? Lots. It's not always about choice.

"Lots"? I would love to see examples of land that borders residential being rezoned to industrial. Yes, when formerly vacant, already zoned, industrial land gets used for its intended purpose we see the occupiers of the residential land acting surprised and indignant...but actually having land rezoned as industrial when it directly borders residential....I don't know that happens ever, nevermind "lots".
 
Closest home is 100 meters away. Coram Cres is about 300 meters. Most of the homes were built in the mid 60's, at the same time or earlier than the industrial buildings.

Yes, I believe they were there at/near/about the same time....and the original buyers/builders of the homes would have been aware of what was going on (or could be going on) "over there". There was a time when a home near industry was seen as a good thing....a time when people tried to get a home near where they worked.

Subsequent buyers/owners (and I would imagine there are a fair few of them signing petitions now) would have been well aware that the land over the road was zoned industrial.
 
Let's see how the residents react if 100 wind turbines are installed in the neighbourhood - that is almost the equivalent of the the one power plant being built, and no emissions!
 
For Ontario, if you exclude nuclear, 21% of power generated comes from fossil fuels (coal, natural gas). Some areas are more populated than others, all I'm saying is that these types of facilities should not be placed in densely populated urban centers, where they will have a deeper impact on the health and well being of individuals.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ontario_electricity_supply_2005.png

Why the interesting clause 'if you exclude nuclear'? If you were to agree with the premise that all power should be generated within the township boundaries of the users, what would you suggest for Mississauga? What other power plants are you protesting, other than this one?
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ontario_electricity_supply_2005.png

Why the interesting clause 'if you exclude nuclear'? If you were to agree with the premise that all power should be generated within the township boundaries of the users, what would you suggest for Mississauga? What other power plants are you protesting, other than this one?

Ontario's Power Supply picture has changed considerably since 2005. The link you posted is out of date.

This is the current picture (2010): http://www.ieso.ca/imoweb/siteShared/images/gen_by_fuel_yearly_output-2010.png

I excluded nuclear, because technically it is a "fossil fuel", but an emissions free source of energy.

I don't agree that all power should be generated within the township boundaries. Power plants should not be located near residential areas, and if they are, they should have a substantial (2km+) buffer zone around them
 
Ontario's Power Supply picture has changed considerably since 2005. The link you posted is out of date.

This is the current picture (2010): http://www.ieso.ca/imoweb/siteShared/images/gen_by_fuel_yearly_output-2010.png

I excluded nuclear, because technically it is a "fossil fuel", but an emissions free source of energy.

I don't agree that all power should be generated within the township boundaries. Power plants should not be located near residential areas, and if they are, they should have a substantial (2km+) buffer zone around them

Just curious....why 2km? What is it that people are afraid of here that will affect people 300 m away but not people 2km away.....what is the science?
 

Top